web analytics

portraits

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon G1X review images (18 of 28)ISO 1001-8 sec at f - 2.0

The Golden Hour is one of the best times for you to go out and shoot photos. But this weekend, you only have a small window to time to go out there and do it. So make the most of it! Here are some projects to get you started! [click to continue…]

Sigma 85mm vs Sigma 50mm lens

We’ve had some heated debates recently on the site’s Facebook page when it comes to 85mm vs 50mm lenses. We tested it out ourselves a very long time ago, but recently another posting made readers wonder about it more themselves. To figure out which lens can render a better image when it comes to portraits, we tested two lenses from the same manufacturer to put an end to the debate once and for all.

So the real question is: Which lens is better for portraits? The 85mm vs 50mm Lens?

Editor’s Note: this is a formal comparison test not done in a lab, but instead in a real life situation. Real life situations simulate shooting subjects and not test charts. Frankly, if you’re purchasing a lens just to shoot charts all day you need to open a gallery of your test chart images and see someone’s reaction to them.

[click to continue…]

EvanRosler_140805-219

All images by Bill Wadman. Used with permission.

NYC Photographer Bill Wadman is no stranger to the Phoblographer. He’s been featured here a number of times. First was on Creating the Photograph, then on his post on dynamic range, and this time around we’re captivated by his Portraits in the Corner series that he has been featuring for a while now on his blog. The idea was incredibly simple: get a bunch of folks, choose a corner, and shoot a portrait that tells a bit about who they are as people. Bill used photojournalism, traditional portrait posing and environmental portrait tactics to get the images in the series.

Unlike many other photographers, Bill did something that few of us have the fortitude to do. He worked through his obstacles and still commits.

We talked to Bill about Portraits in a Corner and the commitment it took.

[click to continue…]

Wolfie

All images by Stuart Holroyd. Used with permission

Photographer Stuart Holroyd is a 34 year old British photographer currently based in Cyprus. He’s on a mission to help some pooches–but we’re talking about a whole lot of them. Mr. Holroyd’s work started off very bizarre and gothic according to him, but one wouldn’t think that it would evolve into beautiful portraits of dogs. After a very personal and life changing experience, Stuart decided to dedicate his photography to helping others.

That’s how to Bay Tree Project was started. According to Stuart, it was “an idea I came up with to try and help Bay Tree Rescue centre in Larnaca, Cyprus. Over here there are no animal cruelty laws so unfortunately you will find hurt animals almost everywhere you go.”

To help the dogs, an elderly woman by the name of Kayte who lives in a hut at the bottom of the rescue center with no electricity has chosen to aid some of the dogs–sometimes even putting their health before her own. As a result, Kayte is fostering over 70 dogs on donations from her friends and her UK pension.

The images after the jump are part of those that will be in an exhibit in February. “We will auction off original signed work for each of these images, and the event will be a worldwide auction with online and telephone bidding allowed so we can increase exposure and hopefully raise more money.” says Stuart.

Stuart’s images profile the dogs in a beautiful fashion against an equally dreamy background. And any dog lover really can’t resist.

[click to continue…]

KEITH_EVERYTIMEIDIE

Keith, Every Time I Die

All images by Brandon Andersen. Used with permission

Some photographers love going to concerts to snap photos of their favorite performers on stage. But Brandon Andersen had a totally different idea. Upon going to the Vans Warped Tour, Mr. Andersen said that he wanted to do something different from every photographer on tour: and indeed he did. When he talked with the main photographer that he was interning for, he was recommended to do a portrait series. So he dug up a V-Flat that he hung on a fence, his 5D Mk III and a 24-70mm f2.8 L II then photographed musicians before and after their performances.

Mr. Andersen tells us that getting access to the musicians was actually the easy part because he had been touring with artists on and off for around two years. “I have made friends along the way. So on the first day I joined the Vans Warped Tour I knocked out some of the before and after portraits with friends that were performing.” states Brandon. “They loved them, told other artists and they were more than down to be in the project. I also had a copy of the portraits on my phone so I could ask an artist and show him/her on the spot, More than likely they were thrilled to be apart of it.”

More of the portraits are after the jump. But also be sure to check out Brandon on Instagram.

[click to continue…]

slide_353744_3849996_free

All photographs taken by Ken Heyman. Used with permission.

Since the 50s, award-winning photographer Ken Heyman’s powerful photographs have graced numerous publications, museum and gallery exhibits, and books–his subjects ranging from human conditions in the poorer parts of the world to happy occasions celebrated in well-to-do ones.

The assortment of the subjects and themes in Ken’s photographs deliver very visible differences that emphasize just how very diverse our world is. But many of these photographs also beautifully highlight the similarities in human interactions and relationships.

Take the inspiring and tender collection of black and white images he’d taken of mothers and their kids, for example. Captured several decades years ago while working on a book called “Family” with his former Columbia professor and close friend Margaret Mead, Ken only recently rediscovered them while emptying the contents of a storage unit.

The photos from the collection, lying in wait in a box labeled “Mothers,” were taken in over 60 countries and of women and children that belong to different races and cultures. When looking through them, however, you begin to fathom the startling likeness in all of them.

Ken’s collection is hard proof that despite backgrounds, cultures, and skin colors, a mother’s love and the bond between her and her children remains the same.

[click to continue…]