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dynamic range

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A7r review photos brooklyn bridge reddit walk (8 of 14)ISO 1001-60 sec at f - 4.5

We’ve talked before about getting better sharpness and about getting better colors in your images, but now we’re tackling the subject of dynamic range. We’re going to start off by saying that not every single image needs to be an HDR (High Dynamic Range) image in order for you to want to get better dynamic range. Sometimes it really just depends on what you want to accomplish creatively. But you should also know that this has everything to do with knowing how to meter with your camera to begin with.

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Could the Samsung NX1 look anything like this?

Could the Samsung NX1 look anything like this?

A recent report indicates that Samsung may be working on a high-end model to complement its line of NX-series mirrorless cameras. The new camera, which could be called the NX1, will allegedly sport a much more substantial body reminiscent of the Mamiya 6 medium format rangefinder film camera of the olden days (or the Mamiya 7/7II pictured above, which looked just like it.) Apart from that, the NX1 will purportedly be equipped with loads of amazing features.

The electronic viewfinder of the NX1 is said to be the highest-resolving on the market according to the report, and it will feature some kind of new technology. Likewise, the sensor–which is, unfortunately, still APS-C and not full-frame, as many will have hoped–is said to sport 28 megapixels and to deliver outstanding performance especially at higher ISO settings. Autofocusing will allegedly be of a hybrid nature like that of the Sony A6000, yet with more AF points.

The reported release date of the camera is this fall, which means it’s possible that we’re actually going to see it at photokina. The body along will reportedly cost $1,300, and in kit with the 16-50mm lens (we assume it is going to be the f2-2.8 version) the NX1 will sell for $2,300. As always, take this information with a grain of salt, as there is currently no way of verifying it. We’d sure be excited to see a camera like this, though–although we would’ve been even more excited about a full-frame mirrorless camera from Samsung.

Via Mirrorless Rumors

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When Sony’s A77 was released, ti was very highly regarded by many photographers. So when Sony announced their A77 Mk II, the world knew that they had to find a way to outdo not only that camera but lots of the other flagship APS-C competition. DxOMark announced the results of their sensor lab tests today, and apparently it’s slightly worse than the Nikon D7100 and above the Pentax K3. From the results, it has the worst ISO performance of the three–which makes us believe that it is a very similar if not the same sensor in the new A6000 mirrorless camera (review here).

Nikon seems to be leading the pack though with only slightly worse color depth than the other two.

All three cameras have 1.5x crop APS-C sensors and of course this test only shows the sensor performance. The K3 and D7100 are both very hefty tanks of cameras. In fact, we ran the K3 under water and it survived.

For more, you can check out our Pentax K3 and Nikon D7100 reviews. We have only had first impressions with the A77 Mk II so far though, and when we’ve completed the review a four way comparison will be done.

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An image of trees in Olympic National Park which requires a lot of dynamic range.

This post originally appeared on photographer Bill Wadman’s blog on April 22, 2014, and is being syndicated at The Phoblographer with his permission. Photo taken by and used with permission from Bill Wadman.

I’ve been meaning to write this one for a while. In fact it’s been sitting as an empty draft for months, so it’s about time we get on with it. One of my pet peeves is people who act like they know everything when they don’t know what the hell they’re talking about. A few years ago I wrote one of my favorite blog posts ever called Image Properties (Or how most people talk out of their ass), to tackle one of the common areas of confusion.

Today, in an attempt to help out some more of you we’re going to talk about the difference between ‘dynamic range’ and ‘latitude’. Two terms that many people use interchangeably which are actually two different things.

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Canon M15P-CL

In what seems to be a first, Canon has announced an industrial camera sporting a 15 megapixel monochrome sensor and, most peculiar (well, at first sight at least) a Nikon F-mount. The camera is aimed at the manufacturing industry, where Canon reckons it’ll be used for quality control applications that the human eye isn’t sensitive enough for. To that end, the monochrome sensor provides low noise, high sensitivity, and great dynamic range to be able to capture the slightest imperfections in a product.

In their own words, Canon “entered the industrial camera market as a new business to capture these market trends,” which means they want a piece of the industrial camera market cake. And there’s the answer as to why they put a Nikon F-mount on the M15P-CL: in industrial applications, the F-mount is very prominent, and Canon would probably have a hard time selling their new camera would it mean that potential end-users had to buy new Canon EF lenses for it, instead of being able to use the F-mount lenses they already have.

Judging from the description, the sensor inside the M15P-CL is something that black-and-white enthusiasts would love to see in a Canon DSLR. As Leica demonstrated with the M Monochrom, a sensor that comes without a color filter is not only more sensitive to light, but can also capture much greater tonality, which is very important to serious black-and-white photographers. It is, however, highly unlikely that Canon will ever put this sensor in a consumer product, as the market for monochrome cameras is pretty small.

Via Canon Watch

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DxOMark has analyzed the sensor of the new Nikon D4s, and the results aren’t really surprising. Since the camera is more of an update to the D4 rather than a full-fledged successor, we didn’t really expect the D4s to outperform the D4 by any significant margin. And indeed, this is what DxOMark’s measurements confirm. While the D4s has slightly better overall performance at ISOs 3200 and up, the D4 performs just as well if not a slight notch better at lower ISOs when it comes to dynamic range, tonal range and color sensitivity. The same is true for the Nikon Df.

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