The New Panasonic 100-400mm f4-6.4 ASPH Cost $1,799.99

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At CES 2016, Panasonic is announcing their new telephoto zoom lens for the Micro Four Thirds system of cameras. It’s been talked about for a while now; but the Panasonic 100-400mm f4-6.3 ASPH will be coming to stores in early April for $1,799.99. The lens offers quite a bit of zoom range basically giving us a 200-800mm f8-12.6 equivalent if you compare it to 35mm full frame competitors (with the F stop representing the depth of field.)

More photos and the press release are after the jump.

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The Mitakon 25mm f0.95 for Micro Four Thirds is Nearly Pancake

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We’ve heard rumors about it before, but now it seems that the lens is really a reality. The Mitakon 25mm f0.95 is a small lens designed for Micro Four Thirds cameras and that is significantly smaller than anything like the Voigtlander 25mm f0.95. On Olympus and Panasonic cameras, it will render a 50mm field of view with an f1.9 depth of field full frame equivalent.

So how small is this lens? It is 1.8 inches long and weights 0.51 lbs. That’s super lightweight!

The lens features a smooth and clickless aperture–which will be nice for video but can make situations like street photography a bit tougher due to need to actually look down at the lens vs muscle memory via the clicks.

Best of all, it’s going to be cheap! When it ships to US retailers in mid-October, it will cost only $399.

Lens specs and sample images are after the jump.

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Prototype for Mitakon 25mm f0.95 MFT Pancake Lens Appears

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We knew that it was possible for a 25mm f0.95 lens to be created for the Micro Four Thirds system, but we had no idea that it was possible for it to be done in a pancake lens. Yes, you heard that right. According to 43Rumors, a prototype is floating around. There isn’t much information out there, but Mitakon says that it’s going to cost as much as the Voigtlander version–so over $1,000 for a manual focus, pancake lens that can shoot as wide open at f0.95. Considering the 2x crop factor, that means that wide open it will have the equivalent depth of field and field of view of a 50mm f1.9 lens on a full frame camera.

Crazy, huh?

The sample images published so far as also quite nice.

If this indeed is something that comes to the market, it’s going to be a big deal. A Mitakon 25mm f0.95 pancake lens for the micro four thirds system that is also capable of shooting at f0.95? That’s incredible. Yes, lots of people love to autofocus, but you don’t really need to if you just get used to working with manual focusing. In fact, it’s pretty fun and for street photography (the market that would totally pick this lens up) it’s pretty much perfect.

At the same time though, Fujifilm has been eating into the street photography market, so if something like this could be made for an APS-C sensor, that would be even more incredible. Unfortunately, we doubt that that’s going to happen.

The Ten Best Mirrorless Camera Lenses for Street Photography

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 35mm f1.4 Full Frame E Mount lens first impressions product images (6 of 6)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.5

The best focal lengths for street photography tend to range from the low 20s to around 50, and given the ever-increasing popularity of mirrorless cameras, we thought we’d put together a roundup of our ten favorite lenses across systems. Some of these dip below the 20mm mark, but with the crop factor, they’re well within the ideal range. So, if you’re thinking of going mirrorless or have already and want to get into street photography, these are the lenses to consider.

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The Olympus Air A01 Makes Your Phone Suck Less as a Camera

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Though Olympus Air has already been announced in Japan, the little camera that might is finally coming to the US. Very similar to Sony’s QX series of cameras, the Olympus Air product line is an open source camera that takes Micro Four Thirds lenses and is essentially just the sensor, lens mount, WiFi electronics, and a button crammed into ergonomics that will remind you of a can of Burt’s Bees skin moisturizer. The open source designation means that app developers can actually develop apps for the system to make it better.

The Olympus Air A01 is the company’s first offering and has the same 16MP four thirds sensor that many of the company’s other cameras have. However, it doesn’t have Image stabilization in order to keep the unit small. If you mount Panasonic’s lenses that have IS built in though, you’ll get the image stabilization that your shaky hands crave so badly. When it links up with your phone, tablet or phablet you’ll be able to see what the camera sees on a giant screen.

The camera also has focus peaking, which means that all your manual glass will work fine. Additionally, with the electronic shutter the camera can shoot at 1/16,000 of a second and therefore give the user almost no trouble shooting with a lens wide open in sunlight at a lower ISO setting. The Air A01 can shoot 10 fps, has RAW capture, and uses a Micro SD card.

Pretty much everything that you’d expect with an Olympus Micro Four Thirds camera is transferred to the phone when they let their powers combine.

The Olympus Air A01 will be available in the United States in July 2015 in Black or White for $299.99 (body only) or $499.99 paired with a 14-42mm EZ lens, and in Canada in August 2015 in Black or White for $399.99 (body only) or $599.99 paired with a 14-42mm EZ lens. More photos are after the jump.

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The 5 Best Cheap Lenses for Micro Four Thirds Cameras

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 20mm f1.7 II product images first impressions (4 of 5)ISO 4001-500 sec at f - 3.5

Of any mirrorless camera system, the Micro Four Thirds coalition has the most lenses available. Between both Panasonic and Olympus, the system has lots of lenses–but when you consider how open they are to working with third parties then you’ve got even more lenses that are supported. Indeed, new lenses for Micro Four Thirds cameras seem to come out almost every month.

In our years of reviewing lenses, we’ve tested and played with lots of different optics at all different prices. We’ve rounded up our top choices for the best and cheapest lenses for the Micro Four Thirds system. So if you’re looking for the best cheap lenses for Micro Four Thirds cameras, then look no further than right after the jump.

Editor’s Note: In a previous version of this article, we mistook one lens for another. We apologize for our humanity.

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Five Prime Lenses for the Discerning Concert Photographer

Lake Street Dive.

Lake Street Dive by Julius Motal.

Many concert photographers will tell you to use primes if you can. The concept just makes so much sense–they have a fast aperture that will help you out in very low lit situations, they take up less room in a crowded music pit, and you can eventually learn to think and see the world in that single focal length. To that end, it makes the picture taking process much more instinctual.

We’ve tested lots of lenses over time, and have found a handful from pretty much every camera system that work out solidly. But we’d be fools to say that it’s all about the gear here. In the end, it’s your ability to get the shot and predict movement that will award you better photos.

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