First Impressions: Sony a9 (Flagship Camera)

The new Sony a9 is finally here; and it seems to be absolutely fantastic from a technology standpoint in many ways. To start with, it has a new stacked 24MP CMOS sensor and can shoot up to 20fps with a completely silent shutter. This camera is strongly being targeted at the photojournalist type of photographer–quite obviously the pros considering that it’s a $4,000+ camera. It’s being released next month and today we got some time to play with the camera a bit.

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Review: Priime Lightroom Presets

The folks over at Priime have been doing some really interesting stuff over the years. They’ve had tutorials and tend to focus in some way or another on the fashion industry; but their newest Lightroom presets are expanding on the company’s iOS app and bring presets to the world’s most famous photo editing software: Lightroom. Now, I know what you’re thinking: not some more film-emulsion based presets. In fact, that’s not the case.

Priime CEO Arthur Chang tells us these aren’t based on film emulsions, but instead on just getting pleasing looks. “The presets are a set towards creating a set of modern day presets, stuff that is actually seen commercially and not strictly film based,” he says in an email to the Phoblographer. To that end, they’re named after some cool locations and hubs for photographers to go shoot.

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Review: Lomography XPro Slide 200 Film (35mm Format)

To begin this review, I’m going to say flat out that Lomography XPro Slide 200 film has to, hands down, be the weirdest film I’ve ever worked with. But it’s also been a pleasure and a very fulfilling learning experience in my own pursuits of bettering my photography knowledge. To say this wasn’t a challenge is an extreme understatement. Within three rolls, I tried to “get it right”. Pretty simple you’d think, right? Well, yeah–even I’d sit there and call me a dumbass. Except that Lomography XPro Slide 200 film isn’t a conventional film at all.

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Analog Film Review: Lomography F2/400 Film

Every now and again Lomography comes out with some weird, limited edition film: and the most recent was Lomography f2/400 in 35mm. The film, which allegedly was aged over a number of years in oak wine casks, was a negative film. Surely it’s expired, but as every experienced film photographer will tell you, freezing the film greatly negates the effects of expiration. That’s more or less how Lomography stored it–at least according to reports and their semi-cryptic press release. My favorite film from the company was Sunset Stripe, though f2/400 was perhaps the easiest to use.

I keep saying “was” because the film is now gone.

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Review: The Hasselblad X1D for Street Photography

All images and text by Jonathan Higbee.

I like to work a scene when I’m out shooting the streets. I find a vibe or background or light or whatever that exudes life, and I drain every last drop of potential the hell out of it. In attempting to capture a split-second candid moment, it’s absolutely critical I use a camera that’s quick, easy and inconspicuous. In the interest of remaining a stealth street photography ninja, it never seemed possible that I’d be able to make candid photos with any bulky, slower-paced and very obvious digital medium format camera. In June 2016, Hasselblad announced the first mirrorless digital medium format camera, the X1D-50c. Suddenly, it appeared the barriers to obtaining that “medium format look” in street photography had been demolished.

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Shooting with the Fujifilm GFX 50S: Extended Thoughts and Sample Images

The Fujifilm GFX 50S has been in for review for a few days now and I’m sort of wrapping my head around how to test it correctly. That’s kind of tough to explain for many reasons. You see, Fujifilm sent me the camera along with the 63mm f2.8 and the 120mm f4 lenses–both primes which are great for general work, portraiture, and the mainstay of most medium format photographers out there. Zooms are often tough to work with, but in some ways I feel like Fujifilm is genuinely trying to redefine the way people work with medium format cameras, lenses, and sensors.

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Field Report: 24 Hours with the Ricoh GR II Shooting Candids

Every photographer romanticizes in one way or another years on down the line about a camera they’ve used and loved. For many of us, it’s their first camera. When photographers speak about said camera, they’re describing the equivalent of a sensory experience of sorts. In many ways, when you talk to the photographer about the experience, it’s often a poetic wax of some sort to a more nostalgic time in their lives. For some photographers, that camera is and will be the Ricoh GR II.

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Vintage Camera Review: Fujifilm GW690 III (6×9 Medium Format)

When Fujifilm announced their medium format digital camera, a whole lot of people really wanted it to be something along the lines of the Fujifilm GW690 III camera–also known as the Texas Leica. This rangefinder camera shoots in the 6×9 format–which is one of the largest formats to use 120 film. For many years it was used by hobbyists, travel photographers, landscape photographers, and even a few portrait shooters. Due to its 90mm lens equivalent, you’re getting around a 38mm f1.2 equivalent when it comes to field of view converted to full frame.

When I purchasef this camera, I genuinely thought it would be the perfect medium format rangefinder for me, doing pretty much everything the Mamiya 7 II is capable of sans interchangeable lenses. But with more experience, I learned that I was wrong.

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