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Long Exposure

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All images by Julien Breton and David Gallard. Used with permission.

Julien Breton doesn’t earn his living by selling artwork or even photography. But he worked with photographer David Gallard on a special light painting calligraphy project. Julien is a dancer that works with a travelling troupe and along with David creates original photography artwork as part of his passion. None of it is Photoshopped and all of it is incredible. We talked to Julien about how to create light paintings like this and his experience of learning more about the craft.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A6000 product images (3 of 9)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 11

Something that we didn’t ever think would be possible is apparently being made by Sony right now. The most innovative company in the photo world has put in a patent to be able to set the individual exposure parameters at the pixel level instead of the sensor level–or at least that’s what Sony Alpha Rumors is stating.

The new Sony patent clearly discloses this. Apparently, it seems to work by assigning the pixels specific roles to be able to accomplish something like this. In theory, this would mean that it would work best with a higher resolution sensor but that it also means that cleaner image quality could potentially comes from the images. It would also require a ton of processing power and Sony batteries are already being quickly drained of power from the EVF and LCD.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer's Introduction to Pinhole Photography (1 of 1)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.8

Pinhole cameras are interesting in that they force the photographer to look at a scene and envision is in a long exposure with a certain softness. But those amongst the pinhole community know that all you generally need is a container to hold the film with no light leaks, a small hole in said container with a cover to act as a shutter, and that’s about it. The cool thing is that you can make pinhole cameras from almost anything: like a beer can for example.

In fact, many photographers try to custom make their own pinhole cameras for creativity purposes.

The video below is a simple step by step tutorial on how to create a pinhole camera of your own and tells you how they work. Indeed, they can create very beautiful and haunting images in the hands of the right person and many folks opt for using black and white film over anything else.

Check out the video after the jump.

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All images by Gabriel Torney. Used with permission.

Lasers, strobe lighting, and a beautiful starry background–what could be better? Gabe Torney shared this image on Reddit and it quickly hit the site’s front page.

“I have been really impressed with astrophotography and recently had a family vacation in Lake Tahoe where the stars are abundant. A family friend who was staying with us had brought his awesome laser and I figured it could play a big part in some photos.” says Gabe about how the image came together. “One of the nights, we drove away from the lake until we found a clearing deep in the wilderness. We hopped out of the car and looked up to see the sky glittering above.”

Gabe’s brother was the subject in the photo and used a Wicked Laser Arctic 3–which otherwise can be dangerous. Luckily, no aircraft were around and it was a clear sky.

Gabe used a Canon 5D Mk II with a 28mm f1.8 on a tripod with a shutter remote. To ensure that his brother (the subject) wasn’t completely whited out, his niece held a flashlight just off center. Gabe continues to tell us that after he posted it online that the community gave him other tips on how to better capture his subject in a crisper way.

It’s a fun idea and plays with lighting, long exposure technique, composition and backgrounds quite well.



Chris Gampat The Phoblographer's Introduction to Pinhole Photography (1 of 1)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.8

Pinhole photography has to be one of the most beautiful forms of the art. It forces a photographer to rely on great composition, exposure timing, and creative ideas to yield a beautiful image. But fair warning: you won’t be doing any pixel peeping or anything else technical aside from figuring out your exposure in the first place.

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fireworks for the 4th

When it comes to capturing fireworks, you’ll want to do a couple of things first. If you’re looking to do that this 4th of July consider some very basics. First off, you’ll want to get to and claim a good spot for you to see them. Some of the best are along a waterfront or on someone’s rooftop. When you claim your spot, you’ll want to settle in and not move until after the fire show is done.

When that’s been conquered, you’ll want to follow these short tips.

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