First Impressions: Fujifilm X-E3 (Sample Images Included)

I’m really glad that Fujifilm announced the Fujifilm X-E3 partially because the Fujifilm XE2s was such an absolute failure in my eyes. In many ways, it felt half-assed and due to its release after the announcement of cameras with the new 24MP X Trans sensor, its usage of the 16MP sensor seemed odd. Nonetheless, I to do this believe that that sensor’s output looked much more analog than the newer ones. With the Fujifilm X-E3 though, photographers are getting a camera that is perhaps one of Fujifilm’s most straightforward creations in a while. However, there are things that are sort of odd. It uses the same sensor as the company’s flagship cameras and includes 4K video, the joystick that every Fujifilm user pretty much demands at this point, and a shutter speed dial without the ISO setting incorporated lest someone who doesn’t understand how to use the dial goes onto YouTube and creates a video about how terrible this one thing is when they’ve probably never shot with a film camera in their life.

No, with the Fujifilm X-E3 you’ve got a heavy emphasis on just the basics: exposure.

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Review: Nikon 28mm f1.4 E ED (Nikon F Mount)

When the Nikon 28mm f1.4 came in for review and was announced, I was a bit hesitant. Why? Well, while I was excited about the lens for sure, I’m still not a person that believes that DSLRs are necessarily the future despite the fact that I acknowledge how good they are. And to that end, I believe that if Nikon has a full frame mirrorless camera system and made this lens for it, it would be an even bigger winner than it really is. But the current Nikon 28mm f1.4 is a dream lens in so many ways. If you’re a street photographer, portrait photographer, or a photojournalist then you may really enjoy what this lens offers.

In fact, this is hands down my favorite Nikon prime lens with the exception of the company’s 105mm f1.4.

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Film Review: Lomography Earl Grey 100 Black and White (35mm and 120)

Years ago, Lomography introduced Lomography Earl Grey 100 black and white film and added yet another entry into a market looking for more 100 ISO black and white films. There are a few from Ilford, none from Kodak except for T-Max, one from Fujifilm and a few other manufacturers producing them. But slower ISO black and white films aren’t really spoken of except for Acros. Black and white ISO 100 films are great for studio and portraiture work but in many cases have the versatility to deliver great results when pushed.

Lomography’s Earl Grey 100 used to be an older emulsion of Kodak T-Max 100. But that’s changed over the years. It’s now a Fomapan emulsion. But in the end, who cares? All that matters is the results.

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Review: Canon Rebel T7i

If you’re a person who has been looking to just get into photography, there’s a strong chance you’ve considered the Canon Rebel T7i. The Canon Rebel lineup of cameras often sell well due to Canon’s name, their bundles, and aggressive marketing/pricing. They’ve always been considered very entry level and they really still are. But one thing that I’ve always been fascinated by is the fact that their image quality is pretty good when you’re looking at other cameras, comparatively speaking. The Canon Rebel T7i is surely better than your smartphone and has much more capabilities in some ways.

But at the same time, there are arguably better options available from the likes of Sony and Fujifilm.

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Review: Rokinon 35mm f2.8 FE (Sony FE Full Frame E Mount)

The Rokinon 35mm f2.8 FE comes in at a significantly more affordable price point than what Sony’s offering is–and the only major difference is its lack of weather sealing vs it’s Sony counterpart. In fact, that’s the only difference most people may consider besides marginally slower autofocus performance. The lenses even look alike in some ways in that they’re pretty much the same size but with different casings. But Rokinon has brought out autofocus abilities with the Rokinon 35mm f2.8 FE–making this the company’s first autofocusing lens for the Sony full frame E mount system. Indeed, it fills a niche of the photography market that is not really saturated: a place for good, affordable lenses of the Sony FE camera space.

So if you’re one of those folks that doesn’t need weather sealing, then the Rokinon 35mm f2.8 FE could just be a lens that you’ll want.

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Review: MS Optics 28mm f2 Pancake Lens (Leica M Mount)

The MS Optics 28mm f2 Pancake lens offering is a lens that should be permanently glued to a Leica CL if you have one. Now, don’t go doing that for real now, but more to the point, this is a lens that really should be glued on. Why? It’s incredibly small. The MS Optics 28mm f2 is one of the smallest lens offerings for the Leica M mount, with perhaps only Lomography’s Minitar 32mm f2.8 lens rivaling it. In fact, both of those lenses have unique image qualities to them as well as drastically different price points. Their operation is quite similar though due to their being this small.

One thing is for absolutely certain: mate the MS Optics 28mm f2 to your Leica M mount (or any M mount camera) and the package will be that much lighter and smaller than nearly any other lens you use with your camera.

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UPDATED First Impressions: Nikon D850 (The 45.7MP Full Frame Beast)

In what is perhaps one of the worst kept secrets of the year in the photo industry, the Nikon D850 is finally making its debut today. The Nikon D850 is the company’s latest update to the Nikon D810 and brings with it a number of pretty awesome features that are probably bound to keep Nikon users from going to something like a Sony a9 instead. For starters, the Nikon D850 has a brand new 45.7MP Full frame sensor–and they’re not saying who makes it. And as is very typical Nikon in the past few years, it goes down organically to ISO 64–which is fantastic news for us landscape and portrait shooters. But in addition to that, the Nikon D850 sports a touchscreen LCD, dual card slots, a diopter that goes to +/- 3, 7fps with expansion up to 9 when using the booster grip, an EXPEED 5 processor, ISO sensitivity to 25,600, focus stacking abilities, flash sync of 1/250th, weather sealing, 4K video options and much more.

Updated: September 13th 2017 with a sample image gallery

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Review: Capture One Styles (Capture One 10, All Packs)

Presets are the lifeblood of so many photographers who don't have a whole lot of time, and so Capture One Styles is more than a welcome entry into the photography world. Capture One has had a number of styles built into the program itself. Then there are other options such as the large variety of film styles (presets) available. But earlier this year, Capture One Styles was released–therefore expanding the number of official presets made available directly from the company. Available with a number of different packages for purchase, photographers and editors using the latest version of Capture One can utilize some of the newest and interesting options available for editing.

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