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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Olympus 7-14mm f2.8 first impressions photos (10 of 19)

When it comes to landscape photography, it’s a known fact that you don’t need the most expensive lenses out there. Instead, much of it is about your focusing methods. Still, photographers want some sort of decent image quality and sharpness to the lenses. Luckily, you can get all of that without breaking the bank.

We’ve gone through our database of lens reviews, and rounded up a number of great lenses from amost every manufacturer that are affordable or great prices for what the lenses are.

Looking for a high quality but cheap costing lens for your next landscape photo series? Then hit the jump!

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 28mm f2 lens review product photos (1 of 7)ISO 4001-30 sec at f - 2.5

Sony has had a mirrorless camera system for a while. Originally called the NEX system, it has since been incorporated into the Alpha system. The company originally had only APS-C cameras, but they were the first to give the world full frame mirrorless cameras for the E-mount. However, the full-frame E-mount lenses are more expensive and much newer. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t find affordable options out there.

In our reviews of reviewing lenses, we’ve compiled lots of information from our Reviews Index and around rounding up our favorite E-mount lenses that won’t break the bank.

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Nikon Df GServo-20131231-0012

Yesterday, we featured five great cheap lenses for the Canon DSLR system; and today we’re taking a look at what Nikon has to offer. For years, photographers always said that you go to Canon for the lenses and you go to Nikon for the bodies. But in the most recent years, Nikon has been updating and putting out new lenses on a faster scale than Canon does. For starters, they’re determined to make loads of prime lenses at f1.8 and the company is also working on updating their other lenses that were otherwise left from the film days.

Over our years of testing lenses and cameras, we’ve rounded up some of the best and most affordable lenses that are available for the Nikon F mount DSLR system. So if you’re looking for the best cheap lenses for your Nikon DSLR, then look no further.

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Screen Shot 2015-04-03 at 10.15.44 AM

For better or worse, after lots of camera testing we believe that the best option when it comes to trying to get into medium format photography is to stick with film. You’ll get a beautiful look, the film is quite versatile, and the quality will make your jaw drop every time. Don’t know where to start? One camera that is often talked about is the Kiev 88: a Russian Hasselblad 1000F copy that is kind of quirky and like other medium format cameras varies from copy to copy.

The folks over at the Art of Photography recently shot a video profiling one of the cameras and states that there are pros and cons–a lot of cons. Third party modifications are available if you want, This 645 format camera is like many other medium format offerings that have interchangeable film backs, viewfinders, and lenses. But the overall quality control is all over the place.

Photographer Oleg Osprico does incredible work with one; and the video featuring the Kiev 88 is after the jump.

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Screenshot taken from the video

Screenshot taken from the video

Lighting doesn’t need to be expensive, and in fact it can sometimes be really simple to use. Aaron Nace from Phlearn recently demonstrated this in a video that they posted where they purchased a couple of fluorescent lights from Amazon for around $15 a piece and then use gels to change the way that the lights look.

Aaron states that they needed a three light setup–the same three light setup that most strobist portrait photographers talk about. In the scene there is a main light, fill light, and an accent light. The main light is providing the main source of light while on the other side you have the fill to add extra details to the shadows. But then a third light gets added called the accent light but traditionally known as the hair light. Aaron’s subject is a male, but this light is really important when photographing females.

While this works out really well, we should let you know that dollar for dollar, continuous lighting is significantly weaker than strobe lighting. However, it is easier to work with.

Aaron’s video is after the jump, and demonstrates a really thrifty way to use DIY lighting on the cheap. Be sure to also check out Aaron’s guest post for our Creating the Photograph series. Also be sure to check out this softbox hack also done for around $20.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Lomography Bel Air Hands on Review (2 of 10)ISO 400

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Check them out here.

The other night I was in a bar with a photographer that we featured here on the site recently. When we chatted, we talked about how the industry was going in general. She (the photographer) assists other larger names and does her own work on the side. For extra income, she thought about doing weddings with another photographer she is close with. The problem is that they didn’t want to deal with the editing process and everything else in the post-world that has to do with working with weddings. Additionally, everything that they found wasn’t worth the money and there are tons of low ballers out there. Essentially, that is also only one of the reasons why wedding photographers get paid what they do.

So after chatting with her and a couple of other photographers, we figured it out: just don’t post-process. If anything just shoot JPEG, cut the session down to the best images, and then hand them off to the clients. This goes for weddings, portraits, events, etc.

Again, we are not preaching laziness here–and if you take away from this article that we are doing that then you’ve obviously not read it. We’re preaching a way for photographers to make some extra cash on the side and still make the work profitable for them. If someone only wants to pay you $300 for a wedding and you’re giving them six hours of your time, just find ways to cut corners and make your time totally worth it and as profitable as you can.

On the other hand, if someone is paying you handsomely, put the according amount of work in and show that work off in your portfolio accordingly. Then always keep in mind that the high end photographers will never compete with the ones that only do cheap weddings because they are totally different price points. To the gear heads, it’s like comparing a Nikon D4s to a Canon Rebel.

Then in the end, just don’t tell anyone that you did it.