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"www.thomascampbellphoto.com"

Recently I spent almost two weeks on a trip to Iceland with a primary purpose of shooting landscapes of the amazing country. It is always hard to guess exactly what I would need, especially considering I am more of a portrait photographer than a landscape photographer and am not especially experienced at landscapes, though like nearly all photographers, I love shooting landscapes.

I want to go through what I decided to pack for my trip to Iceland, why I decided to pack it, and what I would do differently if I knew what I knew now after two weeks in Iceland.

Editor’s Note: This is a guest blog post from former Phoblographer staffer Thomas Campbell

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer beach shot with tokina 70-200mm f4 (1 of 1)ISO 1001-1250 sec at f - 4.0

Tokina has always been a maker of some excellent third party lenses, and the release of the Tokina 70-20mm f4 ATX Pro heralds this even more so. The recently announced lens isn’t billed as being weather sealed–but that doesn’t meant that it wasn’t able to take a beating. The lens also exhibits great image quality and some of the best bokeh that we’ve seen from a zoom lens.

But while it’s an overall great lens, know that it doesn’t specialize in any one particular aspect.

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Nikon 6mm f2.8 Image 1

One of the world’s rarest and most exotic Nikon 6mm f2.8 fisheye lenses is now on sale on eBay for an eye-popping $96,187.50. The lens is the stuff of legend in the 35mm film camera days. Originally released in 1970, the lens boasts a field of view of 220-degrees, allowing it to literally see behind itself.

Supposedly the lens was originally developed for special scientific and industrial use according to the seller’s description. This “special wider-than-180-degreee picture coverage [was] required for surveillance work, photographing the interiors of pipes, boilers, conduits, cylinder bores, and other constricted areas.”

Despite the lens’ relatively short barrel length, it’s made up of 12 elements in 9 groups. On the front end there’s a front dome-shaped end piece of glass that’s actually five built-in filters.

Weighing in at a hefty 5.2 kilograms (11-pounds) and measuring 236mm (9.2-inches) in diameter, this is a lens that will be a pain to move around and it’ll almost always need a tripod. The seller also notes that the Nikon 6mm f2.8 is a more of a status lens than something you’ll ever take out. However, photographers who need to shoot tight interiors or want a completely unique look to their landscape images can’t ask (quite literally) for a wider lens.

While many of you won’t be able to buy this incredibly expensive lens, you can check out more images of it after the break.

Via eBay

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

Though this seems to not have hit America just yet, Nikon Europe recently issued a product advisory notice on the D810 camera. It’s a strange problem that occurs during the shooting of long exposures and when the camera is in the 1.2x crop mode. Apparently what happens is that the camera’s images will show bright spots. Only certain serial numbers are affected and you can see if yours is subject to a free repair from Nikon.

For the most part it seems like a very rare problem and one that only occurs is a very unusual circumstance as we don’t see many folks doing long exposures in that specific crop mode on the camera.

The full product advisory notice is after the jump, but also be sure to check out our full review of the camera.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon 35mm product images (3 of 6)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 3.5

The cries and pleas of Nikon fanboys everywhere may finally be answered. According to Nikon Rumors, the company will be releasing another full frame DSLR coined the Nikon D750. It will sit below the D810 and above the Nikon D610. And for many that stated that the D800 and D810 weren’t true successors to the D700, the D750 will feature a more modest 24.3MP full frame sensor according to reports.

More analysis is after the jump.

Also check out our Nikon D810 review.

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Review: Nikon D810

by Chris Gampat on 08/17/2014

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

The Nikon D810 is the latest flagship DSLR from Nikon without a vertical grip attached. Coming in two years after the D800 and D800E; it is seen as the replacement for both cameras. For the most part, Nikon has given users some very minor upgrades in the same way that Canon didn’t offer too much change from the 5D Mk II to the Mk III. Most notably with the D810 is the modest bump in megapixels with no AA filter, the D4s’ autofocusing system, better high ISO output, and something that Nikon users have been asking for for a very long time: small RAW mode. Indeed, with this camera it is now possible to not fill up your computer’s hard drive after a single professional shooting session.

The Nikon D810 is a heck of a lot of camera that we don’t think that everyone needs at all. And those that would make the best use of it are those that make a living from selling their images. But for many of those people, the upgrade may not be enough.

For others: the Nikon D810 may be the camera that makes you drop your current system and switch over immediately.

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