Vintage Film Camera Review: Pentacon Six TL (6×6 Square Format)

There are only a few cameras that have been coined “an SLR on steroids” in the medium format camera world, and one of those is the Pentacon Six TL. The Pentacon Six TL is a medium format SLR camera similar in style to its more famous rival the Pentax 67. It doesn’t use interchangeable backs but instead opts for one of the quirkiest ways of loading a camera perhaps ever. Shooting square format 6×6 images, it’s also prone to problems like frame overlap unless you’re careful. Though if you can work with its quirks, you’ll have yourself a solid SLR camera that is reliable otherwise.

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Review: Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Milvus (Canon EF)

The Milvus lineup of lenses from Zeiss are more or less their workhorses; and with the addition of the new Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Milvus lens, I’ve never been more convinced that they’re the absolute best lens maker on the market. Yes, Sigma–that mean even above what you’re capable of. While Zeiss’s mentality has always been about MTF charts and curves, in the past few years they’ve been working on a transition that’s catering not only to that crowd, but also to those who care more about the stuff that can’t be measured in a lab. For example, Zeiss lenses have always had a special character about them–I’ve seen folks on our Facebook page talk about it fairly often when their optics come up.

So what’s even more appealing about the Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Milvus lens is that they’re targeting at portrait photographers.

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Which One?: Canon 6D Mk II vs Canon 6D Original Comparison

Be sure to check out our Canon 6D Mk II first impressions.

When you ask the question of Canon 6D Mk II vs Canon 6D there are bound to be a lot of other questions that come up. With today’s announcement of the new Canon 6D Mk II, lots of photographers are wondering whether or not they should upgrade. I personally own the Canon 6D original; and it’s been one of my favorite Canon DSLRs for many years now. Some of the biggest updates to the line include a vari-angle LCD screen and a new 26MP full frame sensor. But there are a number of other differences too.

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First Impressions: Canon 6D Mk II

Yup, the Canon 6D Mk II is real–and I had the chance to play with it a while back. The new camera is an interesting upgrade that is bound to be a hit with Canon die hard fanatics and those who love DSLRs. But those of us who have moved onto mirrorless cameras or have been considering them may be just a bit disappointed. In many ways, the Canon 6D Mk II feels like the Canon 5D Mk III. The original Canon 6D, which I own, feels like a true update to the Canon 5D Mk II–and so this evolution only makes sense. Like the original before it, the Canon 6D Mk II isn’t really designed to be a workhorse camera the way that the 5D series have always been. However, there are a lot of features that will surely make it an appropriate secondary camera.

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Review: Canon 77D

The logic behind the Canon 77D is one that in some ways doesn’t really make sense to me. But if Canon believes that it will get them sales, then so be it. However, with at least three Rebels, two mid tier, and one high end tier APS-C camera there’s a lot of head scratching to do. I mean, why not do something similar between the 5D series and the 1D series? Or between the Canon 5D and 6D? Either way there are surely a number of really interesting things about the Canon 77D such as the 24MP APS-C sensor, the interestingly pleasant ergonomic controls, the autofocus that almost never missed a shot, and Canon’s incredibly simple and straight forward menu interface that I wish everyone else would get half as right.

Though to be fair, it shouldn’t be this expensive.

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Review: Fujifilm 50mm f2 R WR (Fujifilm X Mount)

The Fujifilm 50mm f2 R WR is the third lens addition to the f2 weather sealed compact prime offerings from Fujifilm–and in many ways it’s an excellent portrait lens. But it’s also great for much more than that. You see, Fujifilm developed the Fujifilm 50mm f2 R WR lens to be pretty versatile. It can focus fairly close and it has weather sealing built into the design. Combine this with naturally sharp optics, fast autofocus performance, and the not too large size and you’ve got yourself a pretty powerful, compact longer focal length.

Most photographers picking this lens up may opt for shooting portraits. In all honesty, there are better options for portraiture in the Fujifilm X series system, and also a few fantastic third party options. But if you’re the type of photographer who shoots candids on the streets and like to do street portraits, you may want to give this lens a try. Yes, the street photographer and the street portrait photographer are the ones who will want to go for this lens.

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Review: Canon EOS M6 (Canon EF-M Mount)

If you were to look at the mirrorless camera world, it would appear that Canon, with the Canon M6, is an entry into the world where they’re still trying to find themselves. To some, they could look like an experimental 20 something trying in vain to get their life together. Yet somehow or another, I genuinely never thought that I’d like the Canon M6. The camera isn’t designed to be the highest end mirrorless camera from Canon, yet somehow or another it’s a camera that surely deserves respect in some ways and groans of frustration at the fact that Canon has gotten this camera almost perfectly right yet it feels like they were purposely holding themselves back. The Canon M6 has at its heart a 24MP APS-C sensor which is smaller than all the other options out there from Fujifilm, Sony, Pentax, Sigma–and let’s be honest because they’re all more or less made by Sony. Designed for the enthusiast, the Canon M6 has some very tough competition from the entire camera world. Yet somehow or another, this truly is a camera that you need to personally experience to understand.

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Which One?: Sigma 85mm f1.4 Art vs Sigma 135mm f1.8 Art Comparison

If you’re a portrait photographer, the question of Sigma 85mm f1.4 Art vs Sigma 135mm f1.8 Art has most likely come up. The two lenses are portrait photography powerhouses designed to be some of the best lenses in the world and have attractive characters to portrait photographers of all types. Typically, choosing one lens over the other has had to do with the amount of space that you’re working in, but with trends in modern photography that can change pretty easily just by switching locations. Both lenses have different image quality characteristics and different body characteristics. So which one is right for you?

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