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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony A7s product images (5 of 8)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 5.6

With so many options out there and camera manufacturers introducing new models all the time, it can be tough for someone to figure out what mirrorless camera they should get. It all begins not by saying to your sales guy, “What’s the best camera?” The truth is that they’re all damned good. In fact, the technology has come so far that it’s almost impossible for you to take a terrible image by conventional standards.

Instead, what you should be asking is what you need. That can open up a floodgate of even more questions. But just like buying a car, computer or even a fridge, you should take a look at what your options are.

Here’s how to pick the best mirrorless camera for you.

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Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Olympus PEN E-PL7 Product Images-9

Olympus has announced the PEN E-PL7, the company’s latest Micro Four Thirds camera since unveiling the OMD EM10 way back in January. The new compact system camera not only follows the OMD EM10 it also borrows much of its internals including a 16.1MP Live MOS sensor, TruePic VII image processor, and three-axis VCM image stabilization system. It’s not the most original camera from Olympus, but if the E-PL7’s image quality is on par with the OMD EM10, users will be very happy with camera indeed.

The Olympus PEN E-PL7 also features a new 3-inch, 104K dot touchscreen LCD that flips down a full 180-degrees. When fully flipped the screen sits below the camera body much like the Sony A77 Mark II and faces user for (what else, but) selfies. The new PEN also boasts 8fps sequential shooting without autofocus or 3.5fps with Continuous Auto Focus with tracking modes turned on.

On the software side, Olympus has improved its OI.Share smartphone software allowing users to control even more features of the E-PL7 though a Wi-Fi connected device. New features include a new custom self-timer for setting up a timelapse and “selfie interval shooting.” Olympus has also has added Live Bulb mode to OI.Share allowing users to control and monitor and control bulb photography from a mobile device.

The Olympus PEN E-PL7 will be available in late September in black and silver colors for $599.99 body only or $699.99 when kitted with the M.Zuiko 14-42 mm f3.5-5.6 II R lens.

Lastly Olympus is introducing a black version of its M.Zuiko digital 12mm f2.0 lens, which should pair nicely with Olympus’ all black OMD and PEN cameras. As with the silver version the blacked out 12mm f2.0 lens will retail for $799.99. Check past the break for more images and specs. [click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A7r review photos brooklyn bridge reddit walk (4 of 14)ISO 1001-800 sec at f - 3.2

Shoot Raw. Always shoot Raw. Only shoot Raw: this is the mantra that many, many photographers live by. They swear by it. We swear by it here at the Phoblographer. I swear by it as a photojournalist, commercial and portrait photographer for years. Why? So that we can get a better result in post. So that we can differentiate ourselves from the plebeians and peasants that would rather shoot in just JPEG and be happy with their results. Yes, reader: we are the higher class of citizens that stick our noses and in the air and would rather accept death than shoot in JPEG.

Or at least that’s how it’s been for years. As time has gone on and I’ve reviewed camera after camera and the technology has become better and better, I (we, actually) have seen that JPEG quality has improved tremendously. We even dare to say that it is now so much so to the point where that if you know what you’re doing in the first place with your camera that you won’t need to shoot in RAW. Indeed, many of the photos for the Phoblographer’s Instagram are shot in JPEG with an Olympus OMD EM5, Sony A7, or Sony NEX 6 then transferred right over to my phone or iPad and added to our feed. How much post-production goes into them? Basically, it’s not much more than some sharpening and contrast fixes in Instagram, VSCO or EyeEm.

And guess what.

The images are good enough for our over 4,000 followers on Instagram and usually just fine for our over 250,000 Facebook followers.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2 review product images (7 of 7)ISO 2001-500 sec at f - 1.7

Behold: the Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2. Yes, an f1.2 autofocusing lens is here for the Micro Four Thirds system. Customers have ben dreaming about a lens like this for many years and as the system has grown up, so too have its optics offerings.

We’re very much inclined to say that this portrait lens is something that you’ll never want to let go of. In collaboration with Leica, Panasonic has created something that is sharp, delivers great colors with skin tones, and isn’t too heavy.

And if anything is holding you back, it will really only be the price.

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Mother Nature

Creating the Photograph is an original series where we interview photographers about a photo that they shot and how it was achieved. The results are some knowledge passed on to you. Want to be featured? Email chrisgampat[at]thephoblographer[dot]com.

Tracie Maglosky is the first female Olympus Trailblazer; but beyond working with the company she is also a wedding and portrait photographer that hails from Cincinnati, Ohio. And for anyone that believes that only DSLRs can create great images that will please your clients at a wedding, Ms. Maglosky will surely prove you wrong. Tracie does what many true professional photographers do: work with ideas and creativity to give their clients the beautiful images that make their jaws drop. And that’s partially the concept behind the image above that was done for a maternity shoot.

Here’s Tracie’s story.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Essentials the Location Shooter (10 of 10)ISO 2001-80 sec

I have a confession to make: I wanted all the gear years ago. My entry point was the Canon 5D Mk II many, many moons ago. I wanted loads of L glass and I wanted to qualify for Canon Professional Services. Back then, you needed two pro level cameras, at least three of the lenses on their recommended list, and had to prove that you’re a working professional. It was going to be awesome. So I went on a quest. I started with a Canon 50mm f1.8–the nifty 50 that everyone gets first. After this I scored the 24-105mm f4 L. Next was the old 80-200mm f2.8 L. Then moved onto a 50mm f1.4. Then the 7D. Then a 35mm f1.4 L. Then an 85mm f1.8. Then flashes came into play. And triggers. And light modifiers. Before I knew it, my camera bag was getting really full and I needed another one.

But then other companies started to develop some amazing technology and I wanted a smaller camera. The Olympus EP2 became my next purchase after getting and using a bunch of Canon L glass and primes. It was small, could take great photos in the right situations, and felt great in the hands. But then the EP3 came out–and it was perhaps the fastest focusing camera in the world. And a spiral happened.

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