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Whether you think it’s hipster or not–let’s be frank, instant film cameras are cool. Who cares if they’re hipster? There are ways that you can make them seem much less so. But even if you have that stigma, the cameras are still capable of producing beautiful work that editors, models, and people in general love. Heck, an entire app was created to emulate the looks of these cameras!

Picking the right one though isn’t so simple. There are many options available both old and new–and you really just need to get the right one for you. That’s much easier said than done though.

Here’s our Guide to Instant Film Cameras and picking the right one for you.


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THIS IS A DEVELOPING STORY. STAY TUNED FOR MORE!

Update: Phase One has issued a letter about the camera system. Check below

Though they’re not exactly what you would think of as a mirrorless medium format camera (unlike the Mamiya 7 II), Phase One is releasing the Phase One A series of cameras–and it’s a pretty close solution to what you’d typically think aboutt. They seem close to what Hasselblad did years ago with some of their cameras by eliminating the mirror and pentaprism–except that this is a digital version. Because it is digital, it’s using a live viewing screen and another screen on top that lets you shoot from the hip the same way that many medium format users used to do.

We will keep you updated on more. But so far, we’re getting this info from Digital Transitions.

More info is after the jump.


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Editor’s Note: this review was syndicated from photographer duo Dylan and Sara with permission. All images and text are theirs.

The last week was spent shooting a few thousand frames through the Pentax 645z. This is Pentax’s new somewhat-affordable medium format system. We wanted to take a real world approach to how we would shoot the camera, so this review will be less technical and more about how it performed on the job.  We took it to a full wedding, a weeks worth of portrait sessions and a night shoot.

Medium format digital cameras have been on our mind lately and this did not let us down. This is one of the many current medium format offerings to use the 51mp CMOS sensor produced by Sony. This new CMOS sensor is a huge deal for the way we shoot, mainly because it allows useable high-iso and live view, this wasn’t possible with the previous generation of medium format digitals.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm X30 first image samples (1 of 28)ISO 4001-80 sec at f - 2.8

The title of this piece can almost make you say, “Duh” depending on what school of thought you’re coming from. Whether we choose to believe it or not, the iPhone is one of the most popular street photography cameras not only due to its small size and reliability, but for the fact that it has such a small sensor that it’s tough to not get a subject in focus. The sensor is indeed so small that it is tough to get something not in focus–so the photographer is forced to have compelling subject matter without relying on tricks like bokeh.

And by going on a similar train of thought, one can argue that smaller sensors indeed make street photography easier.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer The Brenzier Effect tutorial portraits (1 of 3)ISO 16001-80 sec at f - 1.4

Otherwise known as the Brenizer Effect but colloquially called panoramic portraits–this is the act of taking multiple images of a static subject and stitching them together in Photoshop. The result is something that looks like it was shot on a medium format lens and sensor/film plane due to the wide field of view but very shallow depth of field.

Doing them is fairly simple–though there are considerations that you’re going to need to remember along with having a lot of patience while your software of choice processes through an image like this.

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All images courtesy of CineStill

What the world needs right about now is more medium format film: and that’s exactly what the Brothers Wright are looking to create. CineStill announced a new Kickstarter initiative for a medium format 800 ISO 120 film. Like their first entry into the market, this one will be Tungsten color balanced. They’re calling it 800T, and again it is rebadged Kodak cinema film. This time, they’re using Kodak Vision 500T film– which is probably the 65mm film version but rescaled for medium format still camera bodies.

CineStill states that each roll of the film has 250 exposures and medium format 120 film has on average around 12 exposures if you shoot in the 645 format. So each roll could be split into around 20 CineStill films.

The film is said to work with regular C-41 processing–which means that it can be developed at many local stores. One of the biggest things about this film though is the fact that there aren’t very many high ISO medium format films left and available in color–so this would open up new possibilities for medium format shooters everywhere (myself included.)

More images and the company’s new promo video are after the jump.

Via Petapixel

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