First Impressions: Sony a9 (Flagship Camera)

The new Sony a9 is finally here; and it seems to be absolutely fantastic from a technology standpoint in many ways. To start with, it has a new stacked 24MP CMOS sensor and can shoot up to 20fps with a completely silent shutter. This camera is strongly being targeted at the photojournalist type of photographer–quite obviously the pros considering that it’s a $4,000+ camera. It’s being released next month and today we got some time to play with the camera a bit.

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Review: Tamron AF 180mm f3.5 Di SP A/M FEC LD (IF) 1:1 Macro (Canon EF)

Before the company started to really revamp their lenses, Tamron’s offerings were actually pretty darn good to start. So on a whim of curiousity, I decided to try the Tamron AF 180mm f3.5 Di SP A/M FEC LD (IF) 1:1 Macro–surely a long telephoto macro lens will have to be great, right? Truthfully, it really is; but it isn’t without its own faults partially due to how DSLR cameras work. Though for the enthusiast photographer, you’ll probably really appreciate what it’s capable of.

And at the same time, you’ll need to shoot it like a pro.

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Review: Fujifilm GFX 50S Mirrorless Medium Format Digital Camera

For years and years, a lot of us have been drooling over the idea of mirrorless medium format digital cameras, and the Fujifilm GFX 50S is one of the first offerings to make it onto the scene. Fujifilm opted to take the same route that Leica, Pentax and Hasselblad have done with a sensor built into a body vs the more traditional SLR styles of Phase One and some of Hasselblad’s lineup. The Fujifilm GFX 50s (price) you’d think would be targeted at the photographer who needs that kind of resolution, but instead it’s aimed at the photographer who typically uses a Canon 1Dx Mk II or Nikon D5 type of camera. Essentially, the highest end of the highest end. Weddings? Yup, this is for that. Sports? Well, that’s where Fujifilm starts to hit a wall.

However, the camera is an alternative option: opting instead for better resolution and a larger sensor in the same way that wedding photographers years ago reached for 645 medium format film cameras.

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Review: Ricoh GR II (One of the Best Compact Cameras We’ve Ever Tested)

The Ricoh GR II is and has been a hit with many photographers for a long time now. Based in part off of the classic Ricoh GR point and shoot film cameras that have forever been popular with street photographers, the Ricoh GR II brings modern updates to the previous camera. In many ways, this camera seems to simply ooze with quality. Much of it is an aesthetics based allure you won’t see with many other point and shoots out there. More than any others, this camera truly feels like a photographer’s compact and holds its own very well with the likes of the Sony RX1R II, Fujifilm X100F and the Leica Q.

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Which One? 85mm Lenses for the Full Frame Sony E Mount Compared

If you take a look at all the 85mm lenses available for the Sony full frame E mount, you’ll notice that there surely are a whole lot. Both Zeiss and Sony make some of the most popular offerings, and sorting through the lot of them can be exhausting. Thankfully though, we’ve reviewed all of them and sorted through our information to figure out which one may be best for you.

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Review: Sony 85mm f1.8 FE (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

If you were to ask me about what my favorite lenses are for the Sony full frame E mount camera system, the Sony 85mm f1.8 FE would surely be up there in the top 5. It’s compact, sharp, can focus quickly (emphasis on can), touts moisture and dust resistance, and overall delivers some of the most pleasing images I’ve gotten in a while. You see, I really LOVE 85mm lenses. They let me work closer to a subject while also being fairly intimate with them in a portrait setting. But then you consider just how great the image quality is with this lens, the fast aperture, and the small size and you’ve got yourself something really quite magical.

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Vintage Camera Review: Leica CL (Leitz Minolta CL, Minolta CLE)

Years ago, I owned a Leica CL when I was getting into photography. Trying to balance an understanding of both film and digital, I toted this around with my old school Olympus E-510 DSLR. They were perfect together for a college student. But then I needed money, and unfortunately had to sell my Leica. Very recently though, I took the plunge before my 30th birthday and bought myself another one. You see, the Leica CL is the same camera as the Minolta CLE and the Leitz Minolta CL.

Some consider it not a true Leica because it wasn’t made in Germany. Instead, the Leica CL was a collaboration between Minolta and Leica. It was a camera that sold very well and perhaps too well. In fact, it’s rumored that sales were so good that they discontinued the camera because it ate into the sales of the Leica M5.

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Vintage Camera Review: Fujifilm GW690 III (6×9 Medium Format)

When Fujifilm announced their medium format digital camera, a whole lot of people really wanted it to be something along the lines of the Fujifilm GW690 III camera–also known as the Texas Leica. This rangefinder camera shoots in the 6×9 format–which is one of the largest formats to use 120 film. For many years it was used by hobbyists, travel photographers, landscape photographers, and even a few portrait shooters. Due to its 90mm lens equivalent, you’re getting around a 38mm f1.2 equivalent when it comes to field of view converted to full frame.

When I purchasef this camera, I genuinely thought it would be the perfect medium format rangefinder for me, doing pretty much everything the Mamiya 7 II is capable of sans interchangeable lenses. But with more experience, I learned that I was wrong.

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