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Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Fujifilm X30 Product Images 2

Since it’s introduction the Fujifilm X10 and X20 has always felt a little bit lacking compared to its X100s brother. It’s always sported an optical viewfinder that was good but did not truly vibe well with the camera’s zoom lens. Now Fujifilm has gone in the opposite direction and given the new X30 a full-time EVF plus a few other upgrades that will make everyone notice its new street shooter.

Like the Fujifilm X-T1’s fabled viewfinder, the X30 sports a big 2.36M dot OLED Real Time Viewfinder. It has the same 0.005-second lag time, but comes with a slightly lower magnification factor at 0.65x. Fujifilm has also fitted a new tilting LCD with double the resolution at 920k dots–which isn’t a whole lot in comparison to many other modern cameras.

Otherwise the X30 is largely the same camera as the X20 featuring the same 12MP X-Trans CMOS sensor and 7.1-28.4mm f2-2.8 zoom lens. At the front of this 4x zoom lens users will find a newly added control ring positioned behind the manual zoom control to adjust aperture and shutter speed. Coupled with a front facing function button, photographers will also be able use the ring to set functions such as ISO sensitivity, film simulation, white balance and continuous shooting can.

The Fujifilm X30 is not a completely new X20 that we were hoping for. But with these new ergonomics and screens should be enough of a reinvention to make the X30 shine on its own even in the shadow of the X100s. The Fujifilm X30 will be available in late September for $599.95 and until then check past the break for more specs and images.

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Fujifilm GF670

Medium format rangefinder cameras are expensive–and that may also be the reason for their declining sales figures over the years combined with the digital monster enveloping the film world. But the latest casualty of this the Fujifilm GF670 rangefinder medium format camera. Our sources within Fujifilm America contacted us today to tell us the sad news.

The camera was a medium format rangefinder with a unique folding lens that came in and out of the camera to make it more compact. It shot 120 film in the 6×7 format (highly regarded by many photographers) and sported an 80mm f3.5 lens which gave a semi-wide to normal field of view.

For what it’s worth, the company has been focusing much more heavily on their X series cameras due to the retro-styling that has been giving them so much success coupled with some fantastic image quality. But for what it’s worth, it’s quite sad to know that many digital folks won’t know the sheer image quality that the GF670 could deliver when coupled with Velvia or Portra.

The most recent blogger to give it any love was Steve Huff. But otherwise, the camera has some die hard Flickr users that love it in their very own group. Keep in mind though that this notice seems true of the GF670, and not the newer GF670W.

Good night sweet prince.

Fujifilm hybrid af pixes

In a similar move to what Canon has done with Hybrid AF on their 70D sensors, Fujifilm has put in a patent for Hybrid AF pixels according to Fuji Rumors. Essentially, what it’s doing is embedding special pixels that offer both phase detection and light gathering abilities onto the sensor to work in conjunction with the contrast detection focusing while also not jeopardizing image quality. Of course, the light transmission won’t be at 100% according to the patent due to the pixels functioning to do two jobs.

On other systems, the sensors have pixels just for phase detection–at least that’s what Egami is hinting at. Of course, when this hits the market we only expect it to do a marginally better job in its first iteration. In future iterations, it will most likely become much better as algorithms improve.

Indeed, when this does finally come to the consumer market, it will be awesome for street photographers, wedding photographers and event shooters. And it’ll be very exciting to see what happens when this comes out.

 

NIkon Df GServo-20131231-0016

The internet is abuzz with professional photographers and enthusiasts who are dumping their DSLR to switch to mirrorless cameras such as the Fujifilm XT-1 or Sony A7s. The high performance and image quality provided by these small, compact cameras are convincing many photographers to switch not only models, but brands.

There are no shortage of articles that showcase that advantages of mirrorless over a DSLR and visa versa, but such comparisons alone are usually not enough to convince someone to make the change. The reality is that many photographers may not need to regardless of either the hype or the definitive advantages provided by mirrorless. Here are some reasons why you may want to stick with your DSLR.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fuji X Pro 1 hands on photos (1 of 14)

After much speculation on what lenses Fujifilm could possibly come out with next, the Japanese camera company has updated its road map of glass coming next year. According to the new chart we will see a XF 50-140mm f2.8 lens arriving sometime before towards the end of 2014.

Previously we’ve reviewed the XF 55-200mm f3.5-4.8 R LM OIS, Fujifilm’s first telephoto zoom lens that delivered excellent image quality. Our only gripe with the lens was we would have loved to see a constant aperture and now this new telephoto lens will add just that along with weather sealing to complement the X-T1.

Soon after in early 2015, Fujifilm will finally introduce the long awaited 16-55mm f2.8 R WR lens after first announcing it with the X-T1. As a direct upgrade to the already amazing 18-55mm f2.8-4 kit lens, this new all-around zoom lens will add a slightly wider-focal length and constant f2.8 aperture, plus weather-sealing.

Head past the break to see what else Fujifilm has in store for next year.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Low Contrast Black and White Tutorial NEOPAN (1 of 2)ISO 4001-8000 sec

There are loads of films out there that have a beautiful and iconic look to them that die hards will say that you can’t capture at all. But even though this may be true for color film, when it comes ot black and white film it’s a lot simpler. Through lots of careful observations and experimentations, we believe that we’ve figured out the way to make your images look a lot like Fujifilm NEOPAN, or at least come close to it.

Fujifilm Neopan was a black and white low contrast film that was loved by many photographers out there for its graininess and its ability to be so versatile in the darkroom due to the low contrast nature of it. Essentially, what this meant is that it was incredibly forgiving.

But to get that look in Adobe Lightroom, you’ll need to do a little bit of work. However, it’s really quick and really simple.

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