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mirrorless camera

Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony A7s product images (5 of 8)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 5.6

With so many options out there and camera manufacturers introducing new models all the time, it can be tough for someone to figure out what mirrorless camera they should get. It all begins not by saying to your sales guy, “What’s the best camera?” The truth is that they’re all damned good. In fact, the technology has come so far that it’s almost impossible for you to take a terrible image by conventional standards.

Instead, what you should be asking is what you need. That can open up a floodgate of even more questions. But just like buying a car, computer or even a fridge, you should take a look at what your options are.

Here’s how to pick the best mirrorless camera for you.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

At least every other day, we receive an email or message of some sort asking about what camera someone should purchase. In fact, I’ve been dealing with emails like this for years via the Phoblographer and during my time at B&H Photo. Usually, it’s from someone who knows nothing about photography. A former colleague of mine recently messaged me and said something along the lines of “Hey, the wife and I are thinking about buying a DSLR. I heard the D800 is good. What should I get?”

Granted, he and his wife know nothing about photography and when I tried to tell him that they don’t need a DSLR or anything as high level as a D800, he thought that I was completely insane. Then I offered alternatives from Fujifilm and Sony in the high end point and shoot world. He retorted with “Okay, just tell me this then: Canon or Nikon?”

Again, I told him that a DSLR is over his head, unless he really wants to learn how to use one to its potential. In truth, it’s also serious overkill.

“Why do you want a DSLR?” I said.

“Better pictures.” He said.

“Yes, but you’ll only get better pictures if you really want to dedicate yourself to learning how to use one. And with a kid on the way you won’t have the time.” I returned.

The point though is that not everyone needs a DSLR or a mirrorless camera. To be incredibly honest, most of the work that I do for the site or the paid photography gigs that I do doesn’t require super high end cameras. But to be fair, I have great lighting knowledge.

Still though, I seriously think that everyone needs to stop just reaching for DSLRs and mirrorless cameras and instead take a strong look at what the high end point and shoot market is offering. There are loads and loads of great options.

And of course, no one is making a bad camera.

 

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer MyMiggo camera strap large review images (6 of 9)ISO 4001-500 sec at f - 4.5

Feast your eyes on some of the ugliest gear that we’ve ever reviewed. They’re called the Miggo strap and wrap–and they come in a variety of sizes and colors. The company coins their products as being able to totally protect your camera one second then allowing you to shoot with ease the next. The straps are made from Neoprene–which helps to absorb some bumps and scratches, but this material seemingly from the Superman universe sure has its kryptonite.

And while it may be a nice idea in theory for sure, we’re not sure that we’d want to tote one around.

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IbarionexThePhoblographerDailyWalk01

Photographers often complain about not having enough time to dedicate to their photography. I am no different. Though I am self-employed, I often face the challenge of finding time to practice photography.

Thankfully, my dogs provide me an excuse to walk for 30 to 60 minutes each day and to make some photographs. Though, I may not make hundreds of images, I still get to practice my ability to see. With that in mind, I offer some suggestions that might help you to take greater advantage of your morning constitutional.

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Sony A7s sensor

Yes! It’s one of those days again where our friends from DxOMark release another sensor test, and this time it’s the one of the new Sony A7S. Just yesterday, we reported on Michael Reichmann’s first impressions review of the A7S, and he was so bold as to claim that the camera exhibits medium format-like image quality. Well, according to DxOMark, things aren’t quite as shiny. Head past the break for more.

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Sony A7s sensor

We knew that Sony’s new A7S would be a low-light monster. We knew it would provide outstanding image quality due to its super large pixels. We knew that it would put pretty much any other full-frame camera to shame. What we didn’t know is that it would even rival medium format systems in terms of pure image quality. Or at least, that is what Michael Reichmann with The Luminous Landscape claims.

Reichmann has just posted his first-impressions review of Sony’s new 4K-capable full-frame mirrorless camera, and he seems to be quite smitten with the product. Thanks to its large pixels, which are twice the size as those of the A7, and three times the size as those of the A7R, the camera produces not only super clean high ISO images, but also renders a certain look that Reichmann likens to that of medium format cameras.

Compared to the 36MP A7R, Reichmann finds that the A7S produces superior images at ISO settings beyond 1,600. And while the A7R’s output becomes pretty much unusable (in his opinion) at ISO 12,800, the A7S holds up well until ISO 51,200 “with some moderate noise reduction.” As for dynamic range, Reichmann claims he does not see a difference between the A7S and A7R, but admits that this may need further testing.

Another aspects that he likes about the camera, apart from the possibility to record 4K video, is its electronic front curtain shutter, which helps make the camera virtually silent during exposure. This is something that wedding photographers, among others, might find to be a great benefit, as it helps take pictures more stealthily.

After reading Reichmann’s first impressions over at The Luminous Landscape, we can hardly wait until our own review unit comes in and we can put it through its paces.

Via Sony Alpha Rumors