Review: JCH StreetPan 400 Film (35mm Film)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon EOS Elan 7 product images (11 of 12)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 2.8

It’s rare when a new film hits the market–but it would make a whole lot of sense that someone like Bellamy Hunt decides to create one. Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 film is an emulsion available in 35mm and was developed to really be shot in low light situations. In fact, he states that it works best in red lighting. For the casual street photographer, that means sundown as you head out on your commute to go back home at the end of the workday. Beyond this, ensure that the film lab working to develop the film knows what they’re doing.

Born out of a discontinued surveillance film made from Agfa, StreetPan 400 isn’t a respooled film, but one that’s reborn according to Bellamy.

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Daniel Zvereff: On Black and White Documentary Photography


This is a syndicated blog post from La Noir Image. It’s a preview of the type of content you’ll be able to get if we receive our Kickstarter funding.

All images by Daniel Zvereff. Used with permission.



Be sure to support our Kickstarter! We’re in the middle and could really use more funding! If you like stories like this, you’ll be able to get all this and more with La Noir Image the magazine

You’re a photographer that often shoots in color; and very vivid colors! So what creative choices typically make you shoot in black and white instead?

I’m not quite sure if there is a straightforward decision in my mind when working on a project that steers me towards color or black and white. I think its more of a feeling, something I can’t quite explain.

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Creating a Black and White Image That Doesn’t Feel Lazy

Creating a black and white image that isn’t lazy requires you to do a lot more to it than just hit the “convert to black and white” option when editing an image and it even requires more than just applying a filter. Conversions are one of the more looked down on ways to edit because photographers believe it to be cheap and easy–yet clients love it!

So how do you create one that doesn’t feel cheap, lazy, and that genuinely looks good? One way includes creating an image that looks good in color and black and white.

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5 Black and White Films To Fall in Love With

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Lomography LCA 120 black and white images (5 of 11)

Film–the beauty of it has inspired apps like Instagram and loads of profiles that digital photographers think can be easily adapted to mimic the look of the celluloid and chemical reaction’s results. You can probably say this about color photography, but there is no way it can be said about black and white. For what it’s worth, black and white film looks beautiful and is much more organic than most results that you’d get from a digital camera.

Here are a bunch of black and white films that we think you’ll fall in love with.

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Review: VSCO Film 07 – Eclectic Films (LR)

Kodak Ektar 25 Warm

Kodak Ektar 25 Warm

In the pantheon of film emulation software, the first name you probably think of VSCO, and for good reason. VSCOCam is one of the most popular editing apps for iOS and Android, and for Lightroom, Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop users, they’ve got a line of film packs that, up until this point, have offered well-known and oft-used films. Now, they have Film 07 – Eclectic Films, a ragtag collection of clean-looking presets. There are well over 100 presets across 18 films, some color, some black-and-white, and some tungsten-balanced. The company bills them as ideal for “portraits, night photography, and architecture,” but they’re good for more than that.

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Five Photographic Film Emulsions Every Photographer Needs to Try


Every single photographer should try to shoot with film consistently at least for a month. Why? Because film makes a photographer pay more attention to a scene than they do to the LCD screen of their camera. The slow process of pay attention to the subtle details, finding the right light because you’re locked into a single ISO setting, slowly focusing on a subject and ensuring that they’re totally in focus, getting the exposure just right to balance the highlights and shadows, and knowing that you’ll only get a handful of chances to capture the scene is all part of what can help you become a better photographer.

Some of the best photographers out there are very detail oriented. And as long as you have the pressure on yourself to get the shot right in a single frame, you’ll be better off.

Don’t know where to start? Here are five films that every photographer needs to try.

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Kodak Tri-X Will Celebrate 60 Years This November

Photo by Michelle Rae
Photo by Michelle Rae

Photo by Michelle Rae

On November 1st 1954, Kodak first announced Tri-X film. This is the black and white film that has been in the cameras of many a photographer for its beautiful look. Tri-X has always embraced its grain and has given street scenes and candids a gritty yet jaw dropping image to enjoy. Kodak Tri-X captured lots of scenes in the Vietnam war. Many photographers that have worked for Magnum Photos like Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, and many more have used the film in their documentary work. Though digital is still the primary form of photography for many a lensman, it still remains popular in documentary camera work.

The film is known for being contrasty and grainy. It has been used not only a lot for street photography and reportage, but portraits.

Tri-X is still available in both 35mm and 120 films in its more common ISO speed of 400.

Via Intelligent Life


Kodak Personalized Imaging and Document Imaging Businesses Now Kodak Alaris

Kodak New Portra 160

We recently informed you about the acquisition of Kodak’s Personalized Imaging and Document Imaging business by the U.K. Kodak Pension Plan. Now that the acquisition is completed, the company re-emerges under the new name Kodak Alaris. The new company keeps the right to distribute products under the Kodak brand, which means we’ll continue to see film- and photo-related products from Kodak as we’re used to, which is good news for those of us who love to load their cameras with Tri-X or Portra. There’s no word yet whether Kodak Alaris aims to further cut down 35mm film production, or if they intend to introduce new emulsions in the future. I guess we’ll have to wait and see how things develop. At least we know that Kodak photographic films aren’t quite dead yet.

Via Japan Camera Hunter