A Simple Mind Hack to Always Keep You Motivated to Shoot Photos

This post is short, sweet, and to the point: if you want to ever stop being dominated by creative ruts as a photographer the best thing you can possibly do for yourself is to surround yourself in positivity and creative energy. Sounds crazy, right? You could say that, but it’s the truth and every business owner who has weathered being within inches of bankruptcy will tell you exactly that.

So how do photographers surround themselves with positivity?

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The Epson Expression 12000XL Scans Really Large Photo Prints

Today, Epson is announcing their brand new 12000XL large format scanner designed to scan large documents and photo prints. Capable of scanning 12.2 x 17.2 inch images with 2400 x 4800 DPI, you’re bound to be able to either load a bunch of prints onto here or just scan really large photos. There are two versions: the Expression 12000XL-GA designed for professional graphic artists, museums, and forensic labs, and the Expression 12000XL-PH designed for photographers and film preservationists.

Considering our audience, you’re probably going to want to go for the latter–which will result in you shelling out $3,429. The press release is after the jump.

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Understanding the Difference Between Terrible Photos and Something You Just Don’t Like

Most photographers go about trying to become better by starting out with putting their work online. They share via Instagram, 500px, Flickr, Reddit, Facebook Groups, etc. Depending on where you venture into, the levels of toxicity may vary. You could be a portrait photographer posting an image for critique online but actually just be critiqued by a landscape photographer. And for a few seconds, you’ll sit there and read a glaring, sharp tongued remark about your image and how terrible it is. But in all honestly, your image probably isn’t terrible at all–it’s probably just something that person doesn’t like at all.

The first time this happened to me was in college; except that it wasn’t online–it was in a classroom. Photojournalism 101 was the course I was taking and I was assigned to do a project on some sort of important happening in my college. Like many other people that attended that class, my work was ripped apart by the professor. It’s one thing for someone to hide behind some sort of online avatar and spew nothing bit acidic hatred towards your photography, but it’s a whole different thing to get it in real life. For what it’s worth, it’s far more demeaning and disheartening.

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Canon Wants You To Print Your Images On Premium Polished Rag

Canon today announced three new fine art premium photo papers for photographers who want to stand out from the crowd by actually printing their work, rather than having it live out its life digitally.

Premium Fine Art Smooth, Premium Fine Art Bright White and Premium Polished Rag are papers that Canon is saying have been designed to help photographers not just print their work, but to help their work have that premium ‘artwork’ look and feel. They are also all acid-free and archival quality, so photographers can print with confidence knowing that the prints can withstand the tests of time.

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MEAT: 5 Tips for Better Pictures

This is a guest blog post from Xavier D. Buendia. It and the images here are being syndicated with exclusive permission to the Phoblographer.

In the last couple of days I was exposed to meat in all its forms as I had several different shoots with it as the main subject. From a “simple” Sunday roast at a pub to a review of a Brazilian rodizio restaurant. A t-bone on a barbecue with some friends and a shoot at a steakhouse finishing with another review at a top steak restaurant… all in less than 10 days! These made me come to a conclusion: grilled, braised, slow cooked, or on a barbecue; meat can be a pain in the neck to photograph.

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Useful Photography Tip #164: 5 Tips for Better Photos of FireWorks Using Your Phone

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here. Image by Andy Karmy.

For everyone here in America, Happy July 4th! But if you’re not reading this on the 4th, then consider these quick tips on taking better photos of fireworks with your mobile phone.

  • Use a manual settings app: Use an app that lets you set at least the focus manually. This way your phone isn’t searching in the darkness for the fireworks to appear. You can also use said app to adjust settings like shutter speed, locking ISO, etc. Go for long shutter speeds and a lower ISO setting. In general, underexpose just a bit.
  • Stabilize your phone: I’m not expecting everyone to use a tripod with their phone so instead just remember to tuck your elbows in when you shoot. This will keep the cameraphone much more stable. Also be sure to hold it with both hands.
  • Use the burst shot ability: Using burst helps a whole ton when it comes to getting the exact photo you care about a lot.
  • Scope Out and Claim a Spot: By ensuring that you get a good spot to watch the fireworks, you don’t have to worry about issues like people getting in the way of your images. Of course, that is if you’re super serious. This tip especially goes out to those of us (like me) who are vertically challenged.
  • Turn Your Flash Off: It’s honestly rather useless at that far of a range. That little LED bulb isn’t going to light up the night sky.

How to Get Better Photos of Fireworks

Lead photo by Michal Ziembicki.

If you’re in the Western Hemisphere, you’re probably celebrating your nation’s Independence Day very soon. Naturally, you’re going to want to take photos and share them on the web for all your friends to like, comment, heart, etc. It’s often a joyous time for all of us; and it should surely be one for you too.

Here are a few tips on how to take better images of fireworks.

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How to Get Featured in National Geographic

In partnership with Format MagazineClick here to build your Format portfolio website today with a free 14-day trial, no credit card required.

This is a syndicated blog post from Format Magazine. It’s contents are being used with exclusive permission. All images used with permission from Format

Sarah Leen, the magazine’s director of photography, gave us the inside scoop.

If you’re a photographer who’s serious about documenting unique people and places, getting published in National Geographic is pretty much the Holy Grail of career goals. To find out what it takes to get featured, we called up the magazine’s director of photography Sarah Leen.

Leen has a long history with the magazine—her first published story was a result of a college internship there in 1979. As a photojournalist, she’s travelled extensively, documenting lifestyles and landscapes in diverse locations ranging from Russia to Uganda to northern Canada.

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