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Phottix Odin TTL II

There are few products in the photo world that we don’t think need an update or an upgrade–and high up on that list was Phottix’s Odin II TTL flash transmitter. We reviewed the first one and awarded it an Editor’s Choice rating. To this day, we still use it and highly recommend it to anyone. But today at Photokina 2014, the company is announcing a brand new refresh to the transmitter. It now involves a new button layout, brighter green lights, and an overall more modern and sexy design.

So what’s new with the Odin II? For starters, you can control the manual power output from 1/1 to 1/256–which is amongst the lowest that we’ve seen. It also allows for modelling light control with the new Indra 500 monolight that the company announced yesterday. Users also can have give different lighting groups–which means that you can get more or less as complicated with your lighting as you want. You also get 32 radio channels that can control pretty much every single Phottix radio enabled flash or trigger product.

No word on pricing yet, but as far as lighting goes, Phottix seems to be stealing the show. They’ve announced the Canon and Nikon versions, and we’re sure that Sony will come later.

Tech specs are after the jump.

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Indra Side 2

With Profoto previously coming out their TTL B1 monolights, it was only a matter of time before another manufacturer released their own. With Phottix coming out with their line of Odin TTL transmitters and receivers, it makes complete sense that at Photokina 2014 the company is announcing a brand new TTL monolight. The new Indra 500 will work with Odin transmitters–the same ones that trigger the company’s Mitros+ flashes.

The Indra 500 TTL has TTL operation for both Canon and Nikon systems when using the Odin receiver. Additionally, the light can do high speed sync and is powered by a Li-Ion battery or AC adapter–which is great for location work.

This light was years in development, And the result is eight stops of power adjustment and when working with TTL transmission you can use +/-3 EV settings.

No word on pricing yet, but be sure that we’re super excited about what’s capable with this light. More tech specs and images are after the jump.

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Daughter Performing Magic

Creating the Photograph is an original series where we interview photographers about a photo that they shot and how it was achieved. The results are some knowledge passed on to you. Want to be featured? Email chrisgampat[at]thephoblographer[dot]com.

Photographer Corey Boland is a physical therapist that wears the photographer cape and cowl at night, but like the great Williams Carlos Williams before him, he surely has a creative and artistic side. We found the image that is the center of this post when he posted it on Reddit–naturally though, we know exactly how it was lit. But even though the methodology is fairly common, many don’t know how a photo like this is achieved. Nor do they always have the creative vision to pull something like this off in a very smart way.

Here’s Corey’s story.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Rokinon Sigma 85mm f1.4 three way comparison (1 of 3)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 3.5

With Zeiss’s new 85mm f1.4 Otus reviewed, we took it upon ourselves to do an informal comparison of two of its biggest and closest competitors: the Rokinon 85mm f1.4 and the Sigma 85mm f1.4. Now granted, neither of these lenses are said to be targeted at the higher end photographer. But with Sigma’s offering being a couple of years old and Rokinon’s not being so old either, we decided that it would be great to see just how the three perform against one another.

Editor’s Note: Again we are saying that this is an informal comparison to see how the three stack up against one another. We’d like to remind our readers though that each offering is pretty darn solid, but if anything this is more of a measure of how the technology has progressed.

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AFS_20_1.8G

In addition to the new D750 that Nikon has announced tonight, they’re also announcing a brand new 20mm f1.8 wide angle lens. This adds onto the company’s 85mm f1.8, 50mm f1.8, 35mm f1.8, and 28mm f1.8. The new wide angle lens is designed for full frame cameras and offers a super wide perspective. It sports a nano-crystal coating on the lenses, whisper quiet autofocus, and will set you back $799.99.

The lens has 13 elements in 11 groups, seven aperture blades, two ED elements, two aspherical elements, and roughly the same construction as Nikon’s other f1.8 lenses.

Nikon didn’t see a reason to stop at a lens though, they’re also announcing the new SB-500 flash. More details on that are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus product images review (2 of 7)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.0

DxOMark recently finished their evaluation of the Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus lens in the labs. And according to them, it’s the best performing 85mm lens that they’ve tested. Indeed, with a $4,490 price tag we would expect the same thing. According to them, the two Otus lenses perform just as well as the company’s 135mm f2 on Canon DSLRs. But when it comes to Nikon DSLRs, the 55mm Otus slightly edged out the 85mm. Additionally, it outperforms any other 85mm lens out there–which only makes sense given the high end audience that this lens was designed for.

The company’s finding reaffirm ours in our real world test of the Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus. We found the 55mm to be slightly sharper and also found the bokeh on the 135mm f2 to be better. Granted that’s a longer focal length.

Head on over to our full review of the Otus for more.