web analytics

light

IbarionexPhoblographerEvalLight01

We are dependant on light to make our photographs. So, it is important to learn to evaluate the quality of light that we have to work with to determine the final look of our photographs. Identifying and recognizing the qualities of the light results in us making important decisions regarding exposure, white balance and even camera position. Here are some questions to ask yourself to help you make the most of the light you have to work with whether you are photographing people, landscapes, food or abstracts.

[click to continue…]

Felix Esser The Phoblographer Lightroom 5 Black and White Conversion

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Check them out here.

Back in the days of film, when color wasn’t as commonplace as black-and-white, one of the most important things for any photographer to learn was to look past the colors they’d see in the viewfinder, and concentrate on the intensity of the light. Because when you shoot monochrome, you don’t get any color information, you get shades of grey. Equally important when shooting without color is composition, that is the various forms and shapes in an image and their relation to each another.

In general, learning to work with light and shapes is a good idea in photography, because it’ll help you get better pictures. Better in this case means pictures that are pleasing to the eye, and that evoke an emotional reaction in the viewer. Learning to see just the light and the shapes in an image, and to neglect all color information, is not an easy task. But luckily, in this day and age of digital cameras, there’s an easy and effective trick that’ll help you not be distracted by colors.

[click to continue…]


Chris Gampat Black and White Photo (1 of 1)

Digital has provided a surprising resurgence in black and white photography. The ability to create a monochrome image either in camera or later in Photoshop is much more accessible than having to work in a traditional darkroom. But it takes more than removing the color from an image to make a great black and white. Here are some tips that will help you to make exceptional black and white imagery.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Impact Quikbox and LiteTrek photos (10 of 17)ISO 200

Shooting with a flash in the middle of the day? Why would you do that? Believe it or not, you’ll want to use a flash during the day more than any other period. Well for starters, you can sometimes get better looking images than what a normal camera and lens can give you and you can also create images that might be otherwise tough to do. You’ll also find that shooting with a flash in the middle of the day can teach you a lot more about the way that light works.

If you want crisper, cleaner, sharper images and to boost the already great effects that natural light has, read on.

[click to continue…]

ray-flash-2-the-phoblographer

If you haven’t heard of the Ray Flash before, you’re missing out. It is an adapter that takes existing light from your hot shoe flash and puts it into a ring shape. The look is highly valued by fashion photographers and in photo booths. Today though, ExpoImaging is announcing the Ray Flash 2. Besides a reworked external design, it mostly seems like the same product. A couple of the changes are a new universal flash head mount (the previous one needed to be paired with specific flashes) and the fact that it comes in a long or short version. The short versions are designed for smaller cameras like Canon Rebels; but according to the compatibility list it doesn’t seem to jive too well with some mirrorless options. The long version on the other hand works with lots of higher end DSLRs and the OMD EM5.

The Ray Flash 2: Universal Ring Flash Adapter is now available in the U.S. through photo specialty resellers nationwide, or online at the ExpoImaging Store.  The Ray Flash 2 retails for $139.95.

We’re going to try to call in a review unit, but in the mean time you should check out our review of the original Ray Flash and our introduction to Ring Flash.

IGNITOR_REFLECTOR_MOVEMENT_2

There are lots of accessories out there that promise that they’ll take your pop-up flash’s light and make it look more professional. The newest (and perhaps the most complicated) addition to the bunch is called the Flekt. The accessory seems to work in almost the same way that a beauty dish does. To lay that out a bit more: your pop-up flash is a direct lighting source. The direct light is placed inside a small dish that reflects the light output back onto a panel. This way the light is being reflected and then bounced forward onto your subject.

Given the design, we also expect it to act like a beauty dish–which means that there is a range at which this would best be used.

The Kickstarter launches today: January 24th. And the video is after the jump.

[click to continue…]