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Today, Elinchrom is announcing a brand new lineup of light modifiers. They’re called the Elinchrom LiteMotiv Direct modifiers–and they have 16 sides. If you though eight side with an octabank was quite a bit, this will take the cake. Elinchrom states that their intention was to form an almost perfect circle when it come to pitching the light output from the boxes.

You’ve got two sizes here: 48″ and 75″. Both of those are pretty darn big and the 75″ version will be larger than some people when deployed. The Litemotiv Direct modifiers come with a heavy-duty bracket and can accommodate Profoto, Broncolor, Elinchrom and Bowens mount lights.

Like Profoto, these speed rings also have color coding to make it easier for the photographer or assistant to assemble the modifiers–since, you know, 16 rods may take forever. After they’re done with that, they’ll prep the inner diffusion and outer diffusion layers. But without the diffusers, Elinchom is saying that the Litemotiv Direct will function like a beauty dish and this may partially be due to the deflectors that can lessen the effects of the light.

The Litemotiv 120cm/48” is priced at $509.00, and its bigger brother Litemotiv 190cm/75” is $1,299.00. Both systems come complete with a carrying bag.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm X100s the party weekend (26 of 31)ISO 64001-20 sec at f - 4.0

Learning about lighting (not necessarily learning to light) is something that every photographer should know and care about. Light is quite literally what helps you to create the images that you do– and it can be done very easily and very efficiently once you understand it. But you shouldn’t be intimidated by it. or at least this one simple exercise will make it easier for you.

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Screenshot taken from the video

Screenshot taken from the video

Photographer Lindsay Adler recently took to creativeLive to explain some of the most basic principles of light. She covers intensity, direction and quality–which are the three biggest factors that photographers use when describing light. She covers ratios, flat lighting, directional quality, and soft vs hard light. She also explains why one is not the other.

So how do you apply this knowledge, by internalizing what she says, you can then figure out what type of look you want for a photo. To help you out even more, we’ve provided examples after the jump along with explanations and Adler’s video.

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The shadow and fact that this image was lit on only one side makes this very low key

The shadow and fact that this image was lit on only one side makes this very low key

It’s common for Rembrandt lighting to be spoken about in the photo world–and its popularity is also often associated with its ease of creation. Rembrandt lighting is originally attributed to the famous painter whose portraits portrayed a subject with what appears to be window light hitting them. The light would bathe one side of the face in light and create a small triangle of light on the other side. The rest of it would be blocked by the nose or the other side of the face.

The way to get Rembrandt lighting to work is fairly simple and requires a large light source coming from a specific angle in addition the face being turned in a specific angle to create the triangle.

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ISO 400, 1/100th f2.8

ISO 400, 1/100th f2.8

While many photographers love to work with softboxes, there are many other light modifiers out there. But the single most versatile light modifier out there is the umbrella–and more specifically the convertible umbrella. An umbrella can function as many different light modifiers and the right one can be all you need in your lighting kit. Indeed, it’s a simple to use and very effective light modifier that gives you the most bang for your buck.

To understand why, you’ll need to understand more about how the umbrella works.

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mist_1k

All images by Franz Steiner. Used with permission.

Photographer Franz Steiner has creativity in his family. After receiving his father’s camera as a gift, Franz immediately got to work as a photographer after graduating college. Residing out in California, Franz wanted to do a documentary project on Dogtown: the famous town that inspired movies like the Lords of Dogtown and even the creation of the X Games. So when Dogtown Diary was all shot, what Franz wanted to do was create a special mood characteristic of the beautiful light that they get out on the West Coast.

The result? An incredible set of images that blend lifestyle and classic cool with a documentary perspective.

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