web analytics

olympus

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2 review product images (7 of 7)ISO 2001-500 sec at f - 1.7

Behold: the Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2. Yes, an f1.2 autofocusing lens is here for the Micro Four Thirds system. Customers have ben dreaming about a lens like this for many years and as the system has grown up, so too have its optics offerings.

We’re very much inclined to say that this portrait lens is something that you’ll never want to let go of. In collaboration with Leica, Panasonic has created something that is sharp, delivers great colors with skin tones, and isn’t too heavy.

And if anything is holding you back, it will really only be the price.

[click to continue…]

Mother Nature

Creating the Photograph is an original series where we interview photographers about a photo that they shot and how it was achieved. The results are some knowledge passed on to you. Want to be featured? Email chrisgampat[at]thephoblographer[dot]com.

Tracie Maglosky is the first female Olympus Trailblazer; but beyond working with the company she is also a wedding and portrait photographer that hails from Cincinnati, Ohio. And for anyone that believes that only DSLRs can create great images that will please your clients at a wedding, Ms. Maglosky will surely prove you wrong. Tracie does what many true professional photographers do: work with ideas and creativity to give their clients the beautiful images that make their jaws drop. And that’s partially the concept behind the image above that was done for a maternity shoot.

Here’s Tracie’s story.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Essentials the Location Shooter (10 of 10)ISO 2001-80 sec

I have a confession to make: I wanted all the gear years ago. My entry point was the Canon 5D Mk II many, many moons ago. I wanted loads of L glass and I wanted to qualify for Canon Professional Services. Back then, you needed two pro level cameras, at least three of the lenses on their recommended list, and had to prove that you’re a working professional. It was going to be awesome. So I went on a quest. I started with a Canon 50mm f1.8–the nifty 50 that everyone gets first. After this I scored the 24-105mm f4 L. Next was the old 80-200mm f2.8 L. Then moved onto a 50mm f1.4. Then the 7D. Then a 35mm f1.4 L. Then an 85mm f1.8. Then flashes came into play. And triggers. And light modifiers. Before I knew it, my camera bag was getting really full and I needed another one.

But then other companies started to develop some amazing technology and I wanted a smaller camera. The Olympus EP2 became my next purchase after getting and using a bunch of Canon L glass and primes. It was small, could take great photos in the right situations, and felt great in the hands. But then the EP3 came out–and it was perhaps the fastest focusing camera in the world. And a spiral happened.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 20mm f1.7 II review lead image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-30 sec at f - 2.8

Panasonic’s 20mm f1.7 II is a lens that was designed for the street photographer and for the creative embracing smaller cameras. It is an update to one of the first lenses put out for the Micro Four Thirds system; and it has been long overdue in some eyes. Sticking with the pancake design, the lens has upgrades including a metal body, faster focusing motors, and a considerable price hike.

But if you’re a street photographer, then this lens may be the single one you’ll want to own.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM1 Product Photos (2 of 8)ISO 2001-40 sec at f - 2.8

The Olympus OMD EM1 might have released last October but it seems the Micro Four Thirds still has some untapped potential. 43Rumors has received a tip that an upcoming firmware update will allow EM1 users to shoot 4K video plus a whole lot more video shooting options.

It seems almost too good to be true that a simple software patch supposedly coming this September would suddenly unlock 4K video-shooting capability. But we’ve also seen the way other software patches like Magic Lantern completely open up cameras for more dynamic range, RAW video, and other ways manufacturers never intended. So with that said, it could indeed be possible.

With 4K in its arsenal the OMD EM1 would be a real video-shooting powerhouse. Thanks to its built-in 5-axis stabilization and great electronic viewfinder, it would make for the perfect small digital video camera if paired with the right accessories.

On top of a purported firmware patch coming, the EM1 will also supposedly get a new silver model announced at Photokina. It’s pretty common to see camera re-released in new colors so this could very well happen. Unlike the OMD EM5 and EM10, the EM1 has only been available in black, so anyone holding out for a silver version of this retrofied camera might not have to wait much longer.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM10 product photos (3 of 7)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.5

43 Rumors has heard from two trusted Olympus sources that the company planning to announce a new OMD Micro Four Thirds camera at Photokina. Other than noting the possibility of a new entry in the OMD line there’s no word on specs, but with cameras like the OMD EM10 and EM1 already, Olympus has a great platform to build on.

Most likely we imagine—and this is purely speculation—Olympus will update either the OMD EM1 or EM5, for a fully weather-sealed camera body. We can also expect high-resolution sensor bumping up the megapixels past 16 along with an improved autofocus system adding more phase-detect AF points. The likely route is that they’ll update the EM5–though folks who purchased the camera have been waiting patiently for a firmware update to bring focus peaking to the camera.

Since announcing the OMD EM10 in late January, the Japanese camera company has been completely silent on what it’s planning next. This was also partially because the camera company released five new models in relatively quick succession over the past two years. Since then Olympus has practically repackaged the same, but excellent sensor, in-body stabilization and quick AF technologies into different camera bodies.

With the next iteration we expect Olympus will unveil something truly different–perhaps a ground breaking EVF or some other feature. The OMD has proven itself as a capable little street shooter to making professional grade landscapes and portraits, and its even the perfect camera for families. With in that mind we’re absolutely ecstatic about what Olympus could possibly have cooked up.

Whatever they come up with, it will need to win over folks from the Fujifilm, Samsung and Sony circles.