5 Fast Aperture Medium Format Lenses You’ll Envy

Image by YJ-Lee

Lots of photographers love talking about medium format cameras, but there isn't as much talk about the lenses. As every photographer knows, a lens is the heart of a camera system and this is as important with medium format cameras as it is with 35mm, APS-C or even Micro Four Thirds cameras. Due to the significantly shallower depth of field at any given aperture, the capabilities of each lens is important when it comes to creating images you simply can't get with the 35mm small format (or full frame, for many of you).

If you're looking for some super fast medium format lenses, here's a list you absolutely need to check out.

Continue reading…

Review: Peak Design Leash and Cuff 2.0 Camera Straps

It's been a while since the Peak Design Leash and Cuff were released, and besides putting out a number of camera bags, the company has been focusing on trying to revamp these two straps. Peak Design, who first got famous off of the idea that you don't really need a camera strap if you use their Capture Clip, created the Peak Design Leash and Peak Design Cuff in response to their customers asking for straps. So with that in mind, it's no surprise the camera straps are still designed to work with their lineup of other products including their camera bags. Today, Peak Design is announcing their new camera straps on Kickstarter, and I've had a number of weeks to play with the new straps.

Continue reading…

Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 in 120 Medium Format Film is Available for Pre-Order

Bellamy Hunt told us that Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 120 would be coming soon, and today he’s announcing that it’s available for pre-order. The film, which is popular with the 35mm film photography world, has finally sold enough that Bellamy decided that it would make sense to have it in a larger film emulsion. Street Pan 400 is unlike many of the others out there with the exception of a few Ilford emulsions. Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 is a near infrared film that needs a lot of light unlike Kodak Tri-X, Fujifilm Acros and a number of others. So if you’re using it then you’ll need to give it more light or expose it at box speed vs pushing it.

Continue reading…

Vintage Film Camera Review: Pentacon Six TL (6×6 Square Format)

There are only a few cameras that have been coined “an SLR on steroids” in the medium format camera world, and one of those is the Pentacon Six TL. The Pentacon Six TL is a medium format SLR camera similar in style to its more famous rival the Pentax 67. It doesn’t use interchangeable backs but instead opts for one of the quirkiest ways of loading a camera perhaps ever. Shooting square format 6×6 images, it’s also prone to problems like frame overlap unless you’re careful. Though if you can work with its quirks, you’ll have yourself a solid SLR camera that is reliable otherwise.

Continue reading…

The Noob’s Guide to Choosing a Medium Format Film Camera

This guide is a guest blog post from photographer Marcin Wajda on choosing a medium format film camera based on just a few of the best offerings out there. Enjoy!

Disclaimer: You don’t have to agree with anything I put down here.

Disclaimer 2: I’m talking about interchangeable lens SLRs here. You can apply some of those principles to selecting a TLR or a rangefinder, but you’d probably be better off asking someone who uses those types of cameras.

I decided to write this, because the topic seems to be pretty popular these days. People ask “What camera?” and sadly, the answers are boiling down to “Get this one, because I use it and what’s good for me is definitely going to be good for you”, which, I think we can agree, is bullshit.

Let’s begin then.

Continue reading…

Brock Saddler Shows You How to Hack the Bronica ETRS to Shoot Fujifilm Instax Mini Film

“Not for the Bronica unfortunately, unless you could possibly bring the tripod mount into it, rigging something to the back to hold it in place,” says photographer Brock Saddler (follow him on Instagram) about his Bronica ETRS hack when I asked him about whether or not he’d still need to use the rubber bands. “…something for the next person to think about.” Brock is amongst the many photographers and hackers we’ve interviewed here on the Phoblographer. His hack specifically has to do with the Bronica ETRS. Last year, we interviewed him about hacking his Bronica ETRS to shoot Fujifilm Instax mini film and he was still in the process of refining it. But he got really close to making it absolutely perfect.

Brock, unfortunately, has no plans to make it commercially viable. “This was just something to do on a rainy day,” he tells us. And to that end, he’s given us permission to share his post on how he did it.

Continue reading…

Review: Kodak TMax 400 (35mm and 120)

Kodak T-Max 400 doesn’t get all the love, love letters, and overall adoration that Kodak Tri-X 400 does simply because of the fact that a ton of the most iconic photos in the world were shot on Tri-X 400 vs T-Max 400. However, part of that has to do with the fact that Tri-X has been around for a longer period of time and T-Max 400 is designed to do something much different. While Tri-X 400 is known for its characteristic midtones and grain, T-Max 400 is instead known for its fairly high contrast (in the highlights and shadows), its incredibly fine grain and its overall sharpness. It’s touted to be the sharpest black and white 400 speed film in the world. Indeed, there has been a movement in the black and white photography world towards the high contrast, crispy, sharp look. And that’s essentially what Kodak T-Max 400 can do while still retaining a fair amount of details in the midtones. It does it in a much different way from a film like Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400–which is a near infrared film. Yet it also differs from many of the Ilford emulsions.Before you go on, more of the specific technical details of using Kodak T-Max 400 can be found in this Kodak PDF file.

Continue reading…

Steve Gosling: Hypnotic Pinholes and Black and White Photography

All images by Steve Gosling. Used with permission.

Photographer Steve Gosling is a true black and white artistic photographer. To him, the gear is only secondary to his creative vision. This is evident in his choice of mediums. He’s used pinhole cameras, large format, and even works with Phase One cameras and lenses. His affinity for the artistic side of photography started when he was really young. He had no interest in math, science, etc. Instead, he was captivated by photography. Luckily, that passion never died out for him.

But if you’re a lover of landscapes, you’re surely going to enjoy his photos and his thought process.

Continue reading…