Film Review: Lomography LomoChrome Purple 100-400 (35mm, New Emulsion)

A while back, Lomography LomoChrome Purple was released in 120 and 35mm formats. But earlier this year, the company updated the formula to make it more stable. With it came the major improvement of making it easier to shoot with. The current LomoChrome Purple formula allows a photographer to get great results whether they’re shooting at ISO 400 or ISO 100. Lomography states that you can rate it at either setting, as opposed to the older formula which needed a lot of light to create the best images. This new emulsion is available only in 35mm, but it provides finer grain and still very nice colors.

So if you’re the type who only wants to shoot in 120, then the size may put you off. But make no mistake, the quality is absolutely there.

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Lomography Announces a Brand New Formula for LomoChrome Purple 400

It’s been a few years since Lomography announced LomoChrome Purple, and just today they’ve announced a new update to the film. The new Lomochrome Purple 400 film is designed to be a whole lot more stable. With that said, we start out with a recommended and set exposure at ISO 400 vs the previous version of the film which was said to need a lot of light. To that end, it wasn’t uncommon that photographers shot it at ISO 200 or even 100. The new Lomochrome Purple will continue to shift blues to greens, greens to purples and yellows to pinks. The new emulsion increases the film’s sensitivity to red hues.

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Lomography’s New Disposable Cameras Are Pretty Adorable

Lomography has some really cool and fun options now available for purchase: disposable cameras. The new Lomography disposable cameras have been tailored and designed more for ease of use than anything else. Additionally, they’re a lot like so many others too in that they strive to get everything in focus, use flash, and also use 35mm film. The disposable cameras are available in a three pack set.

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Film Emulsions with a Look You Can’t Get in Digital Photography

Lead photo by Doctor Popular. Used with a Creative Commons License.

There are loads and loads of film emulations that have been more or less copied with presets for Lightroom. Everyone has their own interpretation, and for the most part if you ask any film photographer, they’ll tell you that they don’t look like film. At the same time though, there are film emulsions out there that really don’t look like anything that can possibly be replicated in digital.

Here are some of our favorite film emulsions that digital hasn’t yet copied.

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Kate Hook’s Creative Portraiture with Lomography LomoChrome Purple

All images by Kate Hook. Used with permission.

Photographer Kate Hook was always into film photography–it stems from when she was really young. When she went to college, her friends never understood film and how to use it. But like a number of us millenials, Kate grew up in a world that started out with film, then went digital and is now going back to film. In college, she was the one who had to teach all her colleagues how to use it. Kate went digital for a while and then went back to film with the belief that you don’t need a whole lot of gear to create the best photos; just the right gear for you.

With that in mind, Kate has used the experimental Lomography LomoChrome Purple a few times to create some fantastic portraits. Along with shooting the film, she soups it in lemon juice. This is all part of Kate’s expressive creative process–which has roots partially in the loss of both of her parents.

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New Petition is Trying to Revive Kodak Aerochrome

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Image by Dan Zvereff. Used in our previous interview with him.

For all the lovers of the analog world out there, you should know that a recent Change.org petition to revive one of the greatest films that the world has seen: Kodak Aerochrome. Shooting Film first caught wind of the story and states that UK based Jasmin G is calling on Kodak Alaris and the Lomography company to revive the film. Lomography tried to do a variant called Lomochrome Purple, but it totally isn’t the same thing. While Lomochrome puts an emphasis on purple colors, Aerochrome put it on a pinkish purplish red.

How do they do this? For starters, Aerochrome was an infrared film originally developed for surveillance reasons. Years ago, the US would fly planes over the Congo and other regions with dense vegetation to find guerilla troops. When developed, the film would render the greens into a color like what you see in the image above that leads this story. However, later on the commercial world started to use it for art projects. Dan Zvereff and Richard Mosse are two famous photographers that come to mind at first. We have a full introduction to the film at this link–which also explains how it works.

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Richard Mosse: The Impossible Image Is A Film Shot on Infrared 16mm Film

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Richard Mosse has been getting loads of press lately since starting and working on his project in the Congo. He decided to use Kodak Aerochrome–which is an infrared film that renders greens to look red/purple/pink. Green is a color all over that area of the world and so the creative decision to use this film was an excellent and very original one.

So far, we’ve only heard about his still images, but Rich has also created a motion picture film shot on 16mm infrared film–basically the same Kodak Aerochrome. Sadly, the film is mostly gone now and the closest thing is the revived Lomography LomoChrome Purple.

There is a preview of the video after the jump.

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LomoChrome Purple Is Available for Pre-Order Again

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A while back, Lomography announced LomoChrome Purple. The first batch went out fast, and the second batch is now available for pre-order. It is available in 35mm and 120 formats. To refresh your memory, it is a film that is heavily based off of the old Kodak Aerochrome, which renders all greens as purples and pinks. This infrared film was also used for military applications, and lots more.

Still confused? We wrote a big guide about all this when it was first announced and it should help clear up the confusion. I was one of the first to pre-order a couple rolls of 120 film, and we will be sure to have a review on it as soon as we can get them shot and developed–let alone get me to a green spot. Lord knows there isn’t much in NYC.