Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 in 120 Medium Format Film is Available for Pre-Order

Bellamy Hunt told us that Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 120 would be coming soon, and today he’s announcing that it’s available for pre-order. The film, which is popular with the 35mm film photography world, has finally sold enough that Bellamy decided that it would make sense to have it in a larger film emulsion. Street Pan 400 is unlike many of the others out there with the exception of a few Ilford emulsions. Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 is a near infrared film that needs a lot of light unlike Kodak Tri-X, Fujifilm Acros and a number of others. So if you’re using it then you’ll need to give it more light or expose it at box speed vs pushing it.

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The Spark Camera Remote Triggers Your Camera Via Bluetooth

Alpine Labs has launched yet another successful Kickstarter campaign with their brand new camera remote: and it’s called the Spark. Why? Honestly I’m not sure, but if you’re one of the few photographers who has a camera that doesn’t have WiFi built in, then this could be a great product for someone like you. The Spark is being aimed at hobbyists, folks who shoot outdoors a lot, millennials with way too much money, and timelapse shooters (sort of.) Plus, it connects to your camera in a number of different ways.

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Jack Seikaly: Digital Infrared Photography Influenced by Kodak Aerochrome

All images by Jack Seikaly. Used with permission.

“I’m a confused pessimist at heart. I view a world that is in a constant state of chaos and anarchy, generally getting worse over time,” says Jack Seikaly about his infrared photography. “The message I try to portray in my infrared shots is this: ‘the world may be terrible, but look at all the beauty it also has to offer.'”

Born in London, raised in Beirut, and living in Montreal, Jack has been given the privilege to view the world from multiple perspectives and understand different cultures. Along the way, he’s been taking photos. Like many others out there, he was infatuated with the HDR photography process until he started to go towards the world of Infrared. “I’ve now opened my eyes to the wonders of infrared, continuously evolving my technique and style,” he tell us.

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A Different Wavelength to Inspire: Landscapes in the Infrared Spectrum

“Have you done any photo projects?” This is a question I loathed answering for a long time. I am asked this question several times a year and my response makes me cringe. “No, I haven’t done any sort of photo projects.”

Ugh…Inadequacy. As an Olympus Trailblazer, I am inspired by this type of work from my peers, and I knew it was my turn.

I have always wanted to put together some sort of cohesive series of images. However, over the years I have never found anything that I felt would make a good personal project for me.

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Freestyle Photographic Dropped Their Prices on Rollei Film and Developer

Very recently, Freestyle Photographic sent out an email to their customers letting them know about some really super deals on Rollei film. In fact, the prices are better than anything I’ve been able to find on both Amazon and B&H Photo. So whenever I can, I’m all for supporting the little guy.

Not only are the price drops on film though, they’re also on development chemicals.

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Infrared NYC: Central Park Like You Have Never Seen It Before

All Images By Paolo Pettigiani. Used with Permission. 

“I love the majesty and the contrast of nature included in the famous Big Apple’s skyscrapers, so I decided to highlight this contrast using infrared photography inviting viewers into a world unseen.” Paolo Pettigiani says of his Infrared NYC series, which highlights images of Central Park in infrared/aerochrome.

Mr. Pettigiani has been working with Infrared photography for much of the last two years, mainly focusing on landscapes around his home town of Turin. Over time, he developed the idea for his Infrared NY series, eventually settling on Central Park as the location. “I wanted to show one of the most famous place in the world, as never seen before. I chose this place because I wanted to capture the unique environment of Central Park, an Island of Paradise within the city.”

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Slices of Silence: Quiet Black and White Infrared Landscapes

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All photos by Nathan Wirth. Used with permission.

“I also don’t work on photography unless the weather is shitty.” says photographer Nathan Wirth, who was born and raised in San Francisco. He is a self-learned photographer that uses a variety of techniques— including long exposure and infrared— to express his unending wonder of the fundamental fact of existence by attempting to focus on the silence that we can sometimes perceive in between the incessant waves of sound that often dominate our perceptions of the world. This is partially the foundation for his project: Slices of Silence.

It also has a bit to do with Nathan’s recent studies involving Japanese traditions of Zen, rock gardens, and calligraphy– as well as the transience, impermanence, and imperfections of wabi-sabi. Nathan’s studies of calligraphy and Zen writings have led him to the practice of trying to achieve, while working on his photography, a mind of no-mind (mu-shin no shin), a mind not preoccupied with emotions and thought, one that can, as freely as possible, simply create.

This project features infrared landscape shot with a Sony camera–and while we think they’re quite dark and foreboding, Nathan personally does not.

We chatted with Nathan about his work for Slices of Silence and about how he almost didn’t become a photographer.

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The Fujifilm X-T1 IR Shoots Infrared Images

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Based on all the success that the Fujifilm X-T1 gained, the company has gone ahead and created an infrared version of their award winning camera. According to the company’s press release, it’s going to be marketed to crime scene investigation, fine art photography, healthcare diagnostics and observation professionals. Externally, it’s identical to the X-T1, but it’s what’s on the inside that counts.

It maintains the X Trans Sensor–which the other cameras have and that randomizes colors. But when it comes to infrared work, you’ll get different results. For starters, this is a 16.3MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS II sensor that can capture UV light. Specifically, the company states “Professional-grade infrared technology from the ultraviolet (UV), visible and infrared (IR) portions of the spectrum (approximately 380nm – 1,000nm)” The standard IR cut filter has been removed and an anti-reflective coating has been applied to the sensor according to what Fujifilm tells us.

More tech specs are after the jump. When it comes to America, it’ll cost you $1,699.95.

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