web analytics

olympus

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Though Olympus Air has already been announced in Japan, the little camera that might is finally coming to the US. Very similar to Sony’s QX series of cameras, the Olympus Air product line is an open source camera that takes Micro Four Thirds lenses and is essentially just the sensor, lens mount, WiFi electronics, and a button crammed into ergonomics that will remind you of a can of Burt’s Bees skin moisturizer. The open source designation means that app developers can actually develop apps for the system to make it better.

The Olympus Air A01 is the company’s first offering and has the same 16MP four thirds sensor that many of the company’s other cameras have. However, it doesn’t have Image stabilization in order to keep the unit small. If you mount Panasonic’s lenses that have IS built in though, you’ll get the image stabilization that your shaky hands crave so badly. When it links up with your phone, tablet or phablet you’ll be able to see what the camera sees on a giant screen.

The camera also has focus peaking, which means that all your manual glass will work fine. Additionally, with the electronic shutter the camera can shoot at 1/16,000 of a second and therefore give the user almost no trouble shooting with a lens wide open in sunlight at a lower ISO setting. The Air A01 can shoot 10 fps, has RAW capture, and uses a Micro SD card.

Pretty much everything that you’d expect with an Olympus Micro Four Thirds camera is transferred to the phone when they let their powers combine.

The Olympus Air A01 will be available in the United States in July 2015 in Black or White for $299.99 (body only) or $499.99 paired with a 14-42mm EZ lens, and in Canada in August 2015 in Black or White for $399.99 (body only) or $599.99 paired with a 14-42mm EZ lens. More photos are after the jump.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Figosa Vintage Leather Adjustable Strap (4 of 10)ISO 1001-200 sec at f - 4.0

Every time a photographer wants to start to experiment with film, new excitement stirs. But at the same time, it’s always wise to take a great educated guess as far as what camera you want to start out with. For starters, consider not only the camera system but the lens system–just like in digital photography. Figuring out what films you want to work with is another headache but one that is significantly easier to do than what camera you’re working with.

For this reason, we’ve come up with our list of the best film cameras for any photographer to start out on.

[click to continue…]

Chris GampatThe Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 lenses (3 of 3)ISO 2001-60 sec at f - 4.0

Great news, the new Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art lens is getting $100 off and going for $849. But be sure to check out our review before you go buy one, our comparison to the original and to the Sigma 35mm f1.4 Art.

Still going on: we’ve found a bundle deal on a Canon 70D Bundle for $789 after a rebate, plus Nikon savingsNikon summer bundle deals as well as so much more.

$400 off the Sony A7r, Zeiss lens rebates, $299 for the Olympus EPL5, a discount on the Fujifilm XT-1, $499 for the Olympus OMD EM5, $200 off on the Fujifilm X100T, Tamron lens discounts, Lexar card specials.

Not a Nikon fan? Then check out Amazon’s best selling cameras, with lots of the under $500. Plus, Adorama has specials on Lowepro camera bags. [click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon G1x product images (1 of 7)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

For the person that wants to get serious about photography, know that you don’t need a DSLR or a mirrorless camera or even one with interchangeable lenses. You won’t necessarily get better image quality and for what it’s worth there are other cameras with DSLR sensors in them that give you a more compact size and great performance. That and you won’t need to figure out the big problems like why you shouldn’t put a lens in one pocket and a camera body in the other pocket with no caps (we can hear the experienced shooters shrieking) or like the intricacies of your diopter.

Indeed, there are fixed lens cameras that can do an incredible job that can take professional quality images and that you can probably even do pro-style work with.

Here’s our list of the best cameras that will help you get serious about photography.

PS: Yes, you want pro-quality. But absolutely nothing will make you shoot like a pro except having creative ideas, vision and knowledge in addition to some very good marketing skills. True pros can shoot with anything you hand them.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 20mm f1.7 II product images first impressions (4 of 5)ISO 4001-500 sec at f - 3.5

Of any mirrorless camera system, the Micro Four Thirds coalition has the most lenses available. Between both Panasonic and Olympus, the system has lots of lenses–but when you consider how open they are to working with third parties then you’ve got even more lenses that are supported. Indeed, new lenses for Micro Four Thirds cameras seem to come out almost every month.

In our years of reviewing lenses, we’ve tested and played with lots of different optics at all different prices. We’ve rounded up our top choices for the best and cheapest lenses for the Micro Four Thirds system. So if you’re looking for the best cheap lenses for Micro Four Thirds cameras, then look no further than right after the jump.

Editor’s Note: In a previous version of this article, we mistook one lens for another. We apologize for our humanity.

[click to continue…]

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

While the world is all amazed with 50MP full frame sensors and a bajillion autofocus points, you may be pleasantly surprised by some technologies that years ago were absolutely incredible and in some ways should be brought back to the world. We’re not talking about putting 1080p HD video into a DSLR, but instead we’re going back much further into time. Plus, we’re exploring how the focusing systems would work in today’s world.

[click to continue…]