How the Inverse Square Law Affects Your Lighting

Whether you work extensively with flash and studio lighting or have a preference for natural and outdoor light, understanding the quality of light when you shoot is crucial to getting well-exposed photos. To our rescue comes the Inverse Square Law of Light, which sounds very intimidating but is actually one of the photometry concepts that largely governs our work as photographers.

Ohio-based Matt Day has found that whenever people hear of the Inverse Square Law of Light, they are immediately turned off because of the seemingly complicated math involved. That’s an obvious reaction, since we’re here to take photos and not solve equations, right? But as Matt explains in his video below, understanding this concept is very helpful for photographers since it tackles one of the fundamentals of good photography: working with light.

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What is High Key Lighting? How The Popular Lighting Technique Works With Portrait Photography

High key lighting is a technique that has been used for many, many years now. For the most part, you can associate it with a certain Amazon patent, but high key lighting has been used year after year for portrait photography and cinematography. Essentially, it gives your subject this sort of angelic, bright and airy look. These days it is typically more associated with backlighting a portrait subject. So if you love working with natural lighting, then you’ll probably really like high key lighting.

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Shooting Cityscapes at Night, From Composition to Lightroom

Feature image screen capture from video, all credit to Serge Ramilli.

Shooting cityscapes at night can be a great hobby for photographers and civilians alike: the city never moves, it’s always available to shoot, and you can do it at your leisure. During day or night most can take some breathtaking images that will capture the attention of your viewers. But if you are new to this, the idea of shooting at night may give you pause… so, let’s remedy that.

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The Beginner’s Guide to Using Gels as a Strobist Photographer

Gels are bound to scare away most portrait photographers and strobists simply because they don’t understand how to really use them. But one of the coolest things that you can do as a photographer is learn how to use gels to tell a different story in your portraits and overall in your photography. You see, gels color the light output of your flash which is typically balanced to Daylight and therefore is very cool. But once you understand that you can make that light all sorts of various colors, you’ll get how awesome it can be to use gels.

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How to Choose the Right Portrait Lens for You

Portrait photography, in general, is one of the most popular niches in the industry and often one of the first things a new photographer attempts to master as they hone their craft. But a key to appealing portraits is making a good lens selection based on the look you are attempting to produce.

Do you want to know how to choose the right portrait lens? Perfect, this post is for you. Let’s have a look at some of the key considerations before making your portrait lens selection. Continue reading…

Re-Constructed Food Pokes Fun at Food Photography Trends

All images by Greg Stroube. Used with a Creative Commons Permission.

Photographer Greg Stroube wanted to do something a bit creative, and so his Re-Constructed food photography series pokes fun at the deconstructed food trend. You see, this is a trend where photos pretty much just show off the ingredients that make up a larger, more complete meal. You’ve probably seen it all over the place as they’re sometimes pivotal to recipe photography and videos. So what Greg does is take the cooked food and tries to put it all back together again after each piece has been separated and cut.

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Creating Sharper Looking Portrait Photos Using Low Key Lighting

Low key lighting in portrait photography can do one really big thing for your subject: make them pop out from the background a whole lot more. I mean, isn’t that the whole point of portraiture? To make someone stand out and be the primary subject? When combined with very specific lighting, your subject can really come across front and center so to speak. So for the most part, I want you to imagine that an actor or actress is on stage for a bit of theatre. A spotlight comes in on them and the rest of the stage isn’t lit at all. In fact, it’s incredibly dark. So more or less, you’re really just seeing your subject and nothing else. That’s how low key lighting works.

So here’s how you make it work to create better portraits.

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