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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus 40-150mm f2.8 PRO product photos (5 of 10)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

The Olympus 40-150mm f2.8 PRO lens is the company’s latest offering for professionals and semi-professionals looking to get better results in a wide zoom range. With the equivalent field of view of 80-300mm due to the 2x crop factor, this is a lens that portrait photographers, wedding photographers, event photographers, photojournalists and sports shooters alike will want to reach for.

One of the biggest selling points is its weather sealing and all metal construction. To add an extra cherry to the icing, there is internal zooming and a cleverly designed retractable lens hood. But will weather sealing and a constant f2.8 aperture be enough to draw consumers to the lens at such a high price point of $1,499?

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Kevin-Lee The Phoblographer Olympus PEN E-PL7 Product Images (1 of 9)

The Olympus PEN E-PL7 is the fifth (sixth including the E-PL6) camera to reuse the OMD EM5’s 16MP sensor since it was first announced in February 2012. Over the years Olympus has tuned the performance of its imaging chip as it’s been incorporated into camera bodies including the PEN E-P5 and OMD EM10. But even with these improvements and tweaks, we still have to wonder how much more can we squeeze out of this nearly three-year-old sensor?

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Felix Esser The Phoblographer Lenses Apertures

Consumers who are always concerned about when their camera will become outdated should not only be aware of the technology that has been progressing in sensor performance, but also whether or not lens R&D will be able to keep up. A question dawned on us one day: with sensor technology moving ahead at such a fast pace, will lens technology be able to do the same? Years ago, it was common for a lens to last a photographer 10 years until the next refresh. But in more recent years, we’ve been seeing shorter lifespans of around five years. Part of this is due to developments in autofocusing and sensor technology.

But at the same time, should photographers be afraid that their collection of glass will become obsolete? We talked to the folks at Olympus, Fujifilm, Panasonic, Sigma and Tokina about this.

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Chris-Gampat-The-Phoblographer-Tamron-90mm-f2_003

When shooting macro images, you don’t need the most top of the line gear or even the best camera. What you need instead is an effective setup to give you better images. If you’re using a macro lens with the ambient light in your home, you should know that you can spend a little bit of money and get so much more from the images without needing to crank up your camera’s ISO. This actually results in a bigger loss of details. The best way to do it is to go for an affordable lens, tripod and a great lighting setup for cheap.

Here are some of our favorite items to use for macro photography projects at home for under $500.

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Karl Taylor

Bigger sensor, better photos. That is how photography is supposed to work, right? Wrong, it’s all about the lighting. Photography instructor Karl Taylor has a new YouTube video showing just how important lighting is in a head to head comparison between a Canon 5D Mk III and Olympus OMD EM10.

One would think that a full frame sensor would completely steamroll the entry level Micro Four Thirds camera with a much smaller sensor. However, a relatively simple two light setup evens out the performance between these two divergent cameras.

In the video Karl uses an Octabox 75 to light his background. Meanwhile, Karl has his assistant hold a large white board to bounce the softened light from an Octabox 150 onto his model, Sophie. At the end of the day both cameras resolve nearly the same image with some slight differences in skin tone. You can check out the video after the break.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus EM1 in silver (12 of 17)

It was only a matter of time before Olympus brought out a silver version of their award winning EM1 camera. But with today’s announcement of this camera comes a fairly significant firmware update that they’re branding as 2.0. One of the biggest things that they’re boasting is enabling tethering with the camera and live tethering with a new piece of software that is also being released today called Olympus Capture. You’ll be able to tether with Lightroom and Capture One as well, but those pieces of software won’t give you the live view abilities on your computer like Olympus Capture will.

Besides the studio folks though, they’re also pushing a new keystone compensation feature that corrects vertical lines–like those when shooting buildings. Otherwise they’re adding two new art filters, a live composite mode that offers a preview of a long exposure, and EVF lag improvement.

Body only on the silver EM1 will be $1,399. But otherwise, current EM1 owners will be able to download the firmware update off of Olympus’s website.

More images of the new(ish) camera are after the jump.

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