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Screenshot taken from the video

Screenshot taken from the video

Digital Rev recently compared the Canon 70D against the Nikon D7200 and Canon 7D Mk II. Why two Canon cameras? Because the Nikon D7200 is pretty much designed to take on both of them with the 7D Mk II targeting the higher end and the 70D going a bit lower end in some ways.

The hosts play a ridiculous game to test the autofocus system and mention specifics when it comes to the intricacies of the focusing system. It involves playing with the cameras FPS or paintball style where headshots count. This is a creative and fun way of doing it; and eventually it seems like the 7D Mk II and Nikon D7200 are the top contenders.

Check out who wins in the Canon 70D vs Nikon D7200 vs Canon 7D Mk II comparison after the jump.

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Screen Shot 2015-03-27 at 9.41.59 AM

For years, the Canon version was regarded as the best amongst the cheap lenses out there. Sometimes it was under $100 though most recently it’s around the $120 mark. The Yongnuo version is far under that at around $40.

In their test, Kai finds that the Yongnuo 50mm f1.8 is pretty darned good–though the focusing motor is probably one of the most annoying parts. They found the Canon 50mm f1.8 II to be faster to focus by a hair and they also found the Yongnuo to be worse than Canon’s. Oddly enough, others (like Tony Northrup) found them to be comparable.

The rest of the video as well as the results of their test are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM10 product photos (3 of 7)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.5

Sony and Olympus entered a gentleman’s agreement years ago to start collaborating in closer ways. With the latest announcement of the Sony A7 Mk II, it’s easy to believe that they have the same stabilization process. For many years now, Olympus has held the honor of having the best in-body image stabilization that we’ve seen. Indeed, whenever I need to shoot in impossibly low light, the camera that I reach for is my OMD EM5 paired with a Voigtlander 17.5mm f0.95 lens to shoot at very slow shutter speeds and with the lens wide open. Due to the depth of field and size of the sensor, shooting at f0.95 gives me the full frame equivalent of f2 in focus.

In a situation like that, technology like this could be very advantageous. But that isn’t a reason to discount what Sony is doing with its new 5 Axis Stabilization.

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The-Phoblographer-Infographic-on-Film-sizes

Inspired by Zack Arias’s video on film and digital sensor size comparisons, we decided to whip up a quick infographic for you on the different film sizes available in a friendly comparison. Think it’s cool to have a full frame 35mm sensor in your camera? Well consider the fact that you can get 645 (6×4.5) 6×7 film cameras for fairly cheap. Sure, you’ll have to pay for the film expenses, but you’ll also put more effort into you photos and have loads more keeper shots if you’re careful. Plus, you likely won’t upgrade your camera every couple of years.

As we show in the infographic above, 35mm film is smaller compared to everything else. In fact, 35mm film was originally invented to please consumers, not professionals. It was designed quite literally for novices but because the standard once people could deliver great work with it.

Sound familiar? It sounds a lot like the phone generation.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus product images review (3 of 7)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.0

All images by Mike Randolph of the Travel Photography Blog. Used with permission.

Sometimes we see some incredibly crazy comparisons between products. But the most crazy one that we’ve seen thus far has to be the most recent one by Mike Randolph. He dared to put the aging Sony RX100 against the brand new Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus mounted on the Sony A7r. Seems crazy, right? I mean, the the RX100 vs 85mm f1.4 Otus doesn’t really make sense.

For starters, the RX100 has a fixed zoom lens and a 1 inch sensor while the A7r has a full frame sensor with more megapixels and arguably the best 85mm lens attached to it. And the results? Well, they’d surprise you.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Rokinon Sigma 85mm f1.4 three way comparison (1 of 3)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 3.5

With Zeiss’s new 85mm f1.4 Otus reviewed, we took it upon ourselves to do an informal comparison of two of its biggest and closest competitors: the Rokinon 85mm f1.4 and the Sigma 85mm f1.4. Now granted, neither of these lenses are said to be targeted at the higher end photographer. But with Sigma’s offering being a couple of years old and Rokinon’s not being so old either, we decided that it would be great to see just how the three perform against one another.

Editor’s Note: Again we are saying that this is an informal comparison to see how the three stack up against one another. We’d like to remind our readers though that each offering is pretty darn solid, but if anything this is more of a measure of how the technology has progressed.

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