Review: Lensbaby Trio (Fujifilm X Mount)

Lensbaby has always had a very interesting lineup of optics; and the Lensbaby Trio is no exception. Lensbaby has never gone for the clinically perfect and sharp optics but instead sharp optics with a twist–pun not intended. Sometimes they’re super soft, sometimes they’re very sharp and you can throw the focus off in one way or another. But with the Trio, you’re getting an interesting combination. You get a set of 28mm f3.5 optics that switch out turret style. You’ve got the ability to focus but not to change the aperture setting at all.

What this results in are either your preference for one optic over the other or you wanting to have a lot of fun.

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How to Shoot Golden Hour Portraits That Require Less Editing

Spring is here; it’s a time for golden hour portraits and photographers to get excited about chasing the light in the creation of the killer photo. Many photographers love shooting during the Golden Hour especially due to its ability to deliver soft, golden light and to make a person’s skin tones look fantastic. When it comes to photographing people in traditional portrait settings, there’s something much more appealing about warmer lighting situations than cooler lighting. While cooler lighting surely has its place, warmer lighting is often more flattering.

So if you want to go out there and create better golden hour photos, here’s how to do it while also spending less time in Lightroom or Capture One.

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Jett Inong’s ANXIETY Combines Street Photography with Creative Color Usage

All images by Jett Inong. Used with permission. Editor’s Note: In a previous version of this article, we misspelled Jett’s last name. We apologize for this mistake. 

“Photography to me is a very complex form that consists of vast amount of visual language,” explains Jett Inong. “It is more eloquent than verbal language itself. When we look into a manual to build or fix something, we are most likely reliant to the photographs rather than the typed words for instructions.” In fact, Jett has a great point. No one likes to read a manual; and so it indeed is a type of language–one that’s easily conveyed in his series, ANXIETY.

Jett explains how that’s why he got into photography in the first place–the infinite capability to articulate one’s most visceral thoughts with just a click of a button, as he describes it.

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Vintage Camera Review: Fujifilm GW690 III (6×9 Medium Format)

When Fujifilm announced their medium format digital camera, a whole lot of people really wanted it to be something along the lines of the Fujifilm GW690 III camera–also known as the Texas Leica. This rangefinder camera shoots in the 6×9 format–which is one of the largest formats to use 120 film. For many years it was used by hobbyists, travel photographers, landscape photographers, and even a few portrait shooters. Due to its 90mm lens equivalent, you’re getting around a 38mm f1.2 equivalent when it comes to field of view converted to full frame.

When I purchasef this camera, I genuinely thought it would be the perfect medium format rangefinder for me, doing pretty much everything the Mamiya 7 II is capable of sans interchangeable lenses. But with more experience, I learned that I was wrong.

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Perfect Portraits: 4 Budget Portrait Lenses For the Fujifilm X System under $1,000

Portrait photography is no doubt one of the niches in photography that attract many aspirants to the industry, both as hobbyists and professionals–and finding budget friendly portrait lenses can be tough. That said, the majority of new photographers simply doesn’t have the budget to spend on top class professional portrait lenses, so today we are taking a look at some of the best budget oriented portrait lenses for the Fujifilm X-Series. If you have another camera system no worries, we will be following this up with budget portrait lens roundups for other systems as well.

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JP Stones Documents Aztec Culture in Mexico Through Stunning Portraiture

All images by JP Stones. Used with permission.

“Mexico has a deep and fascinating history,” explains photographer JP Stones in his email to us. “None more fascinating than the Aztecs meteoric rise to empire, and equally spectacular fall. Many Aztec traditions and ceremonies held such a vital place within Mexican culture that they have survived over 600 years through to today.” In the hippie Mexican beach town of Sayulita, a partnership has been forged between the local Azteca community and photographers JP Stones and Brei Barron. JP describes the result as a series of cinematic photos depicting a cultural movement thriving beneath the surface of Mexico’s everyday life.

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Review: Kodak Ektar 100 (35mm and 120; Various Formats)

For a really long time, if you wanted very vivid colors in your film photos you needed to go to a slide film–but when Kodak introduced Kodak Ektar 100 things changed. Photographers were able to get punchy, vibrant, saturated colors with the ease of use that negative film provides. To this day, Kodak Ektar 100 is used to a variety of applications with one of the most common ones being landscapes. However it is also in use for portraiture as its low ISO value allows for incredibly sharp photos.

And for many lovers of digital cameras, this may also be one of your favorite Kodak film emulsions.

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Film Review: Kodak Portra 400 (35mm and 120, Various Formats)

Years and years ago, Kodak announced something that would endure for quite a while: Kodak Portra 400. Available in the 120, 35mm, and large formats, the film was and still is incredibly popular with photographers who like shooting portraits. It’s highly valued for its muted tones–which tends to go against much of what digital photography seems to offer straight out of the camera. However, Portra is in use for much more than just this. Lots of photographers use it as their every day film because they just like it. But this tends to be more the thought process of those that shoot 35mm. At 120, you’re getting far less shots per roll and often work to get the best photos you can in one single shot due to higher stakes–even more so than with 35mm.

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