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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A77 Mk II first impressions images (3 of 9)ISO 2001-60 sec at f - 2.2

Though this report seems a bit crazy to hear, Sony Alpha Rumors is stating that the company may kill off almost all of their DSLR lineup of cameras to push consumers more towards the mirrorless options and pros more towards both mirrorless and DSLR (or SLT in Sony terms.) Instead, only the top end of the cameras will survive: with those being the A77 and the A99 series. Hopefully, this will also help to fix the marketing with all of the cameras now being included in the Alpha series.

Ever since the company announced that both E and A mounts are in the Alpha series, many have been very confused.

If the A mount is to only continue with two cameras, what that may also mean is that the next A77 or A99 models may be positioned more towards a higher level enthusiast than the pro. They’re a company that has always gone after that market segment more than professionals–with the exception of the company’s first full frame camera: the A900.

There is also the chance that the report isn’t true at all because of all of the consumer oriented lenses that Sony has created over the years. It would be a total waste to abandon all of that production.

Canon See Impossible

Update: It’s a major let down.

It seems Canon has a big announcement coming tomorrow. Over the weekend Canon printed a teaser ad in the New York Times filled with cryptic text and bold statement that the camera company can “SEE IMPOSSIBLE.” The text posted in full past the break is all a bit nonsensical, however the ad also included a link pointing to a website with a countdown clock.

As of this writing, the countdown clock has whittled down to just over 24 hours, which means we will see what Canon has in store for us at 9am tomorrow. At Photokina the camera maker put on a rather flaccid show with the most exciting bits being the Canon 7D Mark II and Canon G7x. So perhaps this is the camera that could finally get us excited about Canon after so long.

There are plenty of theories as to what this camera could be. For instance the rumor mill has been churning about a high-megapixel DSLR to best the 36MP Nikon D810. Another theory is Canon could introduce some amazing new glass or even a mirrorless camera we’ll actually care about. The possibilities are nearly endless so let us know what you think Canon will announce in the comments below.

Via Canon Watch

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chris-gampat-the-phoblographer-yashica-electro-35-gsn-camera

When it comes to cameras there are two categories that many are split into: DLSRs and Mirrorless cameras. Rangefinders are a sub-division of mirrorless cameras that have been around for years and years. In fact, they’re older than SLR cameras and are largely unchanged in their basic design and functionality since their inception.

But with more cameras being more retro looking, how do you exactly tell the difference between the two?

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus product images review (2 of 7)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.0

DxOMark recently finished their evaluation of the Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus lens in the labs. And according to them, it’s the best performing 85mm lens that they’ve tested. Indeed, with a $4,490 price tag we would expect the same thing. According to them, the two Otus lenses perform just as well as the company’s 135mm f2 on Canon DSLRs. But when it comes to Nikon DSLRs, the 55mm Otus slightly edged out the 85mm. Additionally, it outperforms any other 85mm lens out there–which only makes sense given the high end audience that this lens was designed for.

The company’s finding reaffirm ours in our real world test of the Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus. We found the 55mm to be slightly sharper and also found the bokeh on the 135mm f2 to be better. Granted that’s a longer focal length.

Head on over to our full review of the Otus for more.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

At least every other day, we receive an email or message of some sort asking about what camera someone should purchase. In fact, I’ve been dealing with emails like this for years via the Phoblographer and during my time at B&H Photo. Usually, it’s from someone who knows nothing about photography. A former colleague of mine recently messaged me and said something along the lines of “Hey, the wife and I are thinking about buying a DSLR. I heard the D800 is good. What should I get?”

Granted, he and his wife know nothing about photography and when I tried to tell him that they don’t need a DSLR or anything as high level as a D800, he thought that I was completely insane. Then I offered alternatives from Fujifilm and Sony in the high end point and shoot world. He retorted with “Okay, just tell me this then: Canon or Nikon?”

Again, I told him that a DSLR is over his head, unless he really wants to learn how to use one to its potential. In truth, it’s also serious overkill.

“Why do you want a DSLR?” I said.

“Better pictures.” He said.

“Yes, but you’ll only get better pictures if you really want to dedicate yourself to learning how to use one. And with a kid on the way you won’t have the time.” I returned.

The point though is that not everyone needs a DSLR or a mirrorless camera. To be incredibly honest, most of the work that I do for the site or the paid photography gigs that I do doesn’t require super high end cameras. But to be fair, I have great lighting knowledge.

Still though, I seriously think that everyone needs to stop just reaching for DSLRs and mirrorless cameras and instead take a strong look at what the high end point and shoot market is offering. There are loads and loads of great options.

And of course, no one is making a bad camera.

 

K-S1_black_001

Leave it to Ricoh/Pentax to create one of the flashies DSLRs around–and we’re not talking about something strobists would particularly love. The company recently announced the new KS-1 DSLR that stands to be their entry level model. Before we even get to the major tech specs though, we think that it’s totally worth it to note the LED lights along the side of the camera and also bring your attention to the fact that the back has even more LEDs. It’s a pretty cool design concept, but we’re not sure that everyone would want the attention brought to their digicam.

Moving to what really matters, the camera houses a 20MP APS-C CMOS sensor capable of producing images at up to ISO 51,200. The camera also has in-body camera shake reduction on the sensor, an AA filter simulator, 100% viewfinder, 5.4fps shooting capabilities, 1/6000th shutter speed shooting, and a 3 inch 921K dot LCD screen on the back.

By modern day standards, the screen is a bit antiquated. However, with different colors and coming in at a price of $749.99 body only, you can’t complain very much.

More images are after the jump.

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