Review: Leica M10

The Leica M10 has to be one of the worst kept secrets from Leica in a while. Perhaps it’s because it generated a whole lot of excitement, and indeed it’s worth the hype. For the purist photographer, this is bound to be a tool that they’ll closely look at. With a 24MP CMOS full frame sensor, this camera is the company’s smallest M digital camera and this was done by creating a camera that more or less is super densely packed. It’s around the same size as the company’s film M cameras.

We’ve been playing with the Leica M10 for a while now, and in truth, we really like it.

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Vintage Camera Review: Mamiya RB67 Pro-S (6×7 Format)

A few years ago, I was told that a Hasselblad digital camera was going to kill the 120 format of film. At the time, I was absolutely astounded. For many years, I believed it to a certain point. 645 digital is good; in fact, it’s very good. But very few pieces of work out there have really delivered to me what I feel is that true medium format look. It’s what so many photographers strive for. But if you’re working with a camera like the Mamiya RB67 Pro-S, it’s impossible to not get that look you’re craving. A true workhorse camera for a portrait or landscape photographer, this camera has been in my arsenal for a fair amount of time now and I’ve often considered it to be my crown jewel.

If anything, it’s proven that 645 digital is close to the larger formats of 120 film, but it still isn’t totally there to me.

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Review: Sony a6500

Three refreshes: that’s how long it took for Sony to create a camera with a sensor that can keep up with its competitors. Granted, the processing engine in the Sony a6500 is very capable and a big part of it. But then we also beg the question: Why so many refreshes so suddenly?

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Review: Sony a99 II

In some ways, it perplexes me that Sony still has the a99 and Alpha series of cameras. Sure, they’re from the Minolta days and have a heritage behind them, but admittedly the company doesn’t push them anywhere as hard as they do their E mount lineup. I wish they did though–Minolta was at one time one of the most important camera companies in the world. So if you look at the Sony a99 II and trace its evolution, you honestly won’t see a whole lot of that heritage sans the mount. But this could arguably also be said for the original a99 with the new hot shoe. In all honesty though, that choice was for the better.

The Sony a99 II is a camera packed to the brim with technology. If you’re not convinced by the high megapixel full frame sensor, then you’ll be shocked to know it’s also capable of shooting sports and fast motion very well with its highly improved autofocus system. Indeed, this is the best that Sony can deliver.

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Review: Sony RX100 V

For a really long time, I’ve never truly been a fan of the Sony RX100 series of cameras, but then earlier this year Sony launched their Sony RX100 V–and somehow or another things changed. The company has been making steady improvements to the camera over the years with a better aperture value through the zoom range, the addition of an EVF, improved battery life, improved autofocus, better video, and better image quality. At the same time, I’ve become more and more enamored with point and shoots. The good ones with a fixed lens, a fast aperture, fast autofocus, small size, and solid image quality just make it all that much more worth investing into one.

In my personal collection, my Hexar AF has taken the place of SLRs and others just because it’s so small, lightweight, quiet, and has fantastic image quality. Digital point and shoots have been there for a while now, but nothing has impressed quite like what the Sony RX100 V has been capable of in terms of image quality from a 1 inch sensor.

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Review: Canon 5D Mk IV

This review of the Canon 5D Mk IV has been really, really delayed. I’ve had chances to play with it, but I don’t feel that it was enough to truly give a formalized evaluation. For that reason, I tend to want to spend more time with products than other reviewers. Something is always bound to go wrong or you’re bound to discover something that doesn’t make sense at all. With the Canon 5D Mk IV, a whole lot made sense. The camera won’t do what its predecessor did for the industry years ago, but at this point it’s a workhorse camera that truly can’t be changed much. Working photographers everywhere would have a minor freakout if there was a massive change, right?

Honestly, I doubt it.

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Review: Pentax K-1

The Pentax K-1 is a camera that is great in many ways. It offers features that Canon, Nikon and Sony just don’t in a full frame DSLR while also keeping the price point fairly modest. Pentax’s strategy for years was always to take professional grade features and bring them down to the consumer and enthusiast. For the most part, the Pentax K-1 does that. With cool things like Astrotracer, WiFi, Composition adjustment, and arguably the weirdest LCD screen in the industry, the K-1 is a camera that will suit the needs of most professional photographers when paired with the right lenses.

Sure, Pentax may not have the more extended dedicated flash and lens support that Canon, Nikon and Sony do (especially in TTL monolights)–but that doesn’t mean that it still can’t be a very capable camera in the hands of an experienced photographer.

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Review: Pentax 15-30mm f2.8 ED SDM WR (Pentax F)

The Pentax K-1 is probably the greatest thing to happen to many Pentax users in a while; and when you consider some fantastic lenses like the company’s Pentax 15-30mm f2.8 you start to see more and more how someone could almost want to switch systems. The Pentax 15-30mm f2.8 is a weather sealed beast of a lens that works very well with the Pentax K-1 and is designed for landscape, architecture, and Real Estate photographers. But it’s also a generally great walkaround lens if you’re the type that enjoys shooting wide. Like all wides, it can also be used to deliver a very unique perspective when shooting portraits.

With 9 aperture blades in its design and HD coatings to render even more details, there’s a lot to love here.

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