Lens Review: Fujifilm 63mm f2.8 R WR (Fujifilm G Format)

Of course, the closest thing to a normal prime lens had to be the first thing that Fujifilm announced for their Medium format G Format; and to that end we got the Fujifilm 63mm f2.8 R WR lens. It’s an interesting move for Fujifilm. You see, when the X series was announced, the company debuted at least one f1.4 lens. But this time around, we got slow lenses. Yes, I’m aware that this is medium format, but there are f1.8 lenses in the 645 format–which is larger than G format.

Nevertheless, the Fujifilm 63mm f2.8 is a fantastic lens that I wasn’t sure I’d like. But a number of factors had me coming back to it over and over again.

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First Impressions: Lomography Neptune Convertible Art Lenses (EXCLUSIVE)

Today, Lomography is announcing a brand new series of unconventional lenses designed for Canon and Nikon DSLR cameras; they’re called the Lomography Neptune Convertible Art Lenses. They’re a curious and extremely different system based on an older camera and lens system–which is right in line with what Lomography tends to do. The Lomography Neptune Convertible Art lenses are a three element system which all start with a mounting system. The aperture and focusing are built into the lens base unit that attaches to your camera. Then from there, you attach another optic. The optics are switched out when you want a different field of view and can also work with special shaped apertures.

I had a moment to head over to the Lomography Gallery Store here in NYC and took a look.

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First Impressions: Sony a9 (Flagship Camera)

The new Sony a9 is finally here; and it seems to be absolutely fantastic from a technology standpoint in many ways. To start with, it has a new stacked 24MP CMOS sensor and can shoot up to 20fps with a completely silent shutter. This camera is strongly being targeted at the photojournalist type of photographer–quite obviously the pros considering that it’s a $4,000+ camera. It’s being released next month and today we got some time to play with the camera a bit.

4/27/2017: Updated with sample images.

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Review: Priime Lightroom Presets

The folks over at Priime have been doing some really interesting stuff over the years. They’ve had tutorials and tend to focus in some way or another on the fashion industry; but their newest Lightroom presets are expanding on the company’s iOS app and bring presets to the world’s most famous photo editing software: Lightroom. Now, I know what you’re thinking: not some more film-emulsion based presets. In fact, that’s not the case.

Priime CEO Arthur Chang tells us these aren’t based on film emulsions, but instead on just getting pleasing looks. “The presets are a set towards creating a set of modern day presets, stuff that is actually seen commercially and not strictly film based,” he says in an email to the Phoblographer. To that end, they’re named after some cool locations and hubs for photographers to go shoot.

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Review: Lomography XPro Slide 200 Film (35mm Format)

To begin this review, I’m going to say flat out that Lomography XPro Slide 200 film has to, hands down, be the weirdest film I’ve ever worked with. But it’s also been a pleasure and a very fulfilling learning experience in my own pursuits of bettering my photography knowledge. To say this wasn’t a challenge is an extreme understatement. Within three rolls, I tried to “get it right”. Pretty simple you’d think, right? Well, yeah–even I’d sit there and call me a dumbass. Except that Lomography XPro Slide 200 film isn’t a conventional film at all.

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Analog Film Review: Lomography F2/400 Film

Every now and again Lomography comes out with some weird, limited edition film: and the most recent was Lomography f2/400 in 35mm. The film, which allegedly was aged over a number of years in oak wine casks, was a negative film. Surely it’s expired, but as every experienced film photographer will tell you, freezing the film greatly negates the effects of expiration. That’s more or less how Lomography stored it–at least according to reports and their semi-cryptic press release. My favorite film from the company was Sunset Stripe, though f2/400 was perhaps the easiest to use.

I keep saying “was” because the film is now gone.

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Review: The Hasselblad X1D for Street Photography

All images and text by Jonathan Higbee.

I like to work a scene when I’m out shooting the streets. I find a vibe or background or light or whatever that exudes life, and I drain every last drop of potential the hell out of it. In attempting to capture a split-second candid moment, it’s absolutely critical I use a camera that’s quick, easy and inconspicuous. In the interest of remaining a stealth street photography ninja, it never seemed possible that I’d be able to make candid photos with any bulky, slower-paced and very obvious digital medium format camera. In June 2016, Hasselblad announced the first mirrorless digital medium format camera, the X1D-50c. Suddenly, it appeared the barriers to obtaining that “medium format look” in street photography had been demolished.

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