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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Leica XE product images (1 of 10)ISO 4001-160 sec at f - 2.5

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Yes, many of you photographers love to complain about vignetting. But you can actually embrace it and use it creatively. We’ve talked about proper techniques to making your images look sharper and making colors pop out more, but another way to emphasize a subject more in an image is to add a vignette to it. Chances are that based on your composition of a scene, the subject will be somewhere around the center or on one of the intersecting points of the rule of thirds. A vignette will make someone stare at your image and complete ignore the blacked out areas.

Of course, this doesn’t need to be a heavy vignette but we can’t tell you how many times we’ve used vignettes on product photos on this site and not a single person has sat there and complained.

If your creative vision calls for it, light vignetting can be a great thing and because of the way the human eye works, it will put higher emphasis on your subject in addition to making them pop out more on a screen or on print.

Beyond this, we recommend bumping up the contrast and tweaking the black levels. But those are all part of the process involving making your images look sharper that we linked to above.

Give it a try: and don’t be afraid to do something that the mainstream may say otherwise.



Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 21mm f2.8 Canon EF mount review images street and landscape (26 of 29)ISO 1600

When it comes to working with raw files, much of what’s been available from cameras for the past five years has been incredibly versatile. With that said, getting better color in Adobe Lightroom while editing has to do with running down the development panel in the right order. For starters, there is a reason why Adobe placed the most basic adjustments at the top and the more complicated ones further down.

And believe it or not you should pretty much ignore the saturation and vibrance sliders. Working with these two sliders are the biggest way to screw up a photo’s color. So here’s how to begin getting better color in Lightroom.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Rokinon Sigma 85mm f1.4 three way comparison (1 of 3)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 3.5

With Zeiss’s new 85mm f1.4 Otus reviewed, we took it upon ourselves to do an informal comparison of two of its biggest and closest competitors: the Rokinon 85mm f1.4 and the Sigma 85mm f1.4. Now granted, neither of these lenses are said to be targeted at the higher end photographer. But with Sigma’s offering being a couple of years old and Rokinon’s not being so old either, we decided that it would be great to see just how the three perform against one another.

Editor’s Note: Again we are saying that this is an informal comparison to see how the three stack up against one another. We’d like to remind our readers though that each offering is pretty darn solid, but if anything this is more of a measure of how the technology has progressed.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus product images review (1 of 7)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.0

For a couple of weeks now, we’ve been testing the Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus lens on the Nikon D810. We’ve teased some images on our Instagram and got you guys excited about what it might be. Indeed, the mystery lens was the Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus. Recently announced in time for Photokina 2014, the 85mm f1.4 Otus is the company’s entry into the no-compromise on image quality arena. It is the follow up and partner to its 55mm f1.4 Otus–which received our Editor’s Choice award.

The Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus features 11 elements in 9 groups and a massive 86mm filter thread. Indeed, this is a serious piece of glass and of considerable size.

And despite the fact that Zeiss has delivered a spectacular product, just one thing made taking images a bit tough at times.

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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sigma vs Rokinon 35mm f1.4 comparison lead image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.8

Rokinon recently announced their AF chipped version of their 35mm f1.4 lens for Canon EF mount cameras. For this segment of the market, it’s about time. The new lens doesn’t sport an aperture ring and instead works perfectly with Canon’s DSLRs in a way very much like Zeiss does.

With the new chipped version of the lens, we decided to see how it holds up against the Sigma 35mm f1.4–the current king of the 35mm lenses in our book.

Editor’s Note: we’re not sanctioning this test to be the end all be all of all tests. It’s informal as per the way that the site’s philosophy works with our in the field real world reviews do.

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chris-gampat-the-phoblographer-yashica-electro-35-gsn-camera

The folks over at Treat recently emailed us to share their new massive glossary of photography terms originally published on their site. If there is any term that you’ve ever wanted to know, it’s probably in here. You can check it out on their website or hit the jump.

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