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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When the Phase One IQ250 was announced, it was expected to outdo every DSLR in terms of image quality out there because of the large CMOS sensor. But when you get to the medium format level, you’re only as good as the body and the lenses. The IQ250 can output great images; but it isn’t without its drawbacks.

Or at least that what we’re finding so far…

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 Kodak Hawkeye II DSLR NASA

Did you know that one of the first digital SLRs was actually used by NASA back in 1991? Neither did we. It was in fact the very first camera that qualifies to be called a DSLR. However, back then, that meant something entirely different from what it means now. In 1991, Kodak retrofitted a Nikon F3 SLR body (yes, one of those old-school cameras that ran on this ‘film’ stuff) with a digital back that contained a tiny CCD sensor. In order to get the image information out of the camera, you needed a separate processing and storage unit that you’d carry over your shoulder.

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Canon Rebel SL1 white edition

After the recent sensor debacle–as a reminder, two Canon cameras in a row scored poorly in DxOMark’s sensor tests–it appears that the brilliant marketing geniuses over at Canon World Headquarters decided that it was time for a new approach at winning new customers. Looking into the history books, they must’ve found a reference on Leica somewhere, more precisely on how Leica effectively re-launched one and the same camera over and over again for decades by making one special edition after the other.

Something like this must’ve happened for sure, as we have no other explanation for what Canon has just done: they launched a white edition EOS Rebel SL1 / EOS 100D + 18-55mm kit lens. Yes, both camera and lens are clad in exclusive Canon Polar White, which is just a little bit whiter than the white Nikon uses in their 1-series cameras. We’re joking of course. About the white, that is. Not about the white camera. That one’s real. And the lens.

If we’ve got you all excited now, better calm down and put that credit card back where it belongs: it appears the super special white Rebel SL1 will only be available on European markets. That’s too bad, because let’s face it, who wouldn’t fancy a white Rebel! Owning one of these would surely make you stand out from the crowd of DSLR users. That is, until some Japanese bloke comes along with his multi-colored Pentax

Via Canon Watch

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 70D product images for announcement (3 of 6)It’s been speculated that if the Canon 7D Mark II were to ever exist, it would probably use a dual pixel sensor very similar to the Canon 70D. Well lo and behold there’s a new Northlight Images (translated) early report that backs up the theory. Northlight Images has heard that manufacturing issues with the dual pixel design of the APS-C sensor in the 70D has delayed the launch of the 7D Mark II.

More after the jump.

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20131209_CFE_standing_up_0117

It’s been a while since Lensbaby announced anything new; but now it seems like they’re going for the extreme end of things–and by that we mean extremely wide. The company announced a brand new 5.8mm f3.5 fisheye lens for APS-C Canon and Nikon DSLRs. However, it can be used on full frame DSLRs too. In terms of design, the lens looks like an old Nikon optic. The 5.8mm f3.5 has a fully manual aperture ring, manual focus, and something totally different too! This lens isn’t compatible with the Optic Swap system–and that sort of makes sense. The Optic Swap system is supposed to allow users to swap optics on their camera and tilt-shift their lenses. But the benefits of tilt-shift is some glorious bokeh. Unfortunately, you can’t really get any bokeh with something this wide.

We’re in the process of calling one in for review, but in the meantime you can pick one up from Adorama for $299.95.

20111018_loRes_eos1dx_frontnolensThe Canon EOS 1D X and EOS 1D C are supposed to be Canon’s hardiest full-frame camera bodies, but it seems the cameras are having some difficulties with autofocusing in cold weather situations. An anonymous source explained to Canon Rumors that the camera’s AF system do not work in temperatures below 0°C (32°F). The AF system purportedly “does not autofocus”, “does not search in AF” or “does not focus in AF search” when exposed to extremely low temperatures.

The source explained the issue is caused by a mechanical defect that causes the sub mirror system to become misaligned. This in turn causes the light rays reflected by the sub mirror to miss the AF sensor, rendering it useless. The full technical explanation follows.

This phenomenon is due to the Locking Claw of the Sub Mirror (mirror for AF) going over the Locking Pin. The Sub Mirror’s angle becomes deviated and the light rays for AF does not fall on the AF sensors, causing the ‘does not autofocus’ phenomenon.

While most photographers won’t have to contend with subfreezing temperature, such as -20°C (-4°F), it’s a major issue for anyone shooting landscapes or capturing polar bears in the arctic. Canon has since corrected the issue for cameras manufactured after January 24, 2013. However, if you’re hanging onto an older camera, replacing the mirror box with a newer version labeled CY3-1661-010 or CY3-1687-010 can repair the malfunction.

Via Canon Rumors