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rangefinder

Chris Gampat 20x24 Polaroid camera studios (16 of 17)

While 35mm full frame digital cameras are very much the standard amongst many professionals and enthusiasts, the format was originally created to satisfy the everyday man. Many moons ago (and some even today) professional photographers shot with large and medium format cameras. These cameras were capable of taking photos that the smaller formats weren’t able to.

Some of these cameras are still in use today by folks all across the world. Here are just a few.

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All photos by Jason Cheung. Used with permission.

If you’re using an older analog camera of some sort or just have a dim rangefinder in one of your cameras, photographer Jason Cheung created a workaround that seems pretty nifty. It involves a bit of thinking in a different way–while most photographers will instead try to brighten the focusing patch, not many think about dimming the rest of the viewfinder to make the patch stand out more. But that’s what Jason did–and he did it just enough for it to still be usable.

More after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Leica MA first impressions (1 of 6)ISO 6401-80 sec at f - 2.8

When Leica announced the M-A camera at Photokina 2014, a spark was lit. We don’t believe it’s possible for a camera to be a soul mate, but if it was then the Leica M-A would be stringing hearts along as it struts through life. The Leica M-A is designed to pay homage to the cameras that put the company on the map in the photojournalism world and that are still used by many photographers today. Those cameras beautiful pieces of machinery and can far outlast any other cameras made out there. Amongst that lineup are the Leica M2, M3, and M4–with the M4-P perhaps being one of the company’s most popular products in this line.

And with that, the Leica M-A is designed incredibly simply. It takes film, has a film advance lever, is designed with lots of metal, and has no light meter built in–just like many of the older cameras. Think that that’s a waste of your money? Think again–especially when you consider the fact that the camera could be used by people many generations from now with no major problems to the machinery.

No–this isn’t a camera meant for the new breed that rely on meters; it’s designed for those photographers who used the tried and true Sunny 16 methods to capture scenes in every day life. And despite it’s near $5,000 price tag, it makes complete sense if you consider that many of the much older Leicas still go for a lot of money and that this is a made with brand new materials.

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All images by Bellamy Hunt, the Japan Camera Hunter. Used with permission.

If anyone in the world runs across rare and unique camera items, it’s Bellamy Hunt. Recently, he shared an image of a rare Leica IIIc Red Curtain Rangefinder with Nazi Navy/Marine markings on it. It’s worth it to note though that none of these cameras came out of Leica’s factory with the engravings. In fact, they were all added later on.

This particular rangefinder has the Nazi symbol with M underneath it–signifying that it was a camera for someone in the Navy. Bellamy tells us that the engraving was most likely done by a jeweler for the owner. But he also thinks that the symbol was added after the specific trend of engraving a Nazi symbol onto the camera was booming–which could potentially make it a fake. In fact, many fake copies came out of Russia.

While this is a real Leica camera, he still believes that the engraving was added after the trend (though still manufactured during war time) because the font isn’t just like the one used on many other cameras out there.

You can check this and other items out that Bellamy has for sale at this specific page.

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Leica M Jony Ive Front

A while ago we told you about a one-off Leica M Typ 240 desined by Apple’s Jony Ive and designer Marc Newson, the guy who styled the Pentax K-01 camera. We didn’t think that this unique Leica was considerably pretty back then. Well, now the camera has been sold at Sotheby’s, and guess what the final bid was … Oh right, we already gave it away in the title. So there you have it. An incredibly ugly Leica M that will be technically obsolete in a couple years was sold for almost two million dollars.

But consider this: it was a charity auction, with all proceedings going directly toThe Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. So whoever placed that final bid will be reminded of their good deed each time they pick up their new camera. That is, unless it’s going to be put in a safe so nobody can steal it. Which we think would be a really good idea, because you wouldn’t want to be seen with that ugly brick in your hand.

Via Leica Rumors

Felix Esser The Phoblographer Leica M Typ 240 Review Front Slanted View

When we recently wrote about our first impressions with the Leica M Typ 240, we were pretty smitten with it. So much so in fact that we were almost certain we wouldn’t have much else to say in the final review besides what we said about it in our first impressions article. So what we’ll do is to give you some extra image samples from the camera and various lenses, go a bit more into detail about the overall image quality, as well as take a look at the camera’s video functionality, which makes it stand apart from all the M-mount rangefinder cameras that came before it.

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