First Impressions: Canon 6D Mk II

Yup, the Canon 6D Mk II is real–and I had the chance to play with it a while back. The new camera is an interesting upgrade that is bound to be a hit with Canon die hard fanatics and those who love DSLRs. But those of us who have moved onto mirrorless cameras or have been considering them may be just a bit disappointed. In many ways, the Canon 6D Mk II feels like the Canon 5D Mk III. The original Canon 6D, which I own, feels like a true update to the Canon 5D Mk II–and so this evolution only makes sense. Like the original before it, the Canon 6D Mk II isn’t really designed to be a workhorse camera the way that the 5D series have always been. However, there are a lot of features that will surely make it an appropriate secondary camera.

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Review: Kodak TMax 400 (35mm and 120)

Kodak T-Max 400 doesn’t get all the love, love letters, and overall adoration that Kodak Tri-X 400 does simply because of the fact that a ton of the most iconic photos in the world were shot on Tri-X 400 vs T-Max 400. However, part of that has to do with the fact that Tri-X has been around for a longer period of time and T-Max 400 is designed to do something much different. While Tri-X 400 is known for its characteristic midtones and grain, T-Max 400 is instead known for its fairly high contrast (in the highlights and shadows), its incredibly fine grain and its overall sharpness. It’s touted to be the sharpest black and white 400 speed film in the world. Indeed, there has been a movement in the black and white photography world towards the high contrast, crispy, sharp look. And that’s essentially what Kodak T-Max 400 can do while still retaining a fair amount of details in the midtones. It does it in a much different way from a film like Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400–which is a near infrared film. Yet it also differs from many of the Ilford emulsions.Before you go on, more of the specific technical details of using Kodak T-Max 400 can be found in this Kodak PDF file.

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Sample Image Gallery: Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Milvus (Canon 6D)

Hey folks,

I got the brand new Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Milvus lens in and I’ve had it for probably less than eight hours from my publishing this post. But within these few hours that I’ve spent with it, it’s easily becoming one of my favorite 35mm lenses ever made. I really like the Sigma 35mm f1.4, the Canon 35mm f1.4 and the Sony 35mm f1.4, but there’s something about a Zeiss lens that produces absolute magic. Perhaps it’s the fact that one needs to manually focus and then put extra work into actually creating and paying attention to a photo before putting it out there in the world.

The Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Milvus lens was just announced yesterday though and here are a few image samples I’ve done thus far on the Canon 6D.

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Vintage Camera Review: Minolta Maxxum 7 (Minolta a7)

No, this isn’t the Sony a7, but the Minolta a7 is perhaps one of the best film Alpha mount cameras that you can still get your hands on used. While the Minolta a9 is considered the flagship, there are features built into the Minolta a7 that can make it much more appealing. For starters, it’s much lighter. And there is also a built in data back that lets you change a whole lot of parameters in a very simple way.

And to be honest, it’s one of the best autofocusing film SLR cameras I’ve ever used–completely putting a lot of what Canon and Nikon created to shame.

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Film Review: Lomography LomoChrome Purple 100-400 (35mm, New Emulsion)

A while back, Lomography LomoChrome Purple was released in 120 and 35mm formats. But earlier this year, the company updated the formula to make it more stable. With it came the major improvement of making it easier to shoot with. The current LomoChrome Purple formula allows a photographer to get great results whether they’re shooting at ISO 400 or ISO 100. Lomography states that you can rate it at either setting, as opposed to the older formula which needed a lot of light to create the best images. This new emulsion is available only in 35mm, but it provides finer grain and still very nice colors.

So if you’re the type who only wants to shoot in 120, then the size may put you off. But make no mistake, the quality is absolutely there.

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Gallery: Sony a9 High ISO Image Samples (And Extended Impressions)

We’re almost done with our review of the new Sony a9 camera; and so far it’s shaping up to mostly be pretty great. This post is to mostly showcase High ISO image samples from the new Sony a9, and before we go on you should know that it does a fantastic job and I personally like the high ISO output even more than I do from the Sony a7s II. The Sony a9 is targeted at the professional photographer who uses the Canon 1DX Mk II and the Nikon D5. But in some ways it also is trying to go after the Pentax 645z, the Hasselblad X1D and the Fujifilm GFX 50s with the wedding photography crowd. For the most part, those photographers will have found one of the best cameras that they can use.

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Lens Review: Fujifilm 63mm f2.8 R WR (Fujifilm G Format)

Of course, the closest thing to a normal prime lens had to be the first thing that Fujifilm announced for their Medium format G Format; and to that end we got the Fujifilm 63mm f2.8 R WR lens. It’s an interesting move for Fujifilm. You see, when the X series was announced, the company debuted at least one f1.4 lens. But this time around, we got slow lenses. Yes, I’m aware that this is medium format, but there are f1.8 lenses in the 645 format–which is larger than G format.

Nevertheless, the Fujifilm 63mm f2.8 is a fantastic lens that I wasn’t sure I’d like. But a number of factors had me coming back to it over and over again.

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