Review: MS Optics 28mm f2 Pancake Lens (Leica M Mount)

The MS Optics 28mm f2 Pancake lens offering is a lens that should be permanently glued to a Leica CL if you have one. Now, don’t go doing that for real now, but more to the point, this is a lens that really should be glued on. Why? It’s incredibly small. The MS Optics 28mm f2 is one of the smallest lens offerings for the Leica M mount, with perhaps only Lomography’s Minitar 32mm f2.8 lens rivaling it. In fact, both of those lenses have unique image qualities to them as well as drastically different price points. Their operation is quite similar though due to their being this small.

One thing is for absolutely certain: mate the MS Optics 28mm f2 to your Leica M mount (or any M mount camera) and the package will be that much lighter and smaller than nearly any other lens you use with your camera.

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KONO! Films Now Come in Single Rolls

Heads up, film photographers! If you’re looking for some new and experimental films to try, KONO! has recently made their selection of films available for purchase in single rolls. This makes sampling their funky films easier on the pocket, especially if you’re more keen on variety than quantity for testing them out.

If you’re not yet familiar with KONO!, it’s an alternative film company that produces some wacky emulsions they call “Reanimated Films” — in some cases they’re special materials which weren’t originally intended for use in regular photography. Apart from their experimental black and white film called Rekorder 100 – 200 (above) and their Tungsten film called Kolorit 400 (which we absolutely loved), they also have a number of pre-exposed rolls like the Luft and Liebe 200 that add a quirky touch to your images. Lomography is also carrying another of their Tungsten film called Donau, which has the lowest film sensitivity for 35mm films currently in the market today at ISO 6.

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Review: Kodak TMax 400 (35mm and 120)

Kodak T-Max 400 doesn’t get all the love, love letters, and overall adoration that Kodak Tri-X 400 does simply because of the fact that a ton of the most iconic photos in the world were shot on Tri-X 400 vs T-Max 400. However, part of that has to do with the fact that Tri-X has been around for a longer period of time and T-Max 400 is designed to do something much different. While Tri-X 400 is known for its characteristic midtones and grain, T-Max 400 is instead known for its fairly high contrast (in the highlights and shadows), its incredibly fine grain and its overall sharpness. It’s touted to be the sharpest black and white 400 speed film in the world. Indeed, there has been a movement in the black and white photography world towards the high contrast, crispy, sharp look. And that’s essentially what Kodak T-Max 400 can do while still retaining a fair amount of details in the midtones. It does it in a much different way from a film like Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400–which is a near infrared film. Yet it also differs from many of the Ilford emulsions.Before you go on, more of the specific technical details of using Kodak T-Max 400 can be found in this Kodak PDF file.

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UPDATED: After 2019, Fujifilm Acros 100 4×5 Cut Sheet Film Will No Longer Be in Production

EDITOR’S NOTE: We’ve added updates to this article.

Today, Fujifilm officially announced that after 2019, Fujifilm Acros 100 4×5 cut sheet film will no longer be in production. This statement is currently being applied only to the 4×5 cut sheet film and it is currently unclear if it will apply to the 35mm and 120 emulsion offerings, but we will confirm this in the morning. Fujifilm Acros 100 is a very interesting black and white film in that it offers a very fine grain but also is very versatile. As we’ve mentioned many times in this month’s coverage on La Noir Image, it can be pushed to 1600 with great results. We also did a review of Fujifilm Acros 100 earlier this month right here.

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Alex Teltevskiy: A Filmmaker’s Take on Analog Photography

All images by Alex Teltevskiy. Used with permission.

Alex Teltevskiy is a photographer whose mind works with a bit of eccentricity. He loves photography and has loved film since starting in it. But then he went digital and fell back in love with film. He experiments with various films, looks and cameras. His passion is driven by a load of things, and like more film photographers should, he understands how to get the looks that suit his creative vision.

Alex submitted to be featured in our Analog zine, and I’m sharing his submission here. For more of Alex’s work, I strongly suggest checking his Instagram, Tumblr, Behance and Youtube page.

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Troyce Hoffman: Hypnotic Photos of the American West on Kodak Tri-X

All images by Troyce Hoffman. Used with permission.

“While Europe has thousands of years worth of ancient cities and temples, America has its great canyons, mountains, forests, and deserts; these are our great wonders,” says northern California based Photographer Troyce Hoffman. “They are the great equalizer in our country; they belong to both rich and poor serving as a vast communal backyard.” Troyce’s images are mostly shot in the public lands of the American West and he has worked to capture images of the American West using Kodak Tri-x for a while now.

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Kodak’s Stock Just Took a 20% Fall; Lowest Point in a Year

In a turn of news that I really wish I didn’t have to report, Kodak’s stock isn’t doing so well at the moment. Last year around this time it was pretty low; and then it started to climb up again and remained fairly high. Around the holidays it stayed strong and then back in January when they announced Ektachrome around CES it became strong again. But since then, apparently things haven’t been going so well.

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