We/You All Suck at Street Photography; and That’s Okay


Street Photography isn’t simple and instead is something that requires a number of incredible parallel factors to all line up accordingly–and when cameras start to do nothing else but constantly log life at a higher resolution, it will require human elements beyond algorithms scrubbing for “good images” to actually have someone call themselves an artist. The art form has obviously become more and more popular with Instagram, EyeEm, and VSCO becoming a norm for photographers and people who just like taking pictures. Everyone has the potential to become a fantastic street photographer; but not everyone has the affinity, devotion, and understanding of the art to truly make it work.

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Review: Foldio 360 Product Smart Turntable Photography Tent


There are two different styles of product photography: lifestyle and the stagnant plain background. For years, both have challenged many people. Lifestyle product photography will always be more complicated while the plain background is more studio style in a controlled environment. But perhaps one of the simplest and most fun way of actually doing the stagnant, plain jane background type of photography is with the Foldio 360. As a super portable, app connected option, the Foldio 360 makes product photography really, really fun.

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Useful Photography Tip #167: Have Your Subject Face Your Key Artificial Light Source

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Expoimaging Rogue Flashbender soft silver portraits of Anna (1 of 12)ISO 1601-250 sec at f - 2.8

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

Hey strobist photographers: if you’re shooting a portrait of someone, the best thing that I’ve learned over the years is to actually make them face your artificial key light source. Of course, you wouldn’t do this with a natural one light the sun–but you can surely create more flattering portraits with a strobe or flash in a light modifier like a softbox, umbrella, etc.

Having your subject face the light source:

  • Makes the light look softer
  • Makes the light more flattering
  • Eliminates shadows on their face and sometimes body that may otherwise be unflattering
  • Gives them what I like to call the flattering spotlight effect.

When they’re facing the light source and the light source is shining directly down onto them, they’re illuminated to a certain point where they’re clearly made to be the main point of the photo. However, the light source isn’t as harsh as a spotlight, so it’s naturally more flattering.

As an extra tip: place the modifier so that the actual source of light is slightly above eye-level of the subject.

Also note: It doesn’t need to be direct; the light source can be slightly off to the left or right too.

Lighting Basics: How to Light Portraits with an Umbrella

Pro Tip: Use an umbrella with a light hidden inside to create a really cool effect.

Model: Bec Fordyce

As my portraiture has evolved over the years, the mainstay of my kit remains to be large umbrellas. The light modifiers are incredibly adaptable, give off a beautiful look, and are very portable in addition to being useful for creative applications. Umbrellas are so versatile that they’re used be a variety of photographers: fashion, wedding, studio portrait, food, etc. After softboxes, they’re probably the ones with the most versatility and popularity overall.

Part of their popularity has to do with how they work and just how effective they can be at delivering a variety of looks.

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The Step By Step Basics of Using Studio Lights for Portraiture

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 80D portraits of Erica (6 of 7)ISO 16001-60 sec at f - 1.4

When you finally want to get into studio lighting being involved in your photography, we will always recommend strobes over constant lights. Part of this is because they have something called a flash duration that can affect the way that the scene looks overall. It’s the difference between being able to darken a sky with ease or not.

Studio lights, as many of you know, can also be shot outside of the studio. But using them just requires you to understand a few new things.

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The Mentality Behind Capturing More Visually Interesting Images

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Mint Camera InstantFlex TL70 product images (14 of 16)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

Some photographers go through the world simply looking at scenes and only capturing what looks interesting to them at the time–and in attempt to capture a scene just the way that they see it. That’s fine–and it works out pretty well most of the time. In contrast, have you tried something new?

What about the idea of going about places and looking at the shapes? Or the colors? Lots of photographers these days start out by being self taught–and if you just embrace some of the more principle pillars of art, you’ll see just how much extra potential your images have.

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5 Tips to Take Better Restaurant Food Pictures

The Salt Room

This is a syndicated blog post from Xavier D. Buendia. It and the images here are being used with permission.

Hello, as you might know by now, I spend a good part of my time taking pictures in restaurants. I shoot interiors and exteriors, I do action shots and portraits but one of the things that I enjoy the most is shooting food and plated dishes.

Shooting food at restaurants is the most challenging part of the job and it is also what I get asked the most about by bloggers, reviewers and foodies; they tend to create incredible images when shooting in their kitchens and living rooms; but often struggle when they take it to a restaurant. There are so many things to think of and look at when shooting a dish so here are five basic tips that will help you improve your restaurant photography.

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