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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Great State Classic Skinny strap review images (1 of 8)ISO 1001-100 sec at f - 2.0

We were introduced to Great State camera straps recently through Facebook; and were inspired by their all American made mantra with the classic/minimalist aesthetic and emphasis. Based in Portland, Oregon the company hand makes the straps before boxing them in something almost like a jewelry box and putting a little tag telling you that it will essentially get better with age.

Great State shipped us their Classic Skinny strap, which they sell for $59–and which is very affordable for a strap like this. To be very brief, we’re in love. These straps have elements of both Tap and Dye and Cub and Co in their design; and you should wear yours like a special badge of honor.


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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 15mm f1.7 review product photos (2 of 6)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 3.5

The Panasonic 15mm f1.7 lens is a small, well designed lens for the Micro Four Thirds camera system–and we dare say that it is our favorite autofocusing lens for the system, too. Designed to be almost a pancake but with a wide f1.7 aperture, it pairs very nicely with some of the system’s medium to smaller camera. With nine elements in seven groups and seven aperture blades, it’s a fairly simply designed lens but whatever magic that Panasonic put into it makes the lens sing with pure image quality.

Introduced earlier this year, this lens is very heavily targeted at the street photographer and the person looking to take general candids and images due to its 30mm field of view.

And when our review period is over, we’re going to be very sad to say goodbye to it.


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Olympus Lens Camera

The Olympus lens camera is on step closer to becoming a reality as Egami reports the Japanese camera company has filed a patent for the technology. The new patent reveals the Olympus’ lens camera will work just like the Sony QX1, allowing users mount their lenses onto a standalone camera sensor and pair it to their smartphones.

What’s more the patent describes the device as being able to switch modes of operation “in response to physical contact” likely with a smartphone. Supposedly when your phone makes contact the device it will switch between shooting mode and wireless communication. One theory is the lens camera will utilize NFC to identify when it is connected to make the switch, whereas Olympus cameras have used QR codes to simplify the first time smartphone pairing.

Revealed earlier this year at Photokina, Olympus initially introduced its lens camera concept as an Open Platform camera with the goal to partner up with developers around the world. The company originally stated it wanted to “pioneer a new world of experiences that will change the world of cameras and photography.” Now it seems Olympus is moving forward with turning it into a commercial device.

Via 43 Rumors

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM10 product photos (2 of 7)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

A brand new Olympus OMD camera may well be on its way according to 43 Rumors. One of the site’s highly trusted sources claims Olympus will launch an “exciting new OMD camera in January,” after which the camera will be displayed at CP+ show in Japan in February.

One would theorize Olympus would simply bring a big update to its aging OMD EM5. However, the same source says the new camera won’t just be an evolution but rather something very different. Otherwise there are very few details, but the possibility of a new camera is very likely as it’s been a very long since we’ve seen a truly new  Olympus camera equipped with a new sensor.

There have also been early reports that Olympus is planning to release a digital version of the Trip 35. If the rumors are true, this would be Olympus first premium compact to go up against the Fujifilm X100 family and Panasonic LX100.

Kevin-Lee The Phoblographer Olympus PEN E-PL7 Product Images (1 of 9)

Reports state that Olympus had been working on a PEN camera prototype equipped with a vertical sensor. A source, who claims to have seen the camera, told 43 RumorsThe pen line isn’t discontinued, rather it’s being taken back to its roots.

The vertical sensor harkens back to some of Olympus’ original film cameras like the Olympus PEN D2, which was a half frame SLR camera made with a vertical shutter. What do we mean by half frame? For each photo it shot, only half of a normal 35mm shot was exposed. What that means in practice is that a typical 24 photo roll could yield you 48 photos.

But the shutter different properties too. At the same time because of the vertical shutter, the camera would take portrait images when the users held the camera horizontally. To take images in landscape the photographer would have to hold the camera vertically.

Olympus has been purportedly toying around with this old design because of the way the sideways travelling shutter saved space for a viewfinder on top of the camera. Unlike the Sony A6000 or Panasonic GX7, this camera would potentially have an EVF hump on top of the camera body rather than a display bumped off to the left side–which is more ergonomically in line with rangefinders.

However, the source also said the camera will likely only remain as a prototype because management believes there’s too much risk in releasing such an unorthodox camera.

 

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus 40-150mm f2.8 PRO product photos (5 of 10)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

The Olympus 40-150mm f2.8 PRO lens is the company’s latest offering for professionals and semi-professionals looking to get better results in a wide zoom range. With the equivalent field of view of 80-300mm due to the 2x crop factor, this is a lens that portrait photographers, wedding photographers, event photographers, photojournalists and sports shooters alike will want to reach for.

One of the biggest selling points is its weather sealing and all metal construction. To add an extra cherry to the icing, there is internal zooming and a cleverly designed retractable lens hood. But will weather sealing and a constant f2.8 aperture be enough to draw consumers to the lens at such a high price point of $1,499?

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