Why I Think We All Need to Stop Caring About DXOScores and Lab Tests

Before I get very deeply into this piece, this post isn’t a personal attack on DXOMark, DPReview, Imaging Resource, or any of the sites that do some sort of lab testing. They run a legitimate business that in some ways puts camera and lens testing into a format that is mathematically easier for lots of people to determine for themselves. But if you’re a photographer who has been working in this industry for a while and has developed a set of skills that allows you to create beautiful photos no matter what piece of gear you’re using, then it technically won’t matter if you’re using a Canon 5D Mk II or a Sony a9 as long as you can think creatively and capture or create a jaw dropping photo.

And with that statement I will begin my very pointed opinion.

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Could The Nikon D850 Have 8K Timelapse, Sony a7r II’s Sensor?

With last night’s announcement of the new Nikon D850, the only thing that we possibly know about it is that the camera will apparently have an 8k timelapse mode. But if history is going to repeat itself, we may see something that Nikon has done before–use Sony’s Sensors. The Nikon D850 is said to be a high resolution, high performance DSLR. And when I see that, I think about the Sony a99 II in some ways. Considering that Nikon has been using Sony sensors for a while now for many of their cameras, it would make sense that that’s what we’re going to see.

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P for Professional: What I Learned From Shooting in Program Auto

P for Professional: that’s the mantra that has been preached by photographer after photographer simply to make fun of the idea. It’s been taken so seriously that the Home Shopping Network has said it at times with complete seriousness. Though amongst the millions of us, we tend to know better. This saying is often connotated with the idea that a person shooting in P mode can’t shoot in manual mode. But looking at loads of photographers out there, a whole lot of them shoot in aperture priority or shutter priority which more or less also automates the process. The idea of shooting in P, or Program Auto, is blasphemy to so many photographers out there as a result of the photography industry’s years of marketing and ideals.

So at a certain point in time while reviewing the Canon 77D, I thought to myself that maybe I should give it a shot. In 11 years of shooting photos, I’ve honestly never used the P mode until very recently.

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The Basics: Choosing Your First Good Zoom Lens for Your Camera

In the past couple of years, photographers have finally been able to pick up their first good zoom lens. By that we mean lower end zoom lenses have become much better at delivering high quality photos. For years, photographers turned to higher end zooms and prime lenses for good quality optics. When you combine these new zoom lenses with high quality sensors though, you’re able to create photos that really stand out to you and others around you.

So we’re going to take a closer look at how you determine what your first zoom lens should be.

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How To Choose Your First Good Point and Shoot Camera

Point and Shoot cameras, once a staple of the middle-class family, has now largely been replaced with high-quality smartphone-based cameras. But there is still a good portion of the population who likes to have a standalone camera in their bag for when the smartphone doesn’t cut it, and those situations do exist. Smartphones aren’t nearly as versatile as a point and shoot camera with a zoom lens, nor do they offer the image quality or low light performance of a fixed prime lens compact point and shoot. But some of you may be asking yourselves how to choose your first good point and shoot camera? That is what we are here to answer for you today.

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The Basics: How to Choose Your First Mirrorless Camera

Mirrorless cameras are not the newfangled technology they used to be. Mirrorless systems from Sony, Fujifilm, Panasonic, and Olympus have had years to build solid systems with various camera and lens options that allow them to be capable of creating stunning images just as well as any DSLR. So you may be considering your first interchangeable lens camera, or maybe you have a DSLR and you are interested in taking advantage of some of the features that mirrorless brings to the table, whatever your reason is you may be asking yourself how to choose between the various options.

In this post, we hope to be able to help you figure out what questions to ask yourself when considering these various cameras and systems. Ideally, this will allow you to pick up a mirrorless camera in a system that will fit your wants and needs as a photographer so that you can take full advantage of it.

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Faraz Azhar’s Black and White Urban Geometry is a Solitary Study of Shapes

All images and text by Faraz Azhar. Used with permission.

My name is Faraz Azhar, I’m a travel photographer based in Dubai, UAE. Although I have a fulltime job as a banker, photography is my passion. I cherish black and white photography mostly for architectural photos. I believe that an architect spends endless hours imagining a structure that he is about to build, he draws countless shapes on paper before finalizing his design and he takes care of every little measurement and detail of that building; whether it’s a cornerstone or a pillar or any piece of metal or concrete. Capturing these fine details is an art. Taking photos of architecture in color makes it overwhelming and makes the viewer lose focus of what’s important in the scene…the fine architectural detail.

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Does It Even Matter? 8-bit vs 16-bit Color Depth in Photography

Color Bit Depth

If you have played around with your settings at all in Lightroom or other image processing software, you may have seen some options surrounding color bit depth. If you don’t know what that is, you may be wondering if it matters which you choose to process with – and that answer is yes, it does matter.

Put in the simplest terms possible, as you know, digital images are made up of three color channels: Red, Green, and Blue. All of the colors and tones in your image are made up of various gradations and mixtures of those three colors. The bit depth you choose to work with determines how many color gradations are available to each color.

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