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Heading into a concert? We’ve got good news and bad news for you.

Let’s start with the good news: you’re about to see what will hopefully be an awesome show.

The bad news: the venue may not let your pro-grade camera in. In fact, even as long as it looks pro grade, you’ll need to check it. So for that reason, you’ll need something a bit more low-profile that will fool the guards when they check your bag. The only way to do that is to not have such a serious looking piece of kit on you, but still having something comparable to the cameras that you may use.

Here are a list of cameras that won’t get checked at a concert.

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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony A7s product images (7 of 8)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 5.6

Sony has pretty much revamped its entire line of Alpha cameras from the entry level A5100 all the way to its top of the line A7r. Now the Japanese camera company is launching a PRO Support service program for professionals picking up all its new models.

The premium service offers users—for a $100 annual membership—dedicated phone support, free camera maintenance, expediated repair services, and included loaners while their camera is in the shop. What’s more, Sony PRO Support service subscribers will also have access to loan equipment. So if you ever wanted to use that super expensive Sony 500mm f4.0 G lens without plunking down $12,998? Well now you can.

But before you enroll on the Sony PRO services site, there’s some criteria you’ll have meet.  Firstly, you have to be the owner of two Sony Alpha full-frame interchangeable lens cameras, whether its part of the Sony A7 family or the A99. Subscribers also need to already own three Sony Zeiss and/or G-Series lenses. Additionally, you’ll have to prove that you’re a working professional photographer whether it’s in a self-employed capacity or as an employee of a larger business.

All in all it’s a service that follows closely to the model set by Canon and Nikon’s Professional Services. Call it unoriginal but Sony needs this to create this service as its full-frame mirrorless systems steal away more photographers like Jason Lanier.

In another bit of news Sony has also added more photographers to its “Artisans of Imagery” campaign to show just how good the Alpha camera line can be. The new roster of photographers includes 21 new renowned professionals including Joe Brady, Zabrina Deng, and Eli Reed.

Metabones Nikon G Mount Lens to Sony E-mount GServo-3643-20140727

Usually when we hear about the brand wars, it’s about Canon vs Nikon. And to that end, we usually hear about why a photographer goes from one brand to the other. But it’s rare that we will hear about a photographer that left one of those two brands for Sony. However, photographer Jason Lanier decided to spent 24 minutes on the subject.

Over and over again, he says that DSLRs are going the way of the dinosaurs and that there are features that Sony does that DSLRs should be doing. Amongst the reasons why he left Nikon are the Sony A7s and the A6000. He cites the speed and high ISO abilities of the cameras amongst just how good the files are as other reasons. Plus he talks about the advantages of an EVF over an OVF and WiFi connectivity with the cameras.

Though we’re big lovers of mirrorless cameras ourselves, we have to admit that the EVF is the reason why mirroless camera battery life sucks. But we’ve got ways to fix that.

Jason’s video on why he switched from Nikon to Sony is after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A77 Mk II first impressions images (3 of 9)ISO 2001-60 sec at f - 2.2

Though this report seems a bit crazy to hear, Sony Alpha Rumors is stating that the company may kill off almost all of their DSLR lineup of cameras to push consumers more towards the mirrorless options and pros more towards both mirrorless and DSLR (or SLT in Sony terms.) Instead, only the top end of the cameras will survive: with those being the A77 and the A99 series. Hopefully, this will also help to fix the marketing with all of the cameras now being included in the Alpha series.

Ever since the company announced that both E and A mounts are in the Alpha series, many have been very confused.

If the A mount is to only continue with two cameras, what that may also mean is that the next A77 or A99 models may be positioned more towards a higher level enthusiast than the pro. They’re a company that has always gone after that market segment more than professionals–with the exception of the company’s first full frame camera: the A900.

There is also the chance that the report isn’t true at all because of all of the consumer oriented lenses that Sony has created over the years. It would be a total waste to abandon all of that production.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony NEX 7 product images (2 of 6)ISO 400

After a relatively quiet appearance at Photokina, Sony might have an exciting new Sony A7000 mirrorless camera complete with a new 24MP sensor coming down the pipeline. The camera will more than likely be a successor to the Sony NEX 7 and Sony Alpha Rumors claims it will arrive in 2015.

An anonymous source suggests the camera will be weather-sealed, retain its rangefinder style, and feature full tethering capabilities. On top of this the Sony A7000 will purportedly have a maximum shutter speed of 1/8000th of a second, which will be great for shooting wide open in daylight. It will also supposedly be the second Alpha camera able to capture 4K footage after the Sony A7s, but it’s not clear whether the Sony A7000 will also need an external recorder to do so. This makes complete sense as the company doesn’t have an APS-C mirrorless camera with weather-sealing. Granted, the A7 series isn’t weather-sealed but is splash and moisture resistant.

Supposedly the Sony A7000 will come kitted with a new mark II version of the 16-50mm f3.5-5.6 power-zoom lens with much improved shooting quality. As it stands the current kit lens that comes with all Sony cameras is pretty terrible with poor corner sharpness and rampant color fringing.

Lastly, Sony is also purportedly working on a new Sony Zeiss 16-70mm f4 lens that will also be weather-sealed. It seems like the company is starting to take the higher end production scale even more seriously if any of this is at all true.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After Sony introduces 4K video recording in the A7s (with external recorder), Sony Alpha Rumors claims that the company is working on an 8K camera. Sony purportedly brought an 8K camera prototype to the BBC headquarters. A source at the event claimed the unit looked similar to the Sony A99 full frame DSLR with a vertical grip. Sony also supposedly said this 8K camera could come to market as soon as 2016.

Despite the both the Sony A6000 and Sony A7s featuring great video options along with Sony’s AVCHD format, the Japanese company still isn’t as popular in the video world as Panasonic or Canon.

Sony might be interested in starting a resolution war with Panasonic, as the electronics firm already has two cameras that record  in 4K including the GH4 and LX100. There are also other mirrorless cameras that can be hacked to take quad-HD footage. However if Sony is in talks with the BBC, and potentially NHK, it could be one of the first big providers of 8K equipment for the television world.