Review: Canon 11-24mm f4 L USM (Canon EF)


If you were to tell me that I would honestly fall in love with a Canon lens like the Canon 11-24mm f4 L USM earlier this year, I would’ve told you that I’ve had my heart broken by the company many times in the past few years since the Canon 5D Mk III came out. But when I had the chance to play with the Canon 11-24mm f4 L USM, I was rather excited by its output. Not because Canon flew me and a bunch of other journalists out to the Hot Air Balloon festival in New Mexico, but because when it was first announced I was honestly intrigued. The lens is billed as being completely and totally rectilinear–and when bringing the images into Adobe Lightroom, Adobe’s algorithms seemed to agree.

As one of the company’s wide angle zoom lens options, this is a lens designed for architecture, real estate, and landscape photographers. Instilled with Canon’s weather sealing present in most L lenses, it’s an optic that you’re bound to enjoy if you love shooting wide.

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DXOMark Shows Tokina 24-70mm f2.8 Pro Not Far Behind Canon’s

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Tokina 24-70mm f2.8 review product images (2 of 6)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 1.4

If you’ve ever used a Tokina lens, you’ll know that they’ve always been the even more affordable option that always performs with great image quality–and the Tokina 24-70mm f2.8 Pro recently was rated by DXO Mark’s as being not too far behind what Canon offers. In my review published last year, I felt that the Tokina lens delivers better color than the Canon 24-70mm f2.8 L II USM, and while DXOMark thinks that the Canon version is sharper, it probably is. But Tokina’s lens is more contrasty–which gives the appearance of a sharper image very easily.

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Review: Zeiss 15mm f2.8 Milvus (Nikon F)


When you look at a Zeiss lens, it’s very common to feel gear lust–and that’s what the Zeiss 15mm f2.8 Milvus lens will create in you. As the company’s widest lens and one of the newest additions to the Milvus lineup, it’s also one that will inspire you quite a bit due to its gorgeous way of rendering the world around you. Those that will really love this lens are landscape, architecture and real estate photographers. These shooters will also most likely be ones that wok professionally especially as they’re some of the few that will be able to justify the purchase to themselves.

But if you can get your hands on one, you’ll never want to go back to anything else.

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Review: Zeiss 18mm f2.8 Milvus (Nikon F)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Milvus 18mm f2.8 product images (1 of 6)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.0

Along with recent announcement of the 135mm f2 and 15mm f2.8 Milvus lenses, we were also treated to the Zeiss 18mm f2.8 Milvus lens. This lens is the company’s offering in-between their 15mm and 21mm focal lengths that are supposed to deliver architecture, Real Estate, Cityscape and landscape photographers a different experience. Like the others out there, this lens is weather sealed and characterized with the blue ring towards the back of the lens–which aids in weather sealing overall. Additionally, it boasts manual focusing, a rubber focusing ring and an all metal body.

Indeed, it’s one heck of a lens designed for the outdoor photographer.

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Review: Fujifilm 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR (Fujifilm X Mount)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens review product images (1 of 10)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.0

Compare the Fujifilm 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens to anything else on the APS-C camera market, and you’ll find pretty much no sort of equivalent product. It’s weather sealed, has optical image stabilization, doesn’t change its aperture very much throughout the range, and is built incredibly well. Then tag onto it the fact that it’s made by Fujifilm–one of the best lens makers of all time. Keep moving forward, and consider the fact that you’re putting this glass in front of the company’s excellent X Trans Sensors; designed by Fujifilm but manufactured by Sony. If you’re a sports, photojournalism, wildlife photographer or professional creeper then this lens may indeed by an option that you’ll want to consider.

Announced quite a while back, the Fujifilm 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR may also be the company’s most expensive lens. But if you need something like this, it’s worth every penny.

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Review: Zeiss 135mm f2 Milvus (Canon EF)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Milvus 135mm f2 product images (1 of 6)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.0

If you had to think about some of the greatest lenses out there on the market right now, you’ll most likely think of Zeiss; and today the company is upgrading one of their best lenses to date in the form of the Zeiss 135mm f2 Milvus. Like the rest of the Milvus lineup of glass, this lens offers weather sealing, a solid metal exterior, a large rubber focusing ring, and above all else is promising, class leading optical quality. With 11 elements in 8 groups, this lens has a lot to prove to justify a $2,199 price tag for Canon and Nikon DSLR shooters.

But the big question is whether or not it really is worth the upgrade over their already fantastic 135mm f2. To this day, that is still one of my favorite portrait lenses.

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Review: Sony 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 G OSS (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 FE lens review (1 of 10)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.8

There is very little on the market that can truly be compared to the Sony 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 G OSS lens; and for that reason it’s truly considered something unique. Very little, if anything at all, even compares to this lens in the mirrorless camera world.

For a little over $1,000 you’re getting a dust and splash resistant lens with quite a zoom range and a fairly compact size. Sure, it’s not an internal zooming lens but it’s still not too bad. On top of that, it’s designed for full frame mirrorless cameras. Considering Sony’s reputation, you can bet that it’s also going to be pretty darn good.

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Review: Olympus 300mm f4.0 IS PRO (Micro Four Thirds)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus 300mm f4 lens review product images (1 of 8)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.8

If you’re a Micro Four Thirds camera user, you’re most likely the type of person that loves to shoot street photography–but the Olympus 300mm f4 IS Pro is pretty much a far fetch from anything that a street photographer would use. Billed as one of Olympus’s Pro lenses, this one is designed for wildlife, sports, etc. Complete with weather sealing and a fairly light weight overall, what you’ll be most happy with is the fact that it’s also pretty small.

With an f4 aperture, you’ll probably never want or need to stop it down.

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