Digital to Analog: Daylight White Balance in Various Lighting Scenarios

As more and more photographers start going from digital to analog, we wanted to teach everyone about a big part of how you not only see light, but also color. Note that most film is balanced to daylight, so if you go about shooting with it in various situations, you’ll either like the results or you won’t.

So with that said, we’ve compiled a number of images from our archives showing you how colors in a scene render when using daylight white balance. This post encompasses mostly digital photos, and you should know when you go into a film lab to get your images developed, sometimes a technician will try to “fix the images”. But you should keep this in mind regardless to get your most desired results.

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The Simple First Step to Making Your Food Photography Look Better Every Time

This is one of the first steps that we’re going to teach in our Food Photography workshop later this month. It involves lighting your food in a different way and is just the first step involved with making your food photos look great. More importantly though, this is a piece of information that will help you make better lighting decisions every time.

But like everything else in photography: it isn’t always just technical info that makes a great photo.

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How to Make Your Images Look Sharp and Three Dimensional In Camera

One of the best things that you can do as a portrait photographer is find a way to really make your subject look like they’re popping off of the screen at your viewer (technically speaking of course!). With modern lenses it’s very simple to do, but even if you don’t have those, or the latest and greatest software, it’s still also quite possible if you just take a few careful steps.

And don’t worry, you don’t need to wait until golden hour.

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How Photographer Dieter Kohn Photographs the Rich With ISO 5 Ektacolor Paper

In the film world, there is positive and negative film, but each must be converted into a print form. One method used by Dieter Kohn on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Florida skips the film phase altogether – directly exposing Kodak Ektacolor paper for a ready to go, full-size print moments after capture.

This craziness is only possible with the help of a 500lb large format view camera. Kohn got the idea originally years a before he actually put it into use, but he ran into a snag. The Kodak paper he wanted to expose for the direct prints had an ASA (ISO) equivalent rating of 5-7. In other words, it required a ton of light in order to get a proper exposure.

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Creating the Photograph: Jason Lanier’s “Snow Queen”

Creating the Photograph is an original series where photographers teach you about how they conceived an image, shot it, and edited it. The series has a heavy emphasis on teaching readers how to light. Want to be featured? Email chrisgampat[at]thephoblographer[dot]com.

Photographer Jason Lanier has worked on a number of really, really super cool concepts in the past; and his recent Snow Queen project continues to show off that sometimes not everything needs to be created in the camera. On his YouTube channel, he uploaded a video taking us behind the scenes on the shoot where you begin to see a lot of what went into the image. Indeed, Jason uses lighting to create enough separation between the subject and the background but also to draw emphasis on key areas of the scene.

Over on his website and his blog, he shows even more photos from the shoot. But here’s what was going through his mind.

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Creating the Photograph: Dan Bannister’s “The Boxer”

Creating the Photograph is an original series where photographers teach you about how they concepted an image, shot it, and edited it. The series has a heavy emphasis on teaching readers how to light. Want to be featured? Email chrisgampat[at]thephoblographer[dot]com.

Photographer Dan Bannister has been featured on this site a number of times but most notably with the Blacksmiths. His work has evolved and more clients ask him to shoot video in addition to stills. And so the idea behind “the boxer” is an interesting one. “Walking into a set and shooting stills of what you see when it’s been lit for motion can be a real challenge, especially when the client needs the stills at F11,” says Dan.

And so Dan tells us about how he tackled the challenge.

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Learn To See Creatively (and other incredible education deals)

It’s that time of the week again, when we focus our deals coverage on the educational side of things. Gear is important, but keeping your creative mind sharp and learning new techniques is also an important thing for all photographers to do. Here are three quick hit deals that, if you look at nothing else in this post, you should see…

  • The Street Photographer’s Manual – $27% Off – Get It Here
  • Picture Perfect Posing: Practicing the Art of Posing for Photographers and Models – $40% Off – Get It Here
  • Retouching Academy’s Master Dodge & Burn Video Course – $72 Off – Get It Here
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Creating the Photograph: Danny Alexander’s “Pink Rose”

Creating the Photograph is an original series where photographers teach you about how they conceived an image, shot it, and edited it. The series has a heavy emphasis on teaching readers how to light. Want to be featured? Email chrisgampat[at]thephoblographer[dot]com.

Photographer Danny Alexander has tagged us in a number of his images on Instagram and we discovered him and his great strobist work this way. He’s a portrait photographer working in Louisville, KY. “I’ve slowly been turning my passion into a full time job and my work can be found in local and nationally published magazines,” says Danny. “Although I spend most of my time shooting editorial portraits, I do make time to work on creative personal projects. If I had to say I had a style in photography it would be that I take a strobist approach.” That’s perfect for our Creating the Photograph series.

In fact, Danny rarely works with just natural light. “I love the technical side of working with strobes to create interesting lighting in my portraits.” he states.

So that’s where the story of Pink Rose begins.

 

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