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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 27mm f2.8 first impressions (14 of 18)ISO 8001-60 sec at f - 2.8

It was at a party a few weeks ago here in Istanbul that I asked a working photojournalist what she shoots with. Given that she’s worked in conflict zones, I was curious about her equipment. “Canon,” she told me. I pushed the line of inquiry a bit further and asked, “5D Mark II? Mark III?” She replied, “Yeah, 5D.” That essentially ended the conversation, and it wasn’t the first time a photographer’s given me a vague answer about gear. On many occasions, I’ve heard that it’s not about the camera, it’s about the person holding the camera, and that’s true. Yet, without the camera, we would all just be folks with an eye for composition and a natural sense of light, and the visual record of the past 150 years or so would be virtually nonexistent. The subtext underlying the resistance to talking about gear seems to be that it’s somehow amateurish and unimportant, and that notion is hogwash.

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julius motal sony ff black white

This nifty diagram shows how the Leica M Monochrom can deliver greater sharpness than other cameras that shoot in color, and Sony may have a stronger answer to Leica’s $8,000 monochromatic wunderkind. According to a level 3 rumor on Sony Alpha Rumors, Sony may be working on a full-frame black and white sensor for the RX line of compact cameras. Think RX1, but in black-and-white.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 27mm f2.8 first impressions (14 of 18)ISO 8001-60 sec at f - 2.8

With a few weeks to go before the end of May, when I was due to fly out to Istanbul for a summer internship, I found that I was in the market for a new camera. I’ve been a Sony shooter for the past four years, and since I would be photographing quite a lot for the internship, I wanted to have another camera. If my a580 bit the dust, it would be far too expensive to replace it here in Istanbul, and I couldn’t take that chance. I was caught between an a99 and any of Fujifilm’s offerings. I ultimately went with the X-Pro1.

Here’s why.

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Sony A7s sensor

We knew that Sony’s new A7S would be a low-light monster. We knew it would provide outstanding image quality due to its super large pixels. We knew that it would put pretty much any other full-frame camera to shame. What we didn’t know is that it would even rival medium format systems in terms of pure image quality. Or at least, that is what Michael Reichmann with The Luminous Landscape claims.

Reichmann has just posted his first-impressions review of Sony’s new 4K-capable full-frame mirrorless camera, and he seems to be quite smitten with the product. Thanks to its large pixels, which are twice the size as those of the A7, and three times the size as those of the A7R, the camera produces not only super clean high ISO images, but also renders a certain look that Reichmann likens to that of medium format cameras.

Compared to the 36MP A7R, Reichmann finds that the A7S produces superior images at ISO settings beyond 1,600. And while the A7R’s output becomes pretty much unusable (in his opinion) at ISO 12,800, the A7S holds up well until ISO 51,200 “with some moderate noise reduction.” As for dynamic range, Reichmann claims he does not see a difference between the A7S and A7R, but admits that this may need further testing.

Another aspects that he likes about the camera, apart from the possibility to record 4K video, is its electronic front curtain shutter, which helps make the camera virtually silent during exposure. This is something that wedding photographers, among others, might find to be a great benefit, as it helps take pictures more stealthily.

After reading Reichmann’s first impressions over at The Luminous Landscape, we can hardly wait until our own review unit comes in and we can put it through its paces.

Via Sony Alpha Rumors

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon 35mm product images (3 of 6)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 3.5

We have just shared our first impressions of the new Nikon 35mm f1.8 G, Nikon’s latest wide-angle lens for full-frame (FX format) cameras. Being only 2/3rds of a stop slower than the 35mm f1.4 G, the lens is a viable alternative for those with slightly slimmer wallets. What we’re most curious about, then, is how the more affordable full-frame 35mm in Nikon’s lens stable performs compared to its proven f1.4 sibling.

DxOMark has just put the lens under scrutiny, and thanks to the comparison tool available on their website, we get a pretty good impression of how it performs compared to the 35mm f1.4. With both lenses mounted to a Nikon D800 (we would’ve preferred to see the results with a D800E, but the 35mm f1.4 was not tested on that camera,) it becomes apparent that despite the huge difference in price, the difference in performance is only marginal.

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Sony A7 gservo-20140606-3528

While I did not sell everything for my Sony A7, owning it is a paradigm shift for me. Ever since I first got a preview of the Sony A7 at PhotoPlus 2013, it has been on my radar. It got our Editor’s Choice award when we reviewed it, and it was the only mirrorless camera that ever truly piqued my interest. I wondered, is the A7 a viable camera for portraits,weddings, and other styles of photography? Well after all that thought and a price decrease from Sony, I picked up an A7 with a 28-70mm kit lens. A few people had to pick up their jaws from the ground, so I figured I would explain my purchase.

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