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photoshop

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Images used with permission from Eugene Smith

Double exposure images are fun and super creative once you get the right hang of it, but a new Photoshop action is looking to make double exposure work really simple. Photographer Eugene Smith has created this simple action, and for $4, you can create better double exposures and then fine tune them accordingly in Photoshop.

Of course, you won’t be the photographers who do double exposures in their camera and doing this within digital cameras is also possible if your camera allows it, Now, if you’re a Photoshop user, you can create awesome double exposures with ease.

More details are after the jump.

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All images by Ray Dennis. Used with permission.

Photographer Ray Dennis is a 29 year old creative who hails from Ann Arbor Michigan–and who is currently aspiring to own his own real estate photography business. But his beginnings are rooted in photographing car shows for fun. It became more serious and eventually Ray learned more about lighting and conceptual creativity. He came up with ways to create images that look totally surreal and did them without the use of Photoshop. Instead, Ray strived to get it all in the camera.

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All images by Hayden Williams. Used with permission.

Photographer Hayden Williams is an analog film shooter that believes that the only limitations that everyone has is their creativity. And so he embraces this with his double exposure images. Unlike many modern shooters, Hayden uses film to create the photos that he conjures in his mind. The process is then more organic and involves no use of Photoshop.

But Hayden learned this only after not loving what he did in the popular program.

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Photoshop-Touch-The-Phoblographer

Photoshop is, believe it or not, mostly based off of techniques that photographers did in the darkroom years ago and eventually evolved into a full design platform. Years ago, it was common place for burning and dodging to happen in the darkroom, so was gradient work, saturation work, etc.

Lynda.com did a video highlighting this stuff. They cite things like Bridge being a contact shoot and how film photographers never thought that it would change the way that they worked. In fact, Photoshop and its other programs do pretty much everything that the darkroom can–even smart upscaling, which is comparable to using an enlarger to get a bigger print of an image.

Their video on all the darkroom techniques is after the jump.

Via ISO 1200

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creativelive

Next week is Photoshop Week in celebration of the fact that the program that everyone tries to get for free has turned 25 years old.

Starting on February 23 and ending on the 28th, creativeLive is offering totally free Photoshop and Lightroom tutorials with the option of purchasing individual classes for $19 each or all 49 for $299 later on. Instructors like Julieanne Kost, Matt Kloskowski, Ben Willmore, and Julia Kuzmenko McKim are going to be demoing tutorials.

Each day there are up to eight tutorials at 9AM, 10:45 AM, 1PM, and 2:45PM. If you want to check them out live, then the best thing to do is head over to the schedule and RSVP for the events.

Education like this usually costs hundreds of dollars with private instructors, but these are some of the best in the business and it’s going to be available for you for free.

julius motal the phoblographer hope carter icebubbles-1

Don’t burst Hope Carter’s bubble. Seriously, don’t do it because if you do, she’ll have to start the process all over again, and it’s cold outside. Carter has been experimenting with the very precise art of photographing bubbles in freezing temperatures, which was inspired by some classes she helped teach in her children’s schools. She took camera into the freezing outdoors, where she would blow bubbles that would then crystallize, and before they disappeared, she clicked the shutter. No two bubbles are alike. Each gives rise to a different kind of icy landscape.

Here we interview Carter about her series “Frozen Frosted Fun”, and for more of her work, check out her website[click to continue…]