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lomography

LCA 120 Lomography

We didn’t think that it could be done, but Lomography has surely done it. Today, the company has come out with something seriously and amazingly cool for medium format photographers. Building on the success of their LCA+ and LC-Wide cameras, the company has created the LCA 120–the same camera as their 35mm versions but able to take 120 film.

In a way, we could easily call this a medium format point and shoot with program exposure shooting. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have aperture control like the original LCA did, but much can still be done with this camera.

It sports a 38mm f4.5 lens–which roughly translates into around a 24mm equivalent somewhere between f2.8 and f3.5 in the 35mm film equivalent world. They’re also claiming a very compact body, square image types, multiple exposure capabilities, and rear curtain flash sync for really creative images.

Plus, the lens is made of glass–just like the other LCA cameras. It’s going for $429; which isn’t terrible at all for medium format. More images and specs are after the jump.

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ColourMix

Attention film photographers, Lomographers, and people who just happen to like quirky stuff in general, Vienna-based company Revolog has finally landed in America.

If you don’t know who or what Revolog is, that’s probably because up until now, their products were only easily accessible in their Europe-based online shop (shipping to US/Canada would take up to 23 days), some parts of Asia, or on eBay. And what, pray tell, are their products? Well, Revolog makes special effects 35mm films that somehow purposely mimic things like film imperfections, results of camera defects, and even effects of flatbed scanner glass dust to yield different results from mulit-colored lines and light flashes to rainbow color shifts and splatter-like dots, all neatly packed in brightly-colored bubble gum labels with names like Volvox, Tesla, Lazer, Rasp, and Streak.

So the European duo behind those weird but apparently crowd-pleasing special effects films, Michael Krebs and Hanna Pribitzer, has partnered up with who-else-but trendy analogue photography company and well-known avid experimental photography supporter Lomography to make their special 35mms now easily accessible in the US and to the rest of the world. That way,  no lo-fi photography fan will ever have to wait a month to take his or her perfectly imperfect shots again.

The Revolog 35mm special films are now available in the Lomography online store. Prices range from $9.90 to $11.90 a roll. Depending on the type, a roll may come with 36 or 12 exposures.

Lomography Agfa CT Precisa 100 Film product image 1

Back by popular demand, Lomography has a new stock of Agfa CT Percisa 100 film. The 35mm color slide film is designed to help shooters capture rich, deep blue skies without overlaying the entire image with a cool blue filter allowing the film to produce render warm colors as well. At the same time the film can resolve nice and sharp details. Another advantage of the Agfa CT Percisa film is it creates extremely fine outlines at every gradations of light and shade making cloudy skies pop with a unique look.

For a small history lesson Agfa films originally come from a small Germany company started in 1867 that has as strong ties to medical imaging systems as it does photography. Eventually the company folded and when into bankruptcy in 2004. A surviving branch continues to produces film for aerial photography.

Agfa also sold may of its remaining coated film rolls to Ferrania, a third party supplier of consumer film to many others selling under their own name. Meanwhile, Agfaphoto film is also produced by Fuji in Japan, Kodak in Mexico, and Lucky in China; so the film could have come from any of these companies.

As with most things in the film world the Agfa brand become diluted and attached to completely different types of film. Lomography stock itself has even been rumored to carry the same film chemistry as Afga, which would explain the rich color tones of many of the company’s film stocks.

You can pick up a roll of Agfa CT Precisa for $8.90 a piece. Check past the break for more images taken with the film.

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Lomography Cine200

Lomography has a new film emulsion–sort of.

In some very recent news, the company announced their new Cine200 Tungsten film. From the name and the coloring, it sounds very similar to what was done previous by Cinestill. Basically, it involves unwinding rolls of Kodak cinema film and repackaging it into a 35mm still film casing. We wouldn’t really call this ripping it off; instead we’re more about embracing the experimental happening that may occur in the right creative’s hands.

In fact, Lomo is completely clear about this. According to them,

This emulsion is an authentic cine film, which has been specially treated so that it can be used in your 35mm film camera. What this means: it will yield phenomenal photos that look like stills from a movie! It’s convenient too, because this Color Negative Film can be processed normally in C-41.”

And as a result, it’s a limited batch of only 4,000 rolls.

Working with this film will indeed be tough for many though. Since it’s Tungsten, then you’ll need to work with a very warm light source to equalize it on the color scale.

We’re in the process of calling in a couple of rolls for review; so just stay tuned.

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Image by Dan Zvereff. Used in our previous interview with him.

For all the lovers of the analog world out there, you should know that a recent Change.org petition to revive one of the greatest films that the world has seen: Kodak Aerochrome. Shooting Film first caught wind of the story and states that UK based Jasmin G is calling on Kodak Alaris and the Lomography company to revive the film. Lomography tried to do a variant called Lomochrome Purple, but it totally isn’t the same thing. While Lomochrome puts an emphasis on purple colors, Aerochrome put it on a pinkish purplish red.

How do they do this? For starters, Aerochrome was an infrared film originally developed for surveillance reasons. Years ago, the US would fly planes over the Congo and other regions with dense vegetation to find guerilla troops. When developed, the film would render the greens into a color like what you see in the image above that leads this story. However, later on the commercial world started to use it for art projects. Dan Zvereff and Richard Mosse are two famous photographers that come to mind at first. We have a full introduction to the film at this link–which also explains how it works.

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Lomography has set a new $1,000,000 goal for its Lomo’Instant camera, and with three days left to go, there’s only $24,000 more until that goal is met. Lomo set the new goal in order to give all Lomo’Instant backers a closeup lens for this instant wunderkind with its surprising amount of customizable features: various lenses, multiple and long exposures, variable apertures and more.

In the days of instant yore, you were largely limited to the design of the camera–press the shutter and a positive spilled forth. It was a time when you did not shake it like a Polaroid picture because Outkast wasn’t a thing, and shaking it never actually did anything anyway.

Lomography’s carrying on in its own tradition of producing old-style cameras with contemporary sensibilities and off-kilter aesthetics. You’ll never see a Lomo-style camera come off the factory floor from the likes of Canon, Nikon, Sony or Fujifilm, and that shouldn’t happen.

If you digg customization and instant gratification, then head on over to Lomography’s Kickstarter campaign to back the project. If not, carry on. Or you could take a true DIY approach, and get an old instant camera off of eBay, figure out how it works, get it back to working condition, and find the right film.

Of course, the Lomo’Instant is a thing of its own, and is a fairly strong entry into the Lomo multiverse. The only instant offering we’ve reviewed was the instant back for the medium-format Bel-Air. The Lomo’Instant seems to be a new kind of Instant, and when we get one in for review, we’ll let you know how it is.