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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony NEX 7 product images (2 of 6)ISO 400

A new Sony A7000 seems ever more likely as another source has told Sony Alpha Rumors we will see a new high-end APS-C E-mount camera in 2015. There wasn’t any definite word on specs, but the camera will purportedly be step up from the current Sony A6000. Similarly an exact release date for this camera is still up in the air, however, the source claims the camera was practically finalized when they saw it.

A few months ago we heard the A7000 would be the end all, be all of Sony’s APS-C camera line equipped with a 1/8000 second shutter, weather sealing, and capable of 4K video. Essentially this will be a high-end compact mirrorless camera in every way the Sony A7 Mk II and Sony A7s are except with a smaller sensor. This could also mean that the new focusing improvements added to the a7 Mk II could come to this camera.

It was also rumored to come with a new 16-50mm f3.5-5.6 power-zoom lens. Supposedly this revised lens will be big step up in image quality from the current kit lens, which we’ve previously used much to our chagrin because of its softness and tendency to fringe at the mere sight of a high-contrast scene.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Metz flash product photos (1 of 10)ISO 6401-50 sec at f - 4.0

Editor’s Correction: In an earlier version of this article, we called the flash the 54 AF-1. It is indeed the 64 AF-1. We apologize for this mistake.

Metz believes that the future of the flash is very…touchy. To be specific, we’re talking about a touch screen. So when the 64 AF-1 was shown to us around Photokina 2014, we were quite intrigued. The flashes are available for Canon, Nikon, Fujifilm, Sony and the Micro Four Thirds world. It tries to be futuristic with its massive touch LCD screen. Metz has been long known in the industry for having a more affordable alternative to the camera manufacturers, but in recent years they’ve stepped back to Phottix, Lumopro and Yongnuo.

The Metz 64 AF-1 otherwise is like many flashes on the market: it can rotate around and tilt its head. Unlike Sony’s flashes, the 64 AF-1 isn’t a cobra head design. But like many of Sony’s flashes, some of the settings can be controlled via the camera thanks to its interactions from the multi-interface shoe. This means that it will work with the NEX 6, A7, A7s, A7r, A7 Mk II, A99, A77, A77 Mk II and a couple of others.

The flash is also one of the first designed for the new Sony shoe since the company introduced it a couple of years ago. While it’s a good first attempt, it fails in certain aspects.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM10 product photos (3 of 7)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.5

Sony and Olympus entered a gentleman’s agreement years ago to start collaborating in closer ways. With the latest announcement of the Sony A7 Mk II, it’s easy to believe that they have the same stabilization process. For many years now, Olympus has held the honor of having the best in-body image stabilization that we’ve seen. Indeed, whenever I need to shoot in impossibly low light, the camera that I reach for is my OMD EM5 paired with a Voigtlander 17.5mm f0.95 lens to shoot at very slow shutter speeds and with the lens wide open. Due to the depth of field and size of the sensor, shooting at f0.95 gives me the full frame equivalent of f2 in focus.

In a situation like that, technology like this could be very advantageous. But that isn’t a reason to discount what Sony is doing with its new 5 Axis Stabilization.

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julius motal the phoblographer lensbaby composer pro product image-1

So it was that I received a Lensbaby Composer Pro with Sweet 50 Optic and an NEX-6 for review. It had been a while since I last handled one of Lensbaby’s creations, the Scout and Muse specifically, and this one was considerably different. It looks like a cannon had been miniaturized to fit on the NEX-6, or something that might have been affixed to the robot from Lost in Space. The Composer Pro was a quirky break from the usual spate of reviews, but it isn’t for everyone.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 7D MK II review product images (10 of 10)ISO 4001-25 sec at f - 4.0

“The industry and the state of technology is evolving or developing so quickly I frankly cannot guess what will be five years from now. I am not certain if you’d asked me this during January 2014 I could have predicted the state of affairs today, Dec 1, 2014, just one year later.” stated Henry Posner, Director of Corporate Communications at B&H Photo Video Pro Audio in NYC.

Indeed, technology these days moves so fast that we’re not sure anyone would be able to tell. Not many could have expected that a product from Apple introduced around five years ago would have improved to the point where many use it as their main camera every day. Nor did we think that it would spur the creation of an app that allows a new breed of photographers to make a decent living off of shooting photos for advertisers.

However, it is the job of manufacturers to have some sort of foresight into the future and be able to predict how the industry will evolve and technology will progress. But that’s a tough job–and one that is much easier said than done given the viral nature of the internet and social media.

To get an idea of how the industry may change, we talked to the representatives of many leading manufacturers. What they had to say may be quite understandable.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Tamron 90mm f2.8 VC product images (6 of 8)ISO 50001-60 sec at f - 1.0

Sony’s rumored 50MP sensor is quickly becoming the mythological unicorn of the photo industry as more early reports leak its existence. Now Sony Alpha Rumors reports that Sony has briefed Tamron to develop a new line of SP.2 lenses to work its new “around 46MP” full frame sensors.

Supposedly Tamron has actually already introduced the first lens of this new SP.2 line with the 15-30mm f2.8 DI VC USD. Although the A-mount lens was announced at Photokina this September, it will purportedly work just fine on Sony’s rumored 50MP sensor.

Tamron has also been said to be working on the design of two prime lenses, which will be sharp enough to stand up to the scrutiny of such a high-resolution sensor. We’ve reported on the way lens technology has struggled to keep up with the blistering advancement of sensors, so it will be interesting to see what manufacturers can pull out of their hats this time around.

The same source claims Sony will introduce its pixel rich sensor for both A- and E-mount cameras.

Via Sony Alpha Rumors