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micro four thirds

Panasonic GM5 DxOMark Comparison 1

When we first got our hands on the Panasonic GM5 it felt like a slightly updated GM1 with a new viewfinder and hotshoe. Now that DxOMark has just released its camera testing results of the GM5 we can see the tiny improvement to the underlying sensor. this incremental update has added.

According to DxOMark’s imaging benchmarks, the GM5 trades a sliver of color depth for several ticks of better lowlight ISO performance. Otherwise, there’s very little difference between the sensors. More importantly it appears Olympus is still well ahead of Panasonic when it comes to sensor technology as the OMD EM10 announced at the beginning the year performs better than the GM5 in every aspect.

One surprise we didn’t expect was that the Panasonic GM5’s performance actually isn’t that far off from the top-tier Micro Four Thirds cameras including the Panasonic GH4 and Olympus OMD EM1.

Of course, we have to stress these are just numbers. At the end of the day the GM1 was an excellent camera and we expect the GM5 will perform even better. Check out more results after the break.


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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM10 product photos (2 of 7)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

A brand new Olympus OMD camera may well be on its way according to 43 Rumors. One of the site’s highly trusted sources claims Olympus will launch an “exciting new OMD camera in January,” after which the camera will be displayed at CP+ show in Japan in February.

One would theorize Olympus would simply bring a big update to its aging OMD EM5. However, the same source says the new camera won’t just be an evolution but rather something very different. Otherwise there are very few details, but the possibility of a new camera is very likely as it’s been a very long since we’ve seen a truly new  Olympus camera equipped with a new sensor.

There have also been early reports that Olympus is planning to release a digital version of the Trip 35. If the rumors are true, this would be Olympus first premium compact to go up against the Fujifilm X100 family and Panasonic LX100.

Kevin-Lee The Phoblographer Olympus PEN E-PL7 Product Images (1 of 9)

Reports state that Olympus had been working on a PEN camera prototype equipped with a vertical sensor. A source, who claims to have seen the camera, told 43 RumorsThe pen line isn’t discontinued, rather it’s being taken back to its roots.

The vertical sensor harkens back to some of Olympus’ original film cameras like the Olympus PEN D2, which was a half frame SLR camera made with a vertical shutter. What do we mean by half frame? For each photo it shot, only half of a normal 35mm shot was exposed. What that means in practice is that a typical 24 photo roll could yield you 48 photos.

But the shutter different properties too. At the same time because of the vertical shutter, the camera would take portrait images when the users held the camera horizontally. To take images in landscape the photographer would have to hold the camera vertically.

Olympus has been purportedly toying around with this old design because of the way the sideways travelling shutter saved space for a viewfinder on top of the camera. Unlike the Sony A6000 or Panasonic GX7, this camera would potentially have an EVF hump on top of the camera body rather than a display bumped off to the left side–which is more ergonomically in line with rangefinders.

However, the source also said the camera will likely only remain as a prototype because management believes there’s too much risk in releasing such an unorthodox camera.

 

Kevin-Lee The Phoblographer Olympus PEN E-PL7 Product Images (1 of 9)

The Olympus PEN E-PL7 is the fifth (sixth including the E-PL6) camera to reuse the OMD EM5’s 16MP sensor since it was first announced in February 2012. Over the years Olympus has tuned the performance of its imaging chip as it’s been incorporated into camera bodies including the PEN E-P5 and OMD EM10. But even with these improvements and tweaks, we still have to wonder how much more can we squeeze out of this nearly three-year-old sensor?

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voitglander-10-5-mm-095-3_1410887097

Image courtesy of ePhotoZine

Voigtländer has announced a new Nokton 10.5mm f0.95 lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras. In terms of full frame equivalency the lens offers a nice and wide 21mm equivalent focal length. What’s more–users will be able to get up close with their subject at 17-centimeters (about 6-inches) taking full advantage of all the bokeh that f0.95 lens creates; though we’re still sure that it won’t be very much.

ePhotoZine got a chance to play with the lens and it was thoroughly impressed with the lens’ sharpness and straight lines despite being a wide-angle prime. With the lens being made up of 13 elements in 10 groups, there are undoubtedly more than a few aspherical lenses to help reduce distortion.

The lens is reportedly due to be released sometime in 2015, however, Voigtländer has yet to announce a price. We can’t wait to get this lens in for a full review and until then check past the break for more specs on the Voigtländer Nokton 10.5mm f0.95.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony NEX 3N product photo (1 of 1)ISO 1601-200 sec at f - 2.0

Years ago when the idea of mirrorless cameras and systems was pitched, the premise behind it all was that overall it would create a lighter and smaller kit. And for the most part, manufacturers have stuck to that statement. But at certain times, they really don’t seem to be sticking to it. This concern comes up now more than ever considering that Sony has a full frame mirrorless camera system.

Photographer Tom Northencold wrote a piece recently about why he’s sticking to Micro Four Thirds. The answer: the weight differences vs his Nikon system.

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