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Pinhole

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All images by Jon Wilkening. Used with permission.

Photographer Jon Wilkening is a 32-year former banker turned photographer living just outside of Philadelphia. He used to do photography in college, but it took a backseat after graduation so that he could focus on his banking job. However, it ended up draining him a bit too much–so he quit his job and threw himself right back into photography.

Jon tells us that he uses light and chemistry to reveal how magical the world can be. These actions are easily applicable to his project called “Handheld.” He describes it to us as a project where he used a pinhole camera to capture street photos that result in having an impressionist feeling.

We talked to Jon about the series; which we find to be such a great reminder that street photography doesn’t need to be tack sharp and technically perfect.

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Screen Shot 2015-07-13 at 12.00.25 PM

The folks over at COOPH are at it again with a new video showcasing a couple of really cool and interesting ways to use a smartphone to take better photos. Have you ever thought about attaching it to a balloon to get a higher perspective than what you usually can? Or what about turning your phone into a pinhole camera with a little attachment? These are only two of the tricks that they feature.

These tips are bound to inspire anyone that scoffs at smartphone photography because of just how creative lots of the ideas are. Those that have played with cameras that have inherent technological limitations will also really enjoy the roundup. The video, which is after the jump, includes a bunch of cool and really fun ways to create different photos than what everyone else can do with their phones. Give some of these a try this weekend.

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ONDU 6x6 POCKET 3

ONDU pinhole cameras made their debut a while back, and eventually took off into success. But now, the company is trying to create a newer and more improved version of the cameras and has already received the necessary funding through Kickstarter. To make the ONDU cameras even better, the company is doing a fairly large overhaul to the cameras to make them better to use.

For starters, they’re adding in more magnets that help to securely close the back panel and therefore not accidentally let light leak in from the back or sides. They’re also changing up the shutter mechanism, creating better pinholes and making framing easier by putting a guide on top of the camera for you to get a better idea of how wide you’re shooting.

Besides this, winding the film will be smoother and you’ll be getting an improved finish for even more durability. This all is totally in line with what ONDU first tried to create: pinhole cameras that will last generations. Pledging as low as $60 can get you a camera. Their video is after the jump.

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Pinhole coastline

Pinhole photography requires you to think about motion, careful composition, and at the same time be willing to experiment with your luck. You’re often shooting at a lower ISO setting and with an extremely narrow aperture to create the images that you get. Most of it is also quite wide, too. But to get better pinhole photos, what you need to do is think about your scenes and start seeing the world in a totally different way considering that your camera isn’t capturing a more conventional image.

And if you’re looking for cameras, then check out these modern and DIY cameras.

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Wood Pinhole-2014-X3

Pinhole photography is one of the earliest forms of the art and involves being truly creative about looking at scenes. It often involves an extremely narrow aperture of f162 or even narrower along with a long exposure time to capture what’s in the frame. Depth of field is determined by using composition techniques and often the cameras don’t have a lens or focusing of any sort.

Many folks tend to DIY their own pinhole cameras using things like beer cans and much more. But if you’re not the type of tinker around with tools then here are three pinhole cameras that are very worthy of note.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer LCDVF Fader ND Mamiya (7 of 11)

With our focus being heavily on analog this month, we thought that we’d round up a collection of stories in order to educate those looking ot know more about the format and for those that are already smitten with it. 35mm, medium format, large format, pinhole, instant film: it’s all covered here. But beyond this, we’ve also got a couple of fun projects and inspiration for the photographer looking to simply try something new.

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