Quick Comparison Photo: Kodak Tri-X 400 vs Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400

I’ve been playing with more Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 film and shot a scene that I always photograph just to compare what this film and Kodak Tri-X do when rendering a specific scene. Kodak Tri-X has been around for a while and is heavily loved by many photographers out there. But, it’s expensive and many photographers have looked for alternative options out there. One of the newer black and white films to hit the market is Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 film.

So let’s take a quick look at Kodak Tri-X 400 vs Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400.

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Comparison: The Best Cheap 35mm Film Emulsions

While Kodak Portra, Fujifilm Velvia, and some of the others tend to steal the spotlight, there are a number of pretty good yet affordable color films on the market. George from Negative Feedback decided to put a number of them to the test in a video released earlier last year. All the images were taken on the Leica M7, MP, and M3, using a 50mm and 35mm summicron f2 with Kodak Colorplus 200, Agfa Vista 200, and Fuji Superia 400. The images were taken portrait style in a studio and using natural light.

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Which One? Sony a6500 vs Fujifilm X-T2 vs Fujifilm X Pro 2

If you’re a photographer that’s been looking at the high-end APS-C mirrorless camera options out there, then you most likely know that Sony and Fujifilm are the ones that continue to duke it out over and over again. The Sony a6500 is the company’s latest offering while Fujifilm has two flagship cameras in the form of the X-T2 and the X Pro 2. All of these cameras are highly capable, have the same megapixel count and have similar features. But which is the best?

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How Much Bigger is the Sensor in the Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Full Frame?

At Photokina 2016, the medium format Fujifilm GFX 50S camera was announced. It features a medium format sensor that is larger than full frame 35mm sensors, but isn’t larger than full frame 645 format sensors. To see just how large they all are in comparison, we put them all in a comparison chart together. In truth, it’s really not much larger; but it is indeed larger than full frame and effectively targets the photographers that want something more.

Review: Venus Optics Laowa 105mm f2 Smooth Trans Focus Lens (Sony E, Full Frame)

When you look at the landscape of portrait lenses available for the full frame Sony E mount, you’ll see that they’re growing at a high rate–and the Venus Optics Laowa 105mm f2 lens is only one of those options. This lens is very special due to the design incorporating an apodization element to produce images that the company claims will give you “smooth and creamy bokeh while maintaining excellent sharpness at the focal plane.” To that end, it loses some light gathering abilities and has a T rating of T3.2–meaning that the photographer loses more than a full stop of light.

In practice, you indeed do get incredible images. But as with every manual focus telephoto lens, you’ll need to be very careful.

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Review: Sony 50mm f1.8 (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

Sony’s 50mm f1.8 for the full frame E mount cameras is one of the lenses that photographers waited for for a while. When it was launched, it made everyone ecstatic. The system finally had its nifty 50 and would make loads of photographers very happy. As the first lens full frame 50mm lens designed for mirrorless cameras with autofocus, it’s bound to be exciting.

So how is it? If you’re a Sony user, you’ll probably want to get one.

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Review (Complete): Sony Zeiss 50mm f1.4 (Full Frame E Mount)

The release of the Sony Zeiss 50mm f1.4 for full frame E mount cameras begs the question “just how many 50mm lenses does one need?” In truth, just one–but the strategy is a smart one for the company. You see, years ago camera manufacturers used to offer loads of different lens options. You’d get a 50mm f1.8, f1.4, f2, etc. Leica still does this and to some degree, Zeiss does too. But with Sony, you’re getting something different.

This new lens isn’t part of the company’s G Master series of optics and instead it’s a lens that was created in collaboration with Zeiss. It boasts dust/moisture resistance, 11 aperture blades, and other cool features including Zeiss T* coatings that are bound to give you that Zeiss-like look though probably not as clear as their Milvus lineup of lenses.

Editor’s note: this review is now complete

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Review: Nikon D500

For years now, Nikon has said that the higher end lineup of the Dxxxx series of cameras were the replacement for the old D300s. But then they admitted that that wasn’t true, and like a rare find in the lands of Ancient Egypt, photographers got excited all over again with the announcement of the Nikon D500. Indeed, they have great reasons to.

The Nikon D500 is a camera that packs a punch–enough of one to fulfill the needs of both pros and high end enthusiasts. With a beefy build quality, fantastic autofocus, highly revamped ergonomics and a touchscreen on the back, there’s a whole lot that can be accomplished with this camera.

Editor’s Note: we’re trying a brand new review format. Each section will be individually evaluated and then added up for a tally. From there an evaluation will be given. Additionally, we will be making comparisons in each section.

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