First Impressions: Hasselblad X1D

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Hasselblad X1D product images (13 of 13)ISO 6401-50 sec at f - 2.8

Editor’s note: With this post, we’re testing a new offering from our current redesign: full screen blog posts. Please let us know your feedback as we’re eager to keep building a better Phoblographer for you all.

If you think about any of the companies who have contributed much to the world of photography gear, there shouldn’t be a doubt in your mind that Hasselblad is on that list. With the company’s new X1D announced earlier today, I’ve got no doubt in my mind that they’ve reached out and touched the millennial generation of photographers in the digital world in the same way that the 500C has touched them.

The Hasselblad X1D features a 50MP cropped 645 format sensor–that is to say that it isn’t a full frame 645 sensor but instead still larger than a 35mm sensor. The camera also incorporates the use of leaf shutter lenses that let you shoot with a flash to 1/2000th with full sync, autofocus, an EVF, a touchscreen LCD, and interesting features such as a mode dial that locks and unlocks by simply pressing it up and down.

But even more amazing: it’s pretty small–honestly if you could imagine a Sony a6000 series camera, put a big sensor in it and make it around the height of some DSLRs then reduce the weight and depth significantly, you’ve got this camera.

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Review: MacPhun Tonality

Chris Gampat La Noir Image MacPhun Tonality review sample (1 of 1)ISO 1001-320 sec at f - 7.1

This is a syndicated blog post from La Noir Image. If you want to see more content like this, please support our Kickstarter.

Nik Software is now free, but there are lots of other options that can help you create better black and white images for a little bit of money. Take MacPhun’s Tonality for example: consider it the closest thing to blending Adobe Lightroom, RNI Films, and Instagram. Designed for mostly enthusiasts, Tonality had some of the same people working on it that used to produce Nik Software’s products. However, it also slates itself in a spot where it makes sense for the serious photographer since it can also function as a plugin for Lightroom and Photoshop.

If you’re using Adobe Lightroom, then you’ll want to right click an image, and choose to edit it in Tonality CK if you purchased the MacPhun Creative Kit. Otherwise just Tonality works fine. Lightroom will copy the file, create a TIFF (if you choose that, and I strongly suggest that you do) and then open up Tonality for you.

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Vintage Camera Review: Yashica Electro 35 GTN

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If you play with film (and many of you readers do) you’ve probably been aware of the Yashica Electro 35 GTN at some point or another. It’s not the more famous Yashica Electro 35 GSN, but according to photographer Ade Torrent, it’s still quite a beaut.

Ade runs the Old Cameras YouTube channel and he prefers the Yashica Electro 35 GTN and an Olympus rangefinder. However, we thinks it’s a bit large. The camera has a fixed lens with an f1.7 aperture and a 45mm focal length  It’s also an aperture priority only camera.

His channel reviews vintage cameras, does giveaways, etc. And the video on the GTN, which is after the jump, is very worth the view.

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Review: Cub and Co Shooter Camera Bag

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Cub and Co Shooter Camera Bag product images (12 of 12)ISO 1001-400 sec at f - 3.2

Cub and Co has been around for a number of years, and while they’re not necessarily as prevalent as Tap and Dye or Holdfast Gear, part of that has to do with the fact that they’ve been slower at making products. But when a Cub and Co product comes out, you generally know that it’s very well made by hand. That’s the case with the new Cub and Co Shooter Camera bag.

You see, this isn’t’ like anything that other camera bags are–instead it’s a blend of leather, Domke, more leather, Artisan and Artist padding, more leather, and the simplicity that mostly an ONA can offer. With that said, this is in its own special category. It’s not a messenger bag, it isn’t a backpack, and it isn’t quite a sling either. Instead, it’s pretty much like a special pod that you sling around you and that makes a whole lot of sense ergonomically.

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Review: Hawkesmill Sloane Street Camera Bag

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Hawkesmill England camera bag product images (1 of 10)ISO 1001-160 sec at f - 4.0

If there’s any place that photographers typically go to on the web to find out more about the latest and greatest camera bags, the two biggest sources are the Phoblographer and Steve Huff. But in true entrepreneurial spirit, I’m always thrilled when a new brand approaches the site with a new product–such is the case with the new Hawkesmill Sloane Street camera bag. The company is based in England, and is determined to grab your attention with their new wares.

Take the Hawkesmill Sloane Street for example: this high end bag is designed for the photographer that is also a serious business person and that at times needs to embrace a different aesthetic. While the likes of Tenba, Think Tank and others make some great practical bags that you may want to bring around for the very general and typical shoot, there are those moments where it would make sense for you to spruce up your look a bit more. That’s not to sit here and defend what some may call a hipster or elitist attitude; instead it’s an embrace of a major reality in the world of a professional photographer who needs to look the part of a business oriented creative at times. And most professional photographers will tell you that they shoot less and do more business.

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Review: Lomography Daguerreotype Achromat 2.9/64 Art Lens

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Lomography DAGUERREOTYPE--ACHROMAT 2.9-64 ART LENS (1 of 8)ISO 2001-80 sec at f - 2.8

It’s not often that Lomography calls the press in before an announcement of theirs, but the new Lomography Daguerreotype Achromat 64mm f2.9 Art lens demands it. This is a first for Lomo: a lens designed on the daguerreotype methods vs the Petzval style. Like many of the company’s other lenses, this one isn’t about the sharpness, the pixel peeping, the MTF curve charts or any of that crap that doesn’t necessarily matter to the actual content of a photo. Instead, it’s about the look and the creative vision that you can create with it.

Call it hipster, go ahead: but that probably means that this lens isn’t for you. This is a lens for the majority of the photography world– those that care more about capturing and creating an incredible moment.

So what’s so cool about this lens? Besides the uber-retro look and feel, Lomography decided to take the Waterhouse aperture system even further. You’ll get lots of normal apertures and a ton of specially spaced ones that change the look of the bokeh accordingly. This is super cool for video shooters and for still shooters doing studio portrait work, you’re bound to have fun with manual studio strobes.

Today, the company’s Kickstarter for the Achromat lens launches. For the past week, I’ve been working with the lens.

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My First Shoot with the Fujifilm X Pro 2 (NSFW)

X-Pro2

This is a syndicated blog post from Ideas and Images. All images and content are being published with permission from Dave Kai Piper.

When you have a new camera to play with, there are few better people to ring up, invite over and shoot than the wonderful Rachel Bowler.

By no means is this a review of the FujiFilm X-Pro2 – just a first impression of the camera during a shoot and files from it.

There will be one coming in a day or so, but I wanted to just document  my first hands on shoot with the new camera. Please note that the camera I that I’m using in this is a prototype that I received directly from Fujifilm Japan.  I received this camera in  October 2015.

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The Phoblographer’s Guide to Zeiss Milvus Lenses

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Milvus lens product images (5 of 7)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.0

Zeiss released their Milvus collection of lenses as an update to their lineup of standard DSLR lenses. They all incorporate weather sealing, an amazing metal build exterior, a giant rubber focusing ring, and enhance optics that make you really feel like you’re shooting with a Zeiss lens. Some words that come to mind are beautiful, masterpiece and long lasting.

The site has reviewed every Zeiss Milvus lens so far, and so all of the reviews are being compiled into a guide for those interested in Zeiss lenses. This guide features tidbits about each lens along with sample photos.

Editor’s Note: this guide is not sponsored by Zeiss. With that said, Editorial judgement has been left in tact.

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