Charming Photo Series Showcases The Smiling Personas of the Elderly


Images by Ilya Nodia and Irina Muravyova. Used under a Creative Commons License. 

A smile is probably the most common trait to us humans, and it is a universal language that never gets old. Ilya Nodia was invited by the Senior Group to shoot a small photo project with them, capturing beautiful and very touching smiles of the elders.

This project takes Ilya to several nursing home visits, spending a few hours in each home shooting portraits of the elders in their cozy living space which was briefly turned into a mobile photography studio. The elders had so much fun putting on straw hats, powdering their cheeks, and looking their best for the photo shoot. Most importantly, Ilya managed to capture the great atmosphere created by the bright, dazzling smiles of his aged models that never grow old.  Continue reading…

Evelyn Bencicova Captures Her Subject’s True Selves In Truthness


All Images By Evelyn Bencicova. Used Under A Creative Commons License

There are many photographers who can take a technically perfect picture, with stellar lighting and optimal composition. But the mark of a true professional, of someone who has earned their stripes, is the ability to pull emotion from their subjects, the ability to have their subjects so comfortable that they open themselves up to the photographer, sharing their true selves. Continue reading…

How to Photograph Cosplayers at Comic Con

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer NYCC New York Comic Con 2013 exports (14 of 84)ISO 1001-200 sec at f - 5.6

Photographing cosplayers at Comic Con and other conventions leans two different ways: capturing people on the floor and then trying to create images that stand out from all the rest. Most photographers that take pride in their portraits often try to do something that looks good off the main floor where everyone else is. The great thing about comic con is that pretty much everyone is alright with you taking their picture. It’s even better when you ask someone–let alone less creepy!

With NYCC going on at the time of publishing this piece, here are some tips.

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Xpert Advice: Less is More – Using Color Effectively in Portraits


If you look at the work of some of the master portrait photographers, you’ll notice that much of their work tries to keep the use of color very minimal. Why? Portraiture is a type of photography that involves putting an emphasis on a person or thing and when the colors in the scene are very complicated, the scene can be distracting to the viewer. In fact, specific films were developed to create better skin tones and colors for portraiture. Some of the best from Fujifilm were Astia and Fujifilm Pro400H.

So how do you make that happen in-camera?

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Train Full Of Emotions Is a Series of Telling Portraits Shot on a Train


All images by Skander Khlif. Used with Creative Commons License. 

Choice of location for street photography shooting is extremely important, and Skander Khlif chose to shoot photos on a train. This isn’t necessarily a new concept–loads of photographers do this while commuting. But in this series of street photographs titled, “Train Full Of Emotions,” Skander managed to capture emotions in the eyes and behaviours of travelers in a train departing to Jaipur, India.

Skander moved very close to the people he photographed on the train, and he successfully established the direct eye contact in most of his portrait shots of strangers. He typically employs tight framing resulting in clean composition, drawing the attention to the facial expression and the sparkle of catch-light in the eyes of his subjects.

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Portrait Photographer Tracie Maglosky on Using the New Olympus 25mm f1.2


All images by Tracie Maglosky. Used with permission.

One of the more exciting announcements to come out of Photokina is the arrival of the new Olympus 25mm f1.2 PRO lens. This surely is a lens that many have been waiting for for a long time and considering the design, it seems very worth it. Olympus went through the trouble of completely redesigning the lens to make only a single element move when it focuses. This ensures that the lens has fast focusing. Surely, you also get the light gathering benefits of f1.2 and weather sealing. With the Four Thirds crop, you’re getting the equivalent of f2.4 on a full frame camera–which means that there is no real reason to stop the lens down when shooting portraits or anything for that matter.

But to get more insight in to how the lens works, we talked to Olympus Visionary Tracie Maglosky about how she’s using it for her work.

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Review: Sony 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 G OSS (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 FE lens review (1 of 10)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.8

There is very little on the market that can truly be compared to the Sony 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 G OSS lens; and for that reason it’s truly considered something unique. Very little, if anything at all, even compares to this lens in the mirrorless camera world.

For a little over $1,000 you’re getting a dust and splash resistant lens with quite a zoom range and a fairly compact size. Sure, it’s not an internal zooming lens but it’s still not too bad. On top of that, it’s designed for full frame mirrorless cameras. Considering Sony’s reputation, you can bet that it’s also going to be pretty darn good.

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Gretchen Robinette’s Beautiful Portraits of Afro Punk Festival Goers


All images by Gretchen Robinette. Used with permission.

Photographer Gretchen Robinette is a hard working photojournalist and music photographer here in NYC; and recently she took to the Afro Punk Festival to photograph many of the festival goers. According to Gretchen, only one man said no to her during the festival. You may already be familiar with her Unlimited Metrocard series, which focuses on street photographs of people on the subway.

We asked her about how she went about doing the portraits, why she chose the people she did, about the equipment, and about the similarities between musicians and festival goers.

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