Bruno Fujii: Taking Portraits at a Slow Pace, And Personal Connections

All images and text by Bruno Fujii. Used with permission.

I’m Bruno Fujii from Brazil trying to develop a cohesive body of work that relates directly to my personality and beliefs. I started learning photography 3 years ago while in a full time job. It didn’t take too long after I decided to invest almost all my money and vacation days into a personal photography project. After I came back from the vacation I got fired, since then I’m trying to work full time as an independent photographer.

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Film Review: Fujifilm Provia 100f (35mm and 120 Formats)

There’s been a big personal void in my life when it comes to slide film since the first death of Kodak Ektachrome, and I haven’t been able to fill for a while. But perhaps the closest thing to filling that gap is Fujifilm Provia 100f. Lots of folks love negative film; but I’ve always been more partial to slide film. Slide film is sort of like a badge of honor: you have to get the exposure perfectly right and most of the time the camera doesn’t really do it. With negative film and the development process, you’ve got a lot more versatility. But with slide film, you have maybe one stop extra in either direction. Perhaps this is one of the trademarks of what makes film so fun–you have to get the image right and the editing process isn’t as simple as it is in digital.

But either way, I’m genuinely in love with Fujifilm Provia 100. Like any other film though, I adore it in medium format much more than in 35mm.

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Portrait Focal Lengths, Putting Myths Aside For Clarity

Surely you have run into this situation while trying to get a better handle on what sort of lenses and gear you should invest in for portraits. You have a small space and you are asking for wide angle lens suggestions and everyone goes off the deep end about not using wide angle lenses for portrait without actually explaining why; or by using over simplified responses like ‘bad distortion!’ Continue reading…

Sample Image Gallery: Nikon 28mm f1.4 E Lens (Nikon F Mount)

We’ve been playing with the new Nikon 28mm f1.4 E lens for a little while now and are honestly completely blown away by the image quality. The Nikon 28mm f1.4 E lens is incredibly sharp wide open, but is also has great bokeh and an overall very nice look I genuinely feel will make a whole lot of sense for portrait photographers, documentary photographers, photojournalists and street photographers. Street photographers: yes. The look is really stunning.

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Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 in 120 Medium Format Film is Available for Pre-Order

Bellamy Hunt told us that Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 120 would be coming soon, and today he’s announcing that it’s available for pre-order. The film, which is popular with the 35mm film photography world, has finally sold enough that Bellamy decided that it would make sense to have it in a larger film emulsion. Street Pan 400 is unlike many of the others out there with the exception of a few Ilford emulsions. Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 is a near infrared film that needs a lot of light unlike Kodak Tri-X, Fujifilm Acros and a number of others. So if you’re using it then you’ll need to give it more light or expose it at box speed vs pushing it.

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 Getting the Most Out of Golden Hour Using Only Natural Light

Anthony Thurston Natural Light Golden Hour

Screenshot taken from the video

Right up there with buying a 50mm lens and the rule of thirds, probably one of the most thrown around recommendations in photography is photographing your subjects during golden hour. It is one of the most common times of day to see photographers out looking for images but it also comes with some interesting challenges that newer photographers may struggle with. Continue reading…

Creating Sharper Looking Portrait Photos Using Low Key Lighting

Low key lighting in portrait photography can do one really big thing for your subject: make them pop out from the background a whole lot more. I mean, isn’t that the whole point of portraiture? To make someone stand out and be the primary subject? When combined with very specific lighting, your subject can really come across front and center so to speak. So for the most part, I want you to imagine that an actor or actress is on stage for a bit of theatre. A spotlight comes in on them and the rest of the stage isn’t lit at all. In fact, it’s incredibly dark. So more or less, you’re really just seeing your subject and nothing else. That’s how low key lighting works.

So here’s how you make it work to create better portraits.

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