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Recently I spent almost two weeks on a trip to Iceland with a primary purpose of shooting landscapes of the amazing country. It is always hard to guess exactly what I would need, especially considering I am more of a portrait photographer than a landscape photographer and am not especially experienced at landscapes, though like nearly all photographers, I love shooting landscapes.

I want to go through what I decided to pack for my trip to Iceland, why I decided to pack it, and what I would do differently if I knew what I knew now after two weeks in Iceland.

Editor’s Note: This is a guest blog post from former Phoblographer staffer Thomas Campbell

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All images by Jeremy Scurto. Used with permission.

Most photographers know that shooting Polaroids and instant film is very slow and exacting process when you’re using true medium format cameras and not the ones actually made by Polaroid themselves. But somehow or another photographer Jeremy Scurto was able to figure out a way to capture an entire skateboard sequence on Polaroid film. And the way that he did it is incredibly clever. Jeremy started taking Polaroid photography seriously at the start of this year. “I had always messed around with digital and 35mm but this form really stuck with me.” says Jeremy. “I use a range of different Polaroids now from the RZ to the 600SE and even a few land cameras I have as daily point-and-shoots.”

To get the image above and the ones you’ll see after the jump, Jeremy loaded three Mamiya RZ67s and 50mm f4.6 lenses with Fujifilm FP-3000B and used three different shutter releases. By placing them all in the exact right location and firing the shutters off in the correct sequence, he was able to capture these scenes in unison. “The way we got the three RZ’s to fire off in sequence was to have them all set up with shutter release cables. I held the cables in my left hand with the mirrors locked up ready to fire. I then rolled my right palm over them, bang bang bang, that’s all she wrote.”

In our eyes, it’s pretty clever and incredibly beautiful. The other images are after the jump.

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Review: Nikon D810

by Chris Gampat on 08/17/2014

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

The Nikon D810 is the latest flagship DSLR from Nikon without a vertical grip attached. Coming in two years after the D800 and D800E; it is seen as the replacement for both cameras. For the most part, Nikon has given users some very minor upgrades in the same way that Canon didn’t offer too much change from the 5D Mk II to the Mk III. Most notably with the D810 is the modest bump in megapixels with no AA filter, the D4s’ autofocusing system, better high ISO output, and something that Nikon users have been asking for for a very long time: small RAW mode. Indeed, with this camera it is now possible to not fill up your computer’s hard drive after a single professional shooting session.

The Nikon D810 is a heck of a lot of camera that we don’t think that everyone needs at all. And those that would make the best use of it are those that make a living from selling their images. But for many of those people, the upgrade may not be enough.

For others: the Nikon D810 may be the camera that makes you drop your current system and switch over immediately.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Essentials the Location Shooter (10 of 10)ISO 2001-80 sec

I have a confession to make: I wanted all the gear years ago. My entry point was the Canon 5D Mk II many, many moons ago. I wanted loads of L glass and I wanted to qualify for Canon Professional Services. Back then, you needed two pro level cameras, at least three of the lenses on their recommended list, and had to prove that you’re a working professional. It was going to be awesome. So I went on a quest. I started with a Canon 50mm f1.8–the nifty 50 that everyone gets first. After this I scored the 24-105mm f4 L. Next was the old 80-200mm f2.8 L. Then moved onto a 50mm f1.4. Then the 7D. Then a 35mm f1.4 L. Then an 85mm f1.8. Then flashes came into play. And triggers. And light modifiers. Before I knew it, my camera bag was getting really full and I needed another one.

But then other companies started to develop some amazing technology and I wanted a smaller camera. The Olympus EP2 became my next purchase after getting and using a bunch of Canon L glass and primes. It was small, could take great photos in the right situations, and felt great in the hands. But then the EP3 came out–and it was perhaps the fastest focusing camera in the world. And a spiral happened.

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Local Festival To Refine Your Concert Photography gservo-02287-20140713-2

If you are a photographer who enjoys music, we’re positive that you’d had the urge to be a concert photographer. It’s a hard field to get into, and if you really want to improve, you have to sell your soul on occasion to get close to the stage. The are a lot of hurdles in the way to getting better at this style of photography. But one of the biggest issues newer photographers can have is access–but local free festivals provide an excellent opportunity for practice that doesn’t cost your soul. Here are some tips to use them to your advantage.

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Adapters gservo-3628-20140629-3

I have used lens adapters on mirrorless cameras–just like loads and loads of other users do. When I made the decision to buy the Sony A7, my previous experience with adapters influenced my purchase. Instead of buying Sony lenses, I would keep on using my Nikon lenses. It had been suggested one would have to be insane to use Nikon lenses with a Sony camera, which doesn’t make sense to me. With this decision I knew there would be some sacrifice. Yes, it would have been easy just to buy another Nikon camera, but I wanted something that was full-frame and mirrorless. Nikon is not creating the cameras that I want, but I love my Nikon glass.

And with that, begins my story of what I lose with adapters.

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