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AFS_20_1.8G

In addition to the new D750 that Nikon has announced tonight, they’re also announcing a brand new 20mm f1.8 wide angle lens. This adds onto the company’s 85mm f1.8, 50mm f1.8, 35mm f1.8, and 28mm f1.8. The new wide angle lens is designed for full frame cameras and offers a super wide perspective. It sports a nano-crystal coating on the lenses, whisper quiet autofocus, and will set you back $799.99.

The lens has 13 elements in 11 groups, seven aperture blades, two ED elements, two aspherical elements, and roughly the same construction as Nikon’s other f1.8 lenses.

Nikon didn’t see a reason to stop at a lens though, they’re also announcing the new SB-500 flash. More details on that are after the jump.

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20130318_0008 Creating the Photograph is an original series where we interview photographers about a photo that they shot and how it was achieved. The results are some knowledge passed on to you. Want to be featured? Email chrisgampat[at]thephoblographer[dot]com. Lárus Sigurðarson is a photographer based in Iceland–and whose work that we absolutely fell in love with upon finding this image on his 500px page. He is a commercial, wedding, editorial, landscape and portrait photographer whose work is mesmerizing due to the ideas and scenes that he creates. Not only does he have excellent ideas, he is also a master of lighting and knows how to get the image that he has in his head based on his original concept. We asked Mr. Sigurdarson about his image above, called “Blue.” Here’s his story. [click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2 review product images (4 of 7)ISO 2001-400 sec at f - 1.7

When it comes to choosing an interchangeable lens camera and a system, consider the fact that you’re not really just buying a camera per se. Indeed, what you’re actually doing is buying into a membership club of some sort. And with that club you get the ability to do certain things. The camera will give you some features and the basic ability to take images to begin with. But then you’ll need to pair it with things that will help you to get the images you want. With that said, it’s about the lenses. And to get even better images, you’ll need lighting. Now consider this: your newer lenses will always make an older sensor look better, but a new sensor may not necessarily make older lenses deliver an image that looks better. Additionally, older lenses may not make the output from a new sensor look better.

But one thing is guaranteed: no matter how old the sensor and lens are, adding artificial lighting to your scene will make the output sharper and perhaps even look better when used correctly.

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All images by Bill Wadman. Used with permission.

NYC Photographer Bill Wadman is no stranger to the Phoblographer. He’s been featured here a number of times. First was on Creating the Photograph, then on his post on dynamic range, and this time around we’re captivated by his Portraits in the Corner series that he has been featuring for a while now on his blog. The idea was incredibly simple: get a bunch of folks, choose a corner, and shoot a portrait that tells a bit about who they are as people. Bill used photojournalism, traditional portrait posing and environmental portrait tactics to get the images in the series.

Unlike many other photographers, Bill did something that few of us have the fortitude to do. He worked through his obstacles and still commits.

We talked to Bill about Portraits in a Corner and the commitment it took.

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Joe McNally Lastolite Ezybox

Photographer have long known the best light for portraits is defused, directional light but what about adding some extra illumination in broad daylight? Despite how redundant it might seem to add even more light when the sun is high in the sky, sometimes an extra hint of fill light can make your pictures pop more and clearer.

Luckily professional photographer savant Joe McNally is here to show you how its done right. In an episode of Adorama TV video Joe shows off how the Lastolite Ezybox softbox paired with a Nikon SB-910 speedlight can add soft directional light to make a picture really sing.

Thanks to a new white interior for the Lastolite softbox that Joe thought up, the Ezybox adds a soft shower of illumination that naturally falls off the subject’s body. Normally the same softbox would come with a silver interior, which would produce a much crisper and contrasty image, but at the cost of producing a much brighter center of illumination. We much prefer the natural softer look of this the white Lastolite Ezyboz with the white lining too.

In case you were wondering what other gear Joe had on hand for the shoot he also used a Nikon D800E with a Nikkor 24-70mm f2.8G lens, and an Avenger C stand to hold his speedlight. Check past the jump to see the video.

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One of the absolute toughest technical things that you can learn in photography is how to create images that effectively blend both natural and strobe lighting. It’s a fine art in and of itself that requires carefully paying attention to certain aspects of the scene and having a distinct knowledge of shadows and how they can affect the final image. Then it also requires knowing how to either boost the abilities of natural light or filling in areas that you feel your final scene needs.

Here’s how to do it with some knowledge from the very start.

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