Film Emulsions with a Look You Can’t Get in Digital Photography

Lead photo by Doctor Popular. Used with a Creative Commons License.

There are loads and loads of film emulations that have been more or less copied with presets for Lightroom. Everyone has their own interpretation, and for the most part if you ask any film photographer, they’ll tell you that they don’t look like film. At the same time though, there are film emulsions out there that really don’t look like anything that can possibly be replicated in digital.

Here are some of our favorite film emulsions that digital hasn’t yet copied.

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Review: Lomography 32mm f2.8 Minitar Art Lens (Leica M Mount)

Most of Lomography’s art lenses have been a hit, but in the case of the Lomography 32mm f2.8 Minitar, I’m not totally sure I know what to think. There’s a fair amount going for it in terms of being super small and easily mountable to a Leica M camera body, but then there’s a lot of weirdness with the image quality. This lens is capable of being either pretty darn sharp or kind of kooky–and I’m not sure it’s kooky in a bad way or if it’s just some of Lomography’s charm trying to come off on us. But if you’re aware of how the Lomography LC-A works, this is basically the same lens.

If you’re a lover of really old analog lenses, then you may digg this one.

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5 Lenses That Deliver a More Unique Creative Look

As a photographer it is common to fall into ruts with your use of lenses, preferring one focal length or lens over your others, or a certain set of lenses over others. For some nice fast prime lenses are the culprit, for others maybe they are semi-fast zoom lenses, or something else. One thing is for sure – once you get your hands on the lenses you prefer it can sometimes be hard to find a reason to use a different lens unless the situation specifically calls for it over your usual favorite.

One way to help force yourself to change up your look and experiment more with your creative photography is to invest in some unique, creative lenses that offer something more than your standard, modern, optically perfect lens. Today we wanted to highlight several good quality lenses that may help you with this agenda and expand the creative potential of your kit without breaking the bank.  Continue reading…

Kate Hook’s Creative Portraiture with Lomography LomoChrome Purple

All images by Kate Hook. Used with permission.

Photographer Kate Hook was always into film photography–it stems from when she was really young. When she went to college, her friends never understood film and how to use it. But like a number of us millenials, Kate grew up in a world that started out with film, then went digital and is now going back to film. In college, she was the one who had to teach all her colleagues how to use it. Kate went digital for a while and then went back to film with the belief that you don’t need a whole lot of gear to create the best photos; just the right gear for you.

With that in mind, Kate has used the experimental Lomography LomoChrome Purple a few times to create some fantastic portraits. Along with shooting the film, she soups it in lemon juice. This is all part of Kate’s expressive creative process–which has roots partially in the loss of both of her parents.

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The Today Show’s Al Roker Produces Segment With All Analog Film Photos

In case you haven’t noticed, analog film photography is back! And as proof of that, the folks over at the Today Show did a special segment on it. But this wasn’t just any segment: the majority of it was shot with analog film photography through still images with voiceovers–something the Today Show’s Al Roker says has never been done before. The segment was shot on 35mm film, Fujifilm peel apart, Impossible Project film, Fujifilm Instax mini, Instax wide, and a bit of wet plate collodion.

Talk about an expensive production, right?

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How to Make the Most of One Light in a Portrait Studio

Working with a portrait subject in the studio first and foremost requires you to stop thinking about them necessarily as your subject and instead more as your collaborator. Now don’t get me wrong, you’re essentially going to be the conductor of the orchestra most of the time so to speak–but you need to think about people in a different way. You also don’t need the fanciest cameras, lighting, etc to make this work.

In fact, very soon we’ve got a special workshop dedicated to doing just this with Instax Wide film hosted at the Lomography Gallery Store in NYC. But if you’re interested in getting a sneak peak of what’s going to be taught, read on.

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Review: Leica Sofort (Fujifilm Instax Mini)

If you take one look at the Leica Sofort, you’ll wonder what makes this camera worth over $300 when there is so much resemblance to the Fujifilm Instax Mini 90. Photographers working with the camera will appreciate its fun and cute appearance in addition to its simple interface. Like all Instax film cameras, it has some quirks and this is less a result of the cameras as it is the film itself. You see, Instax film is set to ISO 800–so it’s always going to allow a lot of light to hit the surface.

But like most Instax cameras, you may not be totally happy with the results. I however and completely fine with them.

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