Bruce Gilden Explains What Makes a Great Street Photograph

Screenshot taken from the video

Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden himself spent decades perfecting his signature style of filling the frame with candid close-up portraits, making him one of the revered – and often imitated – street photographers in that arena. With street photography being one of the most popular categories today, it’s one of those genres many photographers take a stab at, albeit mostly blindly. To make things extra challenging, there are really no hard and fast rules you can follow to guarantee a compelling street snap; all those guides and photo books can give you is something you can start with. What you can do, however, is diligently and persistently practice until you get your own style, voice, and storytelling technique.

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An Inside Look at How Black and White Films Are Made at the Ilford Photo Factory

Screenshot taken from the video

Ilford, a long-time favorite black and white film brand with a whopping 137 years in the industry, is also a stalwart upholder of film photography in the digital age. Therefore, getting even a peek at how they make each prized roll is something that is certainly on every film photographer’s bucket list. For anyone who says film is dead, here's a fascinating video of fresh films being made that will prove them wrong.

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The Gripping Story of Dorothea Lange’s “Migrant Mother”

Screenshot taken from the video

Many years after Dorothea Lange took her iconic “Migrant Mother” photograph in 1936, the portrait of a troubled mother with her bashful children remains one of the most important images of The Great Depression. Anyone who doesn’t know yet can’t help but wonder about the story behind her worried expression and distracted gaze. Where was this photographed? Who was she? Was she looking after the children by herself? Why did she look so distraught?

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National Geographic Photographer Ira Block Gives Tips for Instagram and Documentary Photographers

Photographer Ira Block has traveled around the world and these days is both a National Geographic Photographer and a Sony Artisan. To that end, he's one of the perfect photographers to speak to about documentary photography. Earlier this year, he spent some time in front of the camera with us talking about modern documentary photography and how it's changed over the years. To start with though, Ira imparts a few tips for photographers looking to get into documentary photography. Not to our surprise, he tells us a lot of it has to do with passion and preparation.

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Could The Nikon D850 Have 8K Timelapse, Sony a7r II’s Sensor?

With last night’s announcement of the new Nikon D850, the only thing that we possibly know about it is that the camera will apparently have an 8k timelapse mode. But if history is going to repeat itself, we may see something that Nikon has done before–use Sony’s Sensors. The Nikon D850 is said to be a high resolution, high performance DSLR. And when I see that, I think about the Sony a99 II in some ways. Considering that Nikon has been using Sony sensors for a while now for many of their cameras, it would make sense that that’s what we’re going to see.

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Silent Killers Puts Pollution of the Ocean Front and Center in these Photos

All images for Silent Killers by Jose G Cano and Christine Ren. Used with permission.

“To stop derelict gear being left in the first place, requires international policy change and regulations & monitoring of the fishing industry.” stated Christine Ren about her project Silent Killers. The photo series has been making the rounds on the web and is designed to bring attention to a big problem: pollution of the water.

So naturally, we wanted to get to know a bit more about the creative message behind the project.

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How to Get the Soft Focus Look in Your Photos Using Adobe Lightroom (Free Presets)

One of the popular photo looks these days is the soft focus look; and for many photographers it’s tough to get it just right unless you really understand what’s going on. The soft focus look is based on what photographers used to produce years ago in the film days. Some photographers achieved it by putting stockings over the front of the lens or rubbing vaseline on a piece of glass then putting that in front of the lens. Other photographers do it by scratching a lens up a whole lot to kill the sharpness and details the lens can produce.

I’m pretty positive you don’t want to scratch up some glass, so here’s how you can get the look using Adobe Lightroom.

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