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Heading into a concert? We’ve got good news and bad news for you.

Let’s start with the good news: you’re about to see what will hopefully be an awesome show.

The bad news: the venue may not let your pro-grade camera in. In fact, even as long as it looks pro grade, you’ll need to check it. So for that reason, you’ll need something a bit more low-profile that will fool the guards when they check your bag. The only way to do that is to not have such a serious looking piece of kit on you, but still having something comparable to the cameras that you may use.

Here are a list of cameras that won’t get checked at a concert.

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Felix Esser The Phoblographer Lenses Apertures

Consumers who are always concerned about when their camera will become outdated should not only be aware of the technology that has been progressing in sensor performance, but also whether or not lens R&D will be able to keep up. A question dawned on us one day: with sensor technology moving ahead at such a fast pace, will lens technology be able to do the same? Years ago, it was common for a lens to last a photographer 10 years until the next refresh. But in more recent years, we’ve been seeing shorter lifespans of around five years. Part of this is due to developments in autofocusing and sensor technology.

But at the same time, should photographers be afraid that their collection of glass will become obsolete? We talked to the folks at Olympus, Fujifilm, Panasonic, Sigma and Tokina about this.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When a photographer travels they often want to carry a compact camera that is low profile, has great image quality, is reliable, and that they can tote around to both have fun and be artistic. Despite how much we always talk about DSLRs and mirrorless cameras, they can slow you down so much more when compared to a good point and shoot fixed lens camera. While the typical moniker of a point and shoot camera has always been one that has been looked down on by many of the more bourgeois amongst us, these cameras have indeed become much better over the years. In fact, these compact cameras are so good now that it’s arguable that you don’t need an interchangeable lens camera.

Here are our favorite point and shoots that will make the travelling photographer drool.

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Screen Shot 2014-09-15 at 12.57.50 PM

The company that really seems to be stealing the show at Photokina 2014 is Panasonic. Today, the company made a surprise announcement that they’re getting back into the cell phone game–sort of. The new CM1 is an Android smartphone with a 10.2mmm f2.8 Leica lens that comes out to an approximately 28mm field of view. Plus said lens has full manual control over aperture, ISO and shutter speed. But beyond that, the company has packed a 1 inch sensor into the camera.

The camera phone can also capture 4k video. And according to their specs page, it runs Android 4.4, has four processors with 2.3 GHz, and a 4.7 inch display. The sample images are also beautiful.

A demo video is after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic GM5 first impressions images (4 of 5)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 5.0

Panasonic has always embraced the philosophy of having small cameras with a very big sensor: and today’s announcement of the GM5 is no different. This camera is targeted at the photographer that wants something incredibly compact–dare we say pocketable. The camera, which is available in either black or red, sports a magnesium body with a 1,165K dot EVF, had a 921K 3 inch touch screen WiFi, 60p video, and allows for editing to be done in the camera.

At its heart is a 16MP Four Thirds size sensor–and that allows the camera to shoot 5fps. When it launches at the start of November, you’ll be able to pick it up at an $899 price point.

Also being announced today is the new Panasonic 14mm f2.5–which has six elements in five groups with 3 aspherical elements. Additionally, it sports seven aperture blades. More info and photos are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic LX100 first impressions product images (4 of 6)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 4.5

It’s been rumored for a very long time, and today Panasonic and the Micro Four Thirds world have launched their direct competitor to the large sensor point and shoots. The Panasonic LX100 is not only directly squared against the other high end point and shoots out there, but it is also the company’s dueling sword to Fujifilm’s X100T.

At its heart is a Micro Four Thirds size sensor (the same 12.8MP sensor in the GX7) with a lens that starts at f1.7 (24mm) and ends at f2.8 (75mm) in its zoom range. The lens has Power OIS too–which is very typical for Panasonic. The camera has has the same processing engine as the GH4–which makes is truly a composite camera.

We got to spend some time with the LX100 at Panasonic’s New Jersey headquarters earlier this month. And trust us, it’s a reason to get hyped.

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