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Canon_G1_X_II_DxO_comparison

DxOMark continues to rate the sensors in current camera models, and their latest victim was the Canon G1 X Mk II. The successor to the original G1 X again comes with a fixed lens and a sensor larger than the (Micro) Four Thirds format, but still smaller than the APS-C format. Sporting a resolution of 15 megapixels, one is bound to assume that it would outperform the Micro Four Thirds crowd at least by a small margin–but actually, the opposite seems to be the case.

With an overall score of 58 points, the PowerShot G1 X Mk II is ranked even lower than its predecessor, wich managed to score 60 points. Compared to current Micro Four Thirds models, however, the G1 X Mk II is way behind: the Olympus OM-D E-M10′s sensor has received 72 points in DxOMark’s test, and even the tiny Panasonic GM1 scores a solid 64 points. But here’s the most interesting part: even Canon’s own PowerShot S120 with its tiny 1/1.7″ sensor scores almost as high as the G1 X Mk II, though of course it doesn’t hold up when it comes to dynamic range and high ISO noise.

This isn’t the first time that we see Canon sensors receiving bad ratings by DxOMark, though. Just recently, their lab tested the EOS Rebel T5, and it, too, was rated way lower than its immediate competition. But despite the mediocre ratings, Canon DSLRs still enjoy a huge popularity especially on western markets, and even the EOS M mirrorless system is very popular over in Japan. When it comes to pure image quality, though, it seems that you’re better of with almost any other brand.

Canon EOS M2The Canon EOS M2 might have skipped out for a North American release, but new reports say we could see a completely new EOS M3 at Photokina. According to SLR Lounge, Canon is gearing up to launch a new mirrorless camera in the coming months. Supposedly Canon is working on two different models with one body aimed at the consumer market and then another version for the prosumer market.

This isn’t the first time we heard rumors of a split EOS M line. Previously, Canon’s next mirrorless bodies were reported to come with two versions as well with a higher-end model that would have been able to take more accessories such as an EVF. However, these rumors were quickly followed by the incrementally updated EOS M2, which fixed the original’s flaws with a faster AF system and added on Wi-Fi connectivity.

For now we don’t have very many specs on this supposed Canon EOS M3 other than making an assumption that it might include the Canon 70D’s dual-pixel AF system. Just yesterday, SLR Lounge also spotted a patent for a new 22-46mm F/3.5-5.6 EF-M mount lens.

Canon EF-M 22-46mm patent

Canon has recently patented a new lens for its EOS M mirrorless system, and it’s a rather unspectacular 22-46mm f3.5-5.6 zoom lens. With a focal length equivalent of 35-74mm and a short zoom factor of only 2.1x, it makes us wonder if Canon might be working on a small power-zoom lens with a pancake size factor. We’ve already seen such lenses for other mirrorless systems in the past: Micro Four Thirds has two lenses of this kind, one from Panasonic and one from Olympus, while there is also one for Sony E-mount and one for Nikon’s 1 system each.

A small, pancake-sized power-zoom lens makes the most sens on a small camera, together with which it makes for a truly pocketable setup. Seeing that the current EOS M cameras though relatively small for an APS-C system aren’t really pocketable, this furthermore makes us wonder if Canon could also be working on a smaller EOS M camera with a slimmer profile? In order to make its EOS M system more competitive, Canon will eventually have to diversify no only the lenses available but also the cameras.

An even smaller EOS M model might actually work with the entry-level crowd, and could make the system more popular. As to whether we’ll ever see more advanced EOS M cameras and lenses, we have our doubts as these would surely eat into Canon’s DSLR sales. But on the other hand, other mirrorless system are already doing that, anyway. So it would only logical for Canon to claim a piece of that cake. Only time will tell whether we’re ever going to see any of this.

Via Canon Watch

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 70D product images for announcement (3 of 6)It’s been speculated that if the Canon 7D Mark II were to ever exist, it would probably use a dual pixel sensor very similar to the Canon 70D. Well lo and behold there’s a new Northlight Images (translated) early report that backs up the theory. Northlight Images has heard that manufacturing issues with the dual pixel design of the APS-C sensor in the 70D has delayed the launch of the 7D Mark II.

More after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art Lens Review product lead (1 of 1)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 3.5

Sigma’s 50mm f1.4 DG HSM Art is the successor to the company’s previous 50mm f1.4 lens that was also held in very high regard. However, the new lens has been brought in line both in terms of design and image quality with the company’s new Global Vision–and specifically under its Art lineup. The focal length and aperture are an iconic one that many photographers swear by. In fact, many only shoot with this one lens.

But is Sigma’s 50mm f1.4 DG HSM Art offering enough to make you want to trade up?

Editor’s Note: Check out our first sample imagesfull review, and comparison posts against the 35mm f1.4 and 50mm f1.4 version 1.

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Canon Lens Upgrade Path

Last week we found out the Canon 1D X and 1D C were having autofocusing issues in subfreezing temperatures. Now Canon Rumors has uncovered another set of internal documents that claim Canon is charging customers for repairs on lenses and camera bodies with known issues. The same source that tipped off Canon’s freezing camera problems alleges that the Japanese camera company is charging customers $250-$450 for these repairs out of warranty.

Canon Rumors received several documents that cover various Canon lenses and camera bodies. Supposedly there’s even a glut of documentation on the EOS-1D X mirrorbox alone. The most damning thing about this whole situation is Canon, allegedly, is not fully disclosing the design flaw to the customer and simply passing the bill to them.

While this all sounds really weird, it is also quite unnerving.

Via Canon Rumors