Review: Canon 77D

The logic behind the Canon 77D is one that in some ways doesn’t really make sense to me. But if Canon believes that it will get them sales, then so be it. However, with at least three Rebels, two mid tier, and one high end tier APS-C camera there’s a lot of head scratching to do. I mean, why not do something similar between the 5D series and the 1D series? Or between the Canon 5D and 6D? Either way there are surely a number of really interesting things about the Canon 77D such as the 24MP APS-C sensor, the interestingly pleasant ergonomic controls, the autofocus that almost never missed a shot, and Canon’s incredibly simple and straight forward menu interface that I wish everyone else would get half as right.

Though to be fair, it shouldn’t be this expensive.

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Review: Canon EOS M6 (Canon EF-M Mount)

If you were to look at the mirrorless camera world, it would appear that Canon, with the Canon M6, is an entry into the world where they’re still trying to find themselves. To some, they could look like an experimental 20 something trying in vain to get their life together. Yet somehow or another, I genuinely never thought that I’d like the Canon M6. The camera isn’t designed to be the highest end mirrorless camera from Canon, yet somehow or another it’s a camera that surely deserves respect in some ways and groans of frustration at the fact that Canon has gotten this camera almost perfectly right yet it feels like they were purposely holding themselves back. The Canon M6 has at its heart a 24MP APS-C sensor which is smaller than all the other options out there from Fujifilm, Sony, Pentax, Sigma–and let’s be honest because they’re all more or less made by Sony. Designed for the enthusiast, the Canon M6 has some very tough competition from the entire camera world. Yet somehow or another, this truly is a camera that you need to personally experience to understand.

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Review: Sony a9

It took Sony long enough, but earlier this year the company announced a true flagship mirrorless camera: the Sony a9. The Sony a9 is designed to take on the likes of the Canon 1DX Mk II and the Nikon D5. It’s a camera designed for a photojournalist who needs not a whole lot of resolution but a balance between that and good high ISO output. To appeal to these photographers, Sony gave the Sony a9 an impressive 20 fps shooting ability with no blackout of the viewfinder. The autofocus is also very effective, and can be used with a variety of lenses designed for the Sony E mount. Other connections such as a built in ethernet port and dual card slots are also bound to be very valuable to these photographers. Indeed, the Sony a9 is a camera for the working pro who brings in gainful employment and taxable income using their camera. With that said, you’d be absolutely stupid to purchase this for street photography unless you’re making some serious money off of it–so just stop right there.

Despite how fantastic it is, Sony still hasn’t gotten it 100% perfectly right. But to be fair, neither have Canon or Nikon.

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Gallery: Sony a9 High ISO Image Samples (And Extended Impressions)

We’re almost done with our review of the new Sony a9 camera; and so far it’s shaping up to mostly be pretty great. This post is to mostly showcase High ISO image samples from the new Sony a9, and before we go on you should know that it does a fantastic job and I personally like the high ISO output even more than I do from the Sony a7s II. The Sony a9 is targeted at the professional photographer who uses the Canon 1DX Mk II and the Nikon D5. But in some ways it also is trying to go after the Pentax 645z, the Hasselblad X1D and the Fujifilm GFX 50s with the wedding photography crowd. For the most part, those photographers will have found one of the best cameras that they can use.

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Review: Fujifilm X100F

In many ways, the Fujifilm X100F is both the closest thing to a perfect camera and the most infuriating camera at the same time. By itself, the Fujifilm X100F boasts quite a bit of upgrades over its predecessor, the X100T, that truly make it competitive and viable. And as always, it isn’t at all a bad camera; but it could have been something much better. With the same 24MP X Trans Sensor at the heart of the company’s two flagship cameras, and that retro-gorgeous camera body that makes lots of photographers weak in the knees, the Fujifilm X100F will undoubtedly sell well–and it deserves to.

But after four iterations of the camera, there are things about it I still don’t understand.

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Four Cameras Capable of Making Pleasing, Big Prints at Higher ISOs

One of the problems with digital photography for years has been high ISO output. While it’s become much better when you look at the photos on a screen, it’s still not perfect when it comes to printing. With film, you can tell that you’re looking at film grain when you enlarge and print a photo at something like 17×22 paper. But with digital, you’re bound to find digital looking noise; and it’s very apparent in the color noise, etc. But in the past few years, a few cameras have come around that produce fantastic results at higher ISOs. Here are some of our favorites.

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Review: Fujifilm GFX 50S Mirrorless Medium Format Digital Camera

For years and years, a lot of us have been drooling over the idea of mirrorless medium format digital cameras, and the Fujifilm GFX 50S is one of the first offerings to make it onto the scene. Fujifilm opted to take the same route that Leica, Pentax and Hasselblad have done with a sensor built into a body vs the more traditional SLR styles of Phase One and some of Hasselblad’s lineup. The Fujifilm GFX 50s (price) you’d think would be targeted at the photographer who needs that kind of resolution, but instead it’s aimed at the photographer who typically uses a Canon 1Dx Mk II or Nikon D5 type of camera. Essentially, the highest end of the highest end. Weddings? Yup, this is for that. Sports? Well, that’s where Fujifilm starts to hit a wall.

However, the camera is an alternative option: opting instead for better resolution and a larger sensor in the same way that wedding photographers years ago reached for 645 medium format film cameras.

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Shooting with the Fujifilm GFX 50S: Extended Thoughts and Sample Images

The Fujifilm GFX 50S has been in for review for a few days now and I’m sort of wrapping my head around how to test it correctly. That’s kind of tough to explain for many reasons. You see, Fujifilm sent me the camera along with the 63mm f2.8 and the 120mm f4 lenses–both primes which are great for general work, portraiture, and the mainstay of most medium format photographers out there. Zooms are often tough to work with, but in some ways I feel like Fujifilm is genuinely trying to redefine the way people work with medium format cameras, lenses, and sensors.

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