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Joe McNally Lastolite Ezybox

Photographer have long known the best light for portraits is defused, directional light but what about adding some extra illumination in broad daylight? Despite how redundant it might seem to add even more light when the sun is high in the sky, sometimes an extra hint of fill light can make your pictures pop more and clearer.

Luckily professional photographer savant Joe McNally is here to show you how its done right. In an episode of Adorama TV video Joe shows off how the Lastolite Ezybox softbox paired with a Nikon SB-910 speedlight can add soft directional light to make a picture really sing.

Thanks to a new white interior for the Lastolite softbox that Joe thought up, the Ezybox adds a soft shower of illumination that naturally falls off the subject’s body. Normally the same softbox would come with a silver interior, which would produce a much crisper and contrasty image, but at the cost of producing a much brighter center of illumination. We much prefer the natural softer look of this the white Lastolite Ezyboz with the white lining too.

In case you were wondering what other gear Joe had on hand for the shoot he also used a Nikon D800E with a Nikkor 24-70mm f2.8G lens, and an Avenger C stand to hold his speedlight. Check past the jump to see the video.

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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony A7s product images (5 of 8)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 5.6

With so many options out there and camera manufacturers introducing new models all the time, it can be tough for someone to figure out what mirrorless camera they should get. It all begins not by saying to your sales guy, “What’s the best camera?” The truth is that they’re all damned good. In fact, the technology has come so far that it’s almost impossible for you to take a terrible image by conventional standards.

Instead, what you should be asking is what you need. That can open up a floodgate of even more questions. But just like buying a car, computer or even a fridge, you should take a look at what your options are.

Here’s how to pick the best mirrorless camera for you.

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"www.thomascampbellphoto.com"

Recently I spent almost two weeks on a trip to Iceland with a primary purpose of shooting landscapes of the amazing country. It is always hard to guess exactly what I would need, especially considering I am more of a portrait photographer than a landscape photographer and am not especially experienced at landscapes, though like nearly all photographers, I love shooting landscapes.

I want to go through what I decided to pack for my trip to Iceland, why I decided to pack it, and what I would do differently if I knew what I knew now after two weeks in Iceland.

Editor’s Note: This is a guest blog post from former Phoblographer staffer Thomas Campbell

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer beach shot with tokina 70-200mm f4 (1 of 1)ISO 1001-1250 sec at f - 4.0

Tokina has always been a maker of some excellent third party lenses, and the release of the Tokina 70-20mm f4 ATX Pro heralds this even more so. The recently announced lens isn’t billed as being weather sealed–but that doesn’t meant that it wasn’t able to take a beating. The lens also exhibits great image quality and some of the best bokeh that we’ve seen from a zoom lens.

But while it’s an overall great lens, know that it doesn’t specialize in any one particular aspect.

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Nikon 6mm f2.8 Image 1

One of the world’s rarest and most exotic Nikon 6mm f2.8 fisheye lenses is now on sale on eBay for an eye-popping $96,187.50. The lens is the stuff of legend in the 35mm film camera days. Originally released in 1970, the lens boasts a field of view of 220-degrees, allowing it to literally see behind itself.

Supposedly the lens was originally developed for special scientific and industrial use according to the seller’s description. This “special wider-than-180-degreee picture coverage [was] required for surveillance work, photographing the interiors of pipes, boilers, conduits, cylinder bores, and other constricted areas.”

Despite the lens’ relatively short barrel length, it’s made up of 12 elements in 9 groups. On the front end there’s a front dome-shaped end piece of glass that’s actually five built-in filters.

Weighing in at a hefty 5.2 kilograms (11-pounds) and measuring 236mm (9.2-inches) in diameter, this is a lens that will be a pain to move around and it’ll almost always need a tripod. The seller also notes that the Nikon 6mm f2.8 is a more of a status lens than something you’ll ever take out. However, photographers who need to shoot tight interiors or want a completely unique look to their landscape images can’t ask (quite literally) for a wider lens.

While many of you won’t be able to buy this incredibly expensive lens, you can check out more images of it after the break.

Via eBay

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

Though this seems to not have hit America just yet, Nikon Europe recently issued a product advisory notice on the D810 camera. It’s a strange problem that occurs during the shooting of long exposures and when the camera is in the 1.2x crop mode. Apparently what happens is that the camera’s images will show bright spots. Only certain serial numbers are affected and you can see if yours is subject to a free repair from Nikon.

For the most part it seems like a very rare problem and one that only occurs is a very unusual circumstance as we don’t see many folks doing long exposures in that specific crop mode on the camera.

The full product advisory notice is after the jump, but also be sure to check out our full review of the camera.

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