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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The year is 2014, and we as photographers have been bred to believe notions that have come from the film days and early days of digital photography. When film was king, photographers would try to not shoot with film above ISO 400 when publishing their images. And in the earliest days of digital photography, the same thing happened. But then something happened: the high ISO output became better and better. There were articles saying that ISO 1600 is the new 400.

And they were right. But at the same time something else happened. Software manufacturers started to come up with ways for you to fix that high ISO noise or even embrace it to make an image look beautiful.

The year is 2014. And we’re still bitching and complaining about high ISO noise despite the fact that the process of creating an image doesn’t stop when the camera’s shutter clicks and cocks itself back into position. In fact, it never stopped there even back in the film days. The photographer would go into the darkroom and spend time developing, pushing and pulling, or working with the images. And today is no different.

But something else has happened.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 7D MK II review product images (1 of 10)ISO 4001-30 sec at f - 4.0

We’ve been waiting many years for it, and this year the Canon 7D MK II has finally come. Canon in years past has been a very conservative company when it comes to new products. Not many changes have been made to many of their previous offerings with the Canon Rebel series being the most obvious amongst these. The 7D Mk II though is a camera surely designed for current Canon customers and users.

With a modest bump in the megapixel count from 18 to 20.9MP, the 7D Mk II also delivers better high ISO results than many of its immediate competitors. And while this can be a huge selling point, there is something holding that back.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Canon G7x is a bit of an odd duck–while the company for many years has chosen to carve their own path for their products, the G7X is billed as being the little sibling to the G1X Mk II. But at the same time, it comes off as a nod to Sony’s RX100 series of cameras. In fact, it even uses a 1 inch sensor–though the company does not state where they got it from. But there are also characteristics of the camera that hold true and are in line with the S series that they created many years ago. For starters, there’s a giant control ring around the lens that clicks and that has always been looked at as a successful addition.

And while this sensor, a fair zoom lens, WiFi and a touchscreen all make up what the camera is, it also feels like Canon purposely tried to cripple the G7x.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 7D Mk II first impressions images (1 of 7)ISO 2001-160 sec at f - 3.2

Today is a sad, sad day for many Canon users. Photo Rumors is reporting that the 7D Mk II’s sensor seems very subpar in comparison to many of the latest DSLRs and APS-C sensors. According to DxOMark the 7D Mk II, which received a modest megapixel bump from the earlier version should have performed amazingly given Canon’s history of innovation. Unfortunately, the sensor here is on par with that of much older cameras. In fact, the sensor from the Nikon D300s outperforms it in some ways.

To put this in perspective, the D300s was one of the first cameras that we reviewed on the site. That was almost five years ago.

More after the jump.

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The Phoblographer Fujifilm X30 review images product shots (2 of 10)ISO 2001-200 sec at f - 2.8

The Fujifilm X30 is a camera that has gone through incredible changes since the original X10 and the X20. For starters, Fujifilm decided to remove the OVF completely and work with just an EVF. Additionally, there have been modifications to the autofocus and how it works amongst many ergonomic changes to make the camera feel better to use. One of the bigger changes is the addition of WiFi connectivity to transfer your images to a smart device.

Otherwise, the camera has a 1/2″ sensor coming in at 12MP with a 28-112mm equivalent lens that starts at 2.0 and ends at f2.8 at the more telephoto side. The lens’s minimum aperture is f11–which makes sense for such a small sensor. Then there are additions to the video features, but Fujifilm has never been known for the video in their X series models and many photographers that use them really do so just for stills. Indeed, Fujifilm has been known for creating cameras for photographers.

The X30 has a lot going for it, and in many ways, it could be the company’s best camera yet for street photography.



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Review: Leica XE

by Chris Gampat on 10/09/2014

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Leica XE product images (2 of 10)ISO 4001-200 sec at f - 2.5

Leica has long been known as a company that has paved the way for modern photography. But in recent years, they seem to be taking the back seat to many Korean and Japanese manufacturers. Still though, Leica has their core customers and considering economic disparity these days, there are many folks with deep pockets that want all their cameras. But Leica’s X series of cameras haven’t always been a big hit. Sure, they’ve got an APS-C sensor at the heart, a nice size, and beautiful looks–but when you start talking about the price you’ll want to cry a bit and wish that you were a trust fund kid living in Williamsburg.

But recently at Photokina 2014, Leica decided to try again. This time, the Leica XE has a 16.2MP APS-C sensor, a 24mm f2.8 lens, and a 2.7 inch 230 Dot LCD (which actually isn’t too bad in real life practice). But otherwise, the camera is still very much the same. Considering that Leica is slow to innovate, we can only expect so much.

What we didn’t expect, on the other hand, is to be this surprised by the camera.

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