Review (In Progress): Sony 70-200mm f2.8 OSS G Master (Full Frame E Mount)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 70-200mm f2.8 G Master lens product images review (1 of 13)ISO 4001-80 sec at f - 2.8

When you consider a camera system, one of the most important lenses to look out for is a 70-200mm equivalent–and Sony has been working on delivering that in the form of the Sony 70-200mm f2.8 OSS G Master lens for full frame E mount cameras. With weather sealing, a white body, 18 groups with 23 lens elements, and a constant f2.8 aperture throughout the zoom range coupled with a small size overall–there is a lot of love about this lens.

Editor’s Note: In conjunction with the changes we’ve been doing here on the site, we’re once again changing our review format. First impressions reviews will be completely replaced with a fuller and fuller review that will be updated overtime. Readers will be given notifications on when the full review is complete. Each section will also be rated with stars and an overall cumulative rating. Additionally, comparisons will be made. If parts seem incomplete it’s because they’re still being worked on

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Review: Fujifilm X-T2

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm X-T2 review initial product images (5 of 12)ISO 2001-550 sec at f - 2.8

Editor’s Note: In conjunction with the changes we’ve been doing here on the site, we’re once again changing our review format. First impressions reviews will be completely replaced with a fuller and fuller review that will be updated overtime. Readers will be given notifications on when the full review is complete. Each section will also be rated with stars and an overall cumulative rating. Additionally, comparisons will be made. If parts seem incomplete it’s because they’re still being worked on.

“Should someone really upgrade?” is a conversation that I had with a colleague of mine about the Fujifilm X-T2 after getting a chance to look at it for a little while. On paper, the camera seems to have a number of significant advantages over the X Pro 2 such as the addition of 4K video and a heat sink that can do this. Plus there are more autofocus points. Of course, both the X Pro 2 and the X-T2 are better than the X-T1.

When you look at the Fujifilm X-T2 what you see is a camera that essentially looks and functions the same as its predecessor. A few things are beefier like the SD card door for example. The camera’s finish also lends itself to a more solid feel. But otherwise the camera will feel very much at home in the hands of an experienced Fujifilm camera user. However, there isn’t much of a reason for a hobbyist to upgrade–at least from our initial thoughts.

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First Impressions: Hasselblad X1D

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Hasselblad X1D product images (13 of 13)ISO 6401-50 sec at f - 2.8

Editor’s note: With this post, we’re testing a new offering from our current redesign: full screen blog posts. Please let us know your feedback as we’re eager to keep building a better Phoblographer for you all.

If you think about any of the companies who have contributed much to the world of photography gear, there shouldn’t be a doubt in your mind that Hasselblad is on that list. With the company’s new X1D announced earlier today, I’ve got no doubt in my mind that they’ve reached out and touched the millennial generation of photographers in the digital world in the same way that the 500C has touched them.

The Hasselblad X1D features a 50MP cropped 645 format sensor–that is to say that it isn’t a full frame 645 sensor but instead still larger than a 35mm sensor. The camera also incorporates the use of leaf shutter lenses that let you shoot with a flash to 1/2000th with full sync, autofocus, an EVF, a touchscreen LCD, and interesting features such as a mode dial that locks and unlocks by simply pressing it up and down.

But even more amazing: it’s pretty small–honestly if you could imagine a Sony a6000 series camera, put a big sensor in it and make it around the height of some DSLRs then reduce the weight and depth significantly, you’ve got this camera.

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Review: Mint Camera InstantFlex TL70 2.0

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Mint Camera InstantFlex TL70 product images (4 of 16)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 4.5

Personally speaking, film camera reviews like those of the Mint Camera InstantFlex TL70 are the most fun for great reasons–there is no pixel peeping, no RAW file versatility, none of that stuff that people bitch and complain about in forums. Instead, it’s all about the moment and capturing or creating it. Then there are the lenses, the experience, and knowing that the photo you shoot is a one of a kind.

The Mint Camera InstantFlex TL70 2.0 camera’s biggest upgrade is its brighter viewfinder over the predecessor. This is a proper TLR (Twin Lens Reflex) camera with aperture priority control, exposure compensation, manual focusing, a flash, accessories, and an overall solid build quality. Most importantly for many of us, there are glass elements in the lens. Considering that Instax Mini basically covers a 645 area, this is important.

This can be a tough camera for many of us to learn; but at the same time you’re bound to have fun doing it.

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Review: Canon 80D

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 80D product photos (2 of 15)ISO 1001-80 sec

While the name can often confused when verbally addressed, the Canon 80D is a camera targeted highly at the semi-professional market of photographers. It’s a step above their Rebel DSLRs but below the 7D Mk II flagship camera in the APS-C realm. However, it has features that lots of the lower end crowd may really like.

To be very honest, there are lots of things about the 80D that make it my favorite that Canon has put out in a while. But on the other hand, there are things about it that make me wonder what the heck they were thinking.

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Review: Tamron 90mm f2.8 Di VC USD (Canon EF)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Tamron 90mm f2.8 Di VC USD review product photos (7 of 7)ISO 8001-50 sec at f - 4.0

Tamron knocked the ball out of the park with their 85mm f1.4 Di VC USD lens–and so updating the 90mm f2.8 Di VC USD, one of their more popular options just made sense. This lens is very much a jack of many trades. It’s designed to shoot macro images, have image stabilization, great image quality, and also has weather sealing. For many years it was in the hands of enthusiasts and hobbyists, but the 90mm is worthy of being in the hands of many professionals.

This one, like many of the company’s new lenses, offer a metal exterior, weather sealing, 9 aperture blades, 14 elements in 11 groups and 4.5 stops of vibration compensation. For the $649 price point you’re getting quite a bargain..

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Review: Sigma 30mm f1.4 DC DN Contemporary (Sony E)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 30mm f1.4 DC mirrorless product images (1 of 6)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

Sigma has been putting out loads of awesome lenses over the past years–even their Contemporary glass seems to be right up there with their Art and Sports lenses. So when the company announced their 30mm f1.4 DC DN, I was really curious as to why it wasn’t under the Art series.

With an f1.4 aperture, nine aperture blades and fast focusing motors inside, it surely seems like it would be. But maybe Sigma is making their contemporary lenses render a bit less saturation vs the Art series–at least that’s what the 30mm makes me believe.

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Long Term Comparison: Fujifilm or Sony- Which is Right For You?

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony vs Fujifilm comparison (1 of 1)ISO 4001-160 sec at f - 4.0

It’s a question that’s been posed many times in the website’s search engine: Should I go with Fujifilm or Sony? Both camera systems have become more and more serious as they’ve matured over the years. The camera systems are both highly capable and used by many top photographers for a variety of work. Both cameras will create great images but they have their own unique advantages.

As a long time owner of both Fujifilm and Sony cameras and a reviewer of their systems, this post will help you figure out a lot more about what system you should go with.

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