Review: Sigma 85mm f1.4 Art (Canon EF)

The answer to the question that you’re wondering is yes, the Sigma 85mm f1.4 Art lens is indeed much better than the previous version of the lens. At higher megapixels, you start to see the flaws of the older version, but the newer one exudes an image quality that is truly unbelievable. Additionally, it sports a bit of weather sealing. And the ultimate answer to whether or not you should upgrade really has to do with your own intentions. If you absolutely want to stick to using DSLR cameras, then this is a must-buy lens.

But holy crap, is it huge!

Continue reading…

Lens Comparison Review: Fujifilm 23mm f2 R WR vs Fujifilm 23mm f1.4 R

Lots of photographers that invest into the Fujifilm camera system have been wondering whether they should go for the new 23mm f2 R WR lens or the 23mm f1.4 R lens. Indeed, it can be confusing. Of course, there are more obvious differences: the size, weather sealing, autofocus speed, etc. But then there are some differences that aren’t so obvious.

I personally own the 24mm f1.4 R, and Anthony owns the 23mm f2. So we’ve compared the two for you folks.

Continue reading…

Review: Canon 16-35mm f2.8 L III USM (Canon EF)

For years, the saying used to go something like “You go to Canon for the glass, and you go to Nikon for the cameras.” But as technology has progressed, it’s debatable that both companies are making solid products if that whole statement isn’t swapped. While Canon’s lenses don’t score the highest numbers at DXOMark (except in sharpness where they take a big lead), you can’t exactly sit here and fault a lens like the Canon 16-35mm f2.8 L III USM. Websites around the world can sit here and measure things like sharpness, distortion, vignetting, etc. But they can’t measure things like bokeh or pure character that a lens like this can deliver. As the third update to the popular Canon lens, it begs the question as to why Canon hasn’t decided to go wider to properly compete with the Nikon 14-24mm f2.8 G option. Instead, you get some overlap with the 16-35mm, 24-70mm, and the 70-200mm lenses. Even if you went with something like the 11-24mm, you’re going down to f4 instead of f2.8.

Then you remember something: photography isn’t always all about the numbers.

But with weather sealing, some incredible sharpness, and overall great quality to the lens, Canon is showing the new school of photographers that they’re not going to go down without a fight to the likes of Sony.

Continue reading…

Review: Olympus 25mm f1.2 PRO (Micro Four Thirds)

It was rumored for a very long time, and the Olympus 25mm f1.2 PRO was finally announced around Photokina this year. This was a very long awaited lens for the Micro Four Thirds system, and it desperately needed to be here a while ago. Better late than never, right? The Olympus 25mm f1.2 PRO is weather sealed, fast to focus, and was apparently over-engineered. One of the reps from Olympus told me more about the lens and how the standard it was being judged against was the Zeiss 50mm f1.4 Otus when it came to the design. So if you consider this, then the Olympus 25mm f1.2 PRO really must be a fantastic lens, right?

It surely is.

Continue reading…

Review: Fujifilm 23mm f2 R WR (Fujifilm X Mount)

The Fujifilm 23mm f2 R WR is a lens that’s designed to go along with the company’s weather sealed bodies. It lives alongside the 23mm f1.4 R and works in conjunction with the 35mm f2 R WR. It’s also at a shockingly lower price point than its larger aperture cousin despite having the ability to survive a rainstorm with ease. With nine aperture blades and some of the most pleasant aperture and focusing rings I’ve ever felt, it’s bound to be a hit for many.

Yet for me, there’s something missing.

Continue reading…

Review: Panasonic 12mm f1.4 (Micro Four Thirds)

The Micro Four Thirds camera world has often been a major battle ground more than a collaboration: and that’s very evident with the release of the new Panasonic 12mm f1.4. For many years, Olympus has had the 12mm f2–a stellar lens in many ways that still remains so today. This was an owner’s only choice if they wanted a 24mm equivalent prime, but now Panasonic has an f1.4 option. On top of that, it has a working aperture ring, a nice build quality overall, fantastic image quality, and weather resistance built into the design. In many ways, it’s an excellent lens–and could probably be an essential piece of kit for every Micro four thirds camera user.

Continue reading…

Review: Nikon 105mm f1.4 E ED (Nikon F)

The world of portrait photography is becoming more and more filled with great lens options available for purchase. Sony. Zeiss, Sigma, and Tamron all make some absolutely fantastic ones that were recently announced: but one lens is seriously looking to outdo all of them. Nikon has shown some recent true innovation with the Nikon 105mm f1.4. This lens is the longest telephoto lens to have an f1.4 aperture and also something that absolutely no one else has. Though Sony’s 85mm f1.4 G Master has 11 aperture blades and Tamron’s 85mm f1.8 has vibration control, nothing has the pure perspective flattening that a 105mm lens can–and nothing has the out of focus bokeh ability.

Continue reading…

Review: Pentax 15-30mm f2.8 ED SDM WR (Pentax F)

The Pentax K-1 is probably the greatest thing to happen to many Pentax users in a while; and when you consider some fantastic lenses like the company’s Pentax 15-30mm f2.8 you start to see more and more how someone could almost want to switch systems. The Pentax 15-30mm f2.8 is a weather sealed beast of a lens that works very well with the Pentax K-1 and is designed for landscape, architecture, and Real Estate photographers. But it’s also a generally great walkaround lens if you’re the type that enjoys shooting wide. Like all wides, it can also be used to deliver a very unique perspective when shooting portraits.

With 9 aperture blades in its design and HD coatings to render even more details, there’s a lot to love here.

Continue reading…