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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2 review product images (7 of 7)ISO 2001-500 sec at f - 1.7

Behold: the Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2. Yes, an f1.2 autofocusing lens is here for the Micro Four Thirds system. Customers have ben dreaming about a lens like this for many years and as the system has grown up, so too have its optics offerings.

We’re very much inclined to say that this portrait lens is something that you’ll never want to let go of. In collaboration with Leica, Panasonic has created something that is sharp, delivers great colors with skin tones, and isn’t too heavy.

And if anything is holding you back, it will really only be the price.

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Review: Nikon D810

by Chris Gampat on 08/17/2014

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

The Nikon D810 is the latest flagship DSLR from Nikon without a vertical grip attached. Coming in two years after the D800 and D800E; it is seen as the replacement for both cameras. For the most part, Nikon has given users some very minor upgrades in the same way that Canon didn’t offer too much change from the 5D Mk II to the Mk III. Most notably with the D810 is the modest bump in megapixels with no AA filter, the D4s’ autofocusing system, better high ISO output, and something that Nikon users have been asking for for a very long time: small RAW mode. Indeed, with this camera it is now possible to not fill up your computer’s hard drive after a single professional shooting session.

The Nikon D810 is a heck of a lot of camera that we don’t think that everyone needs at all. And those that would make the best use of it are those that make a living from selling their images. But for many of those people, the upgrade may not be enough.

For others: the Nikon D810 may be the camera that makes you drop your current system and switch over immediately.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic GH4 product lead photo (1 of 1)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 4.0

The Panasonic GH4 is a camera that, when announced, was for the most part an incremental upgrade from the GH3–on paper at least. However, the GH3 was also quite a good camera. But if you loved the GH3, then you’ll be amazed by what the GH4 can do. It focuses faster, has better image quality and feels great in the hand. However, this is all really to a certain point.

At its heart, the GH4 houses a 16.05MP Four Thirds sensor, has magnesium alloy construction, 49 autofocus points, 4K video recording, a 3 inch 1,035K dot LCD screen, and a 2,359K-Dot OLED Live View Finder. But is that enough to make you leave your current camera?

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 first impressions product images (8 of 8)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 3.2

When Nikon announced the D810, we were intrigued to see what they would do to improve the already great camera. For starters, they threw out the AA filter, bumped the megapixel count to 36.3, added the new EXPEED 4 processor, incorporated the D4s’ Multi-Cam 3500-FX AF sensor offering up 15 cross-type and 51 overall focusing points in total as well as the ability to shoot at up to 5fps. But beyond this, they gave the camera a small RAW mode, a 3.2-inch 1229K-dot LCD and expanded the camera’s ISO range to a D4s-esque 64 to 12,800 that’s also expandable to 32 and 51,200. The Nikon D810 can shoot movies in Full-HD 1080p all the way to 60fps. 

So when we first got our review unit from Adorama, we were interested to see if it’s worth the upgrade for many D800 owners.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 20mm f1.7 II product images first impressions (4 of 5)ISO 4001-500 sec at f - 3.5

Panasonic’s 20mm f1.7 was a lens that created legends and made jaws drop everywhere. Released around the initial start of the Micro Four Thirds launches, the lens was a sharp pancake offering that also had a wide aperture and image quality overall to boot. Fast forward a couple of years and the lens is on its second iteration. DxOMark has stated that this lens isn’t as sharp as its predecessor, but we all know that a little bit of post-production work can fix that.

We’ve been spending some quality time getting to know the lens, and so far we’re pretty impressed by what we see. But of course, it isn’t all sugar and sweets. And at $427.99, it may be a bit too much to stomach.

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Review: Sony A7s

by Chris Gampat on 07/25/2014

Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony A7s product images (1 of 8)ISO 16001-50 sec at f - 4.0

The Sony A7s has to be the single camera that will shift the megapixels race to the ISO stage. When it was first announced, it was billed as a low megapixel high ISO territory trailblazing camera. Then tests started to come out that confirmed this. Indeed, Sony’s 12MP full frame sensor is quite capable not only of delivering very clean high ISO results, but also pretty darned good RAW file versatility. But there is so much more to the camera than this.

The A7s also is one of the fastest focusing cameras that we’ve tested on the site–and for that reason its reliability as a tool in your daily life increases. The camera is a dream come true for many photojournalists, concert photographers, and videographers.

On the other hand, still photographers are bound to be disappointed somewhat by fewer megapixels and the lack of detail at lower ISOs.

But Sony delivered some Editor’s Choice award winning products in the A7 and A7r. Is the A7s worthy of the award too?

Editor’s Note: this review is based solely on a photographer’s point of view. We will post another article later on comparing this camera’s video output to the Panasonic GH4.

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