web analytics

photos

MB14.011_Adrift_03

All images by Magda Biernat. Used with permission. © Magda Biernat courtesy the artist and Robert Klein Gallery

What would possess you to go to the cold? If you’re photographer Magda Biernat, then it’s all about having a fascination with structures. Magda is a fellow Magnum Photos alumni (I worked under her for a special project) and has since continued to work on her photography and display it at galleries. Her Adrift series is a compilation of work done in some of the coldest places on Earth that involved capturing stunning images of glaciers and Inupiat eskimo huts.

We talked to Magda about the challenges of shooting in the cold, the logistics, and the biggest scare about doing work like this.



[click to continue…]

Taking a photo with a tablet

The phone camera generation and technology shift created the rise of yet another device: the tablet. And as people took image after image with their phone, so too did those with their tablets. Before we knew it, tablets were with people everywhere they went. So the photos they shot during vacations, concerts, at restaurants, events, the kid’s first recital, and even more were shot on tablets.

Stop.

For the love of everything that Steve Jobs created you’re blocking my line of vision of whatever we’re all here to see. And sometimes you don’t even want to just shoot a photo. You want to shoot the same photo over and over again. Further, you sometimes want to record a video–you know how long you’re holding your tablet up to record a video? That entire time, I probably can’t see what’s in front of me. Or even if we’re in a sea of darkness, your super bright tablet in total darkness is a complete distraction.

That and you just look absolutely ridiculous when doing it. A tablet is not ergonomically designed for you to hold it outstretched from your body to take a photo and if anything, you’re completely overcompensating with the screen size.

Please. Please. Just stop it.

Grand-Place, Brussels

Grand-Place, Brussels, Belgium

Before, during and after you go on a trip, there are a few things to consider to improve your pictures as a photographer, no matter where the place is. Why do some people seem to get crappy shots, others seem to have loads of postcard shots while some people take off to the beaten path with creative shots? How can I get those iconic shots while still maintaining creative control on what you shoot? Without saying more, here are some ways to improve your travel photography.

[click to continue…]

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Check them out here.

Lots of folks say that you should only use a flash during the evening hours and in dark situations. But the truth of the matter is that during the daytime is perhaps the best time to use flash. For example, let’s say that you want to photograph someone and there is bright sunlight in the scene. If you make them face the sun, they’ll squint a lot. Conversely, if you make them not face the sun, you’ll need to overexpose a lot to get the details on their face–which is called backlighting. The solution then is to backlight the subject and expose normally while illuminating their front with a flash. That way, you get a more balanced image overall in terms of exposure ratings.

But besides this, using a flash during the day only adds to the beauty that natural light can deliver. It can bring out details in your subject that you wouldn’t see otherwise (specular highlights) and it can also fill in shadows when done correctly to give a very beautiful and shadowless look. But to do this, you’ll need to either set your flash to the widest zoom head angle or bounce it off of  very wide surface. Alternatively, you could also use a softbox of some sort.

When adding flash to a daylight scene, it’s best to add it a little bit at a time–gradually making it stronger until you feel that you have something close to the image that you want.

Try this quick tip, and be sure to check out our other bite sized useful photography tips.

8399599174_1c7060da50_h

All images by Giancarlo Rado. Used with permission.

“I’ve taken pictures for many years, my mother always told me that in her young years she was developing and retouching photographs in her cousin’s laboratory, and still colorizing portraits with special inks; so it was just a familiar tradition, which still survives in me even if I am a musician,” says Giancarlo Rado on how he got into photography. He explains that it’s like telling stories–and a story is what he’s telling in his series entitled, “Waiting for Summer.”

Toting around a Hasselblad SLR with a 80mm lens, Mr. Rado loves the square format. And when working on the series, he states that it’s like taking a portrait of a landscape. He believes in the existential idea that the earth, sky, and sea all connect along with ideals and feelings deeply involved in our minds when traveling to the beach during the winter. With that said, he often searches the beach looking for relationships that he thinks will evoke stories.

“I go to the beach mainly for the horizontal light that I know that soon or later will come. This light allows the evocation of shadows and situations particularly important for me,” states Mr. Rado. “I know very well the places where I shall go and sooner or later the expected situation will appear–like and astral conjunction of phenomena which may reflect feeling such as loneliness, fear, peace, quietness, and what else connected with the never fading border between interior and exterior world.”

Giancarlo’s photos evoke the sense of loneliness and indeed search for relationships. The series is after the jump.

[click to continue…]

Nikon-FM2-like-digital-full-frame-camera-rumors

Last year, Nikon has a photography contest in the same fashion that they do every single year since 1969. But in the recent years, they’ve started to ban the use of film cameras in their contests. Each year that this happened, photographers have begged and pleaded to allow the format to be accepted again. However, Nikon’s contest rules and information states that

Both color and monochrome images will be accepted. We will not be accepting any entries taken on film.Scans of photographs taken by film cameras are not eligible.”

Essentially, the contest has become a full on digital camera situation for both stills and video. But considering that you can win the equivalent of 1,000,000 yen; we wonder why it really matters if you’ve shot with film or not. Nikon is also really trying to target the younger photographers by offering them the equivalent of 300,000 yen in free Nikon products.

This year’s contest is about home. So an entire theme around this may be simpler to create with a video than stills.

If you want to enter, you can check out the rest of the guidelines.