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Samyang 35mm f1.4 for Canon with electronic contacts

Samyang, the South Korean company whose lenses are sold under the Rokinon brand name in the US, have recently teased a new product announcement for April 28th. Thanks to a video report from the Photo & Imaging Show that has been held in Seoul over Easter, we now have a pretty good idea of what is going to be announced that day.

Besides two new cine lenses, Samyang will very likely announce a new 35mm f1.4 for Canon EF-mount which, for the first time, will sport electronic contacts that allow the use of auto-exposure modes such as program and shutter priority mode. The two other lenses that Samyang is said to announce are a cine version of the 7.5mm f3.5 fisheye lens for Micro Four Thirds, sporting a T3.8 speed rating, as well as a cine version of the recently announced 12mm f2 lens for APS-C mirrorless systems.

Unfortunately, despite many customers asking for it, Samyang will not introduce any autofocus lenses soon, according to an interview with the website DicaHub. This is mainly due to licensing issues, but also the amount of information available on each camera system’s AF. Our guess is that the major player such as Canon and Nikon won’t just give away for free all the secrets of how their respective AF systems work.

Considering the lenses mentioned above have been shown off at the P&I show recently, it is safe to assume that they’ll be officially announced soon. Whether or not one or all of these will be announced next Monday, April the 28th, remains to be seen. Stay tuned!

Via Canon Watch

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DxOMark is announcing their Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art lens findings today. According to what they did in the lab, the company concludes that the lens is outperformed by the 55mm f1.4 Zeiss Otus lens only in terms of light transmission, distortion control, and vignetting control. Otherwise, they’re basically exactly spot on when it comes to sharpness numbers. The even more fascinating news is that they both wipe the floor with Canon’s f1.2 L offering–and hopefully will dispel the myth that someone should only go for all L glass when building their Canon kit.

The company didn’t test the lens on the Nikon D800E and we figure that this is mostly because the units going around right now are Canon mount.

More findings are after the jump.

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Canon 24-70mm f4L IS

Canon better come out with a new image stabilization version of its 24-70mm f2.8 lens already. Canon Watch has spotted the fourth patent in a row that illustrates the Japanese Camera company is planning to develop a new IS version of the ever popular 24-70mm f2.8 lens.

As of late Canon has been putting out patents on IS versions of all its lenses from the other extremely popular 17-40mm f4 lens, long telephoto lenses, and even its standard nifty fifty. The 24-70mm f2.8 however seems like the most likely lens candidate to get the IS treatment as it’s one of Canon’s most sought after lenses.

What’s more, third party lens makers are starting to catch up. Last year Tamron introduced its 24-70mm f2.8 SP VC complete with vibration compensation. We’re also still hanging onto earlier rumors of a Sigma 24-70mm f2 lens, which will probably come with image stabilization. Sigma’s already crammed optical stabilization into the 24-140mm f4 DG OS HSM—which isn’t available on official Canon glass—so it is extremely its new 24-70mm lens will also feature IS.

Via Canon Watch

Canon Rebel SL1 white edition

After the recent sensor debacle–as a reminder, two Canon cameras in a row scored poorly in DxOMark’s sensor tests–it appears that the brilliant marketing geniuses over at Canon World Headquarters decided that it was time for a new approach at winning new customers. Looking into the history books, they must’ve found a reference on Leica somewhere, more precisely on how Leica effectively re-launched one and the same camera over and over again for decades by making one special edition after the other.

Something like this must’ve happened for sure, as we have no other explanation for what Canon has just done: they launched a white edition EOS Rebel SL1 / EOS 100D + 18-55mm kit lens. Yes, both camera and lens are clad in exclusive Canon Polar White, which is just a little bit whiter than the white Nikon uses in their 1-series cameras. We’re joking of course. About the white, that is. Not about the white camera. That one’s real. And the lens.

If we’ve got you all excited now, better calm down and put that credit card back where it belongs: it appears the super special white Rebel SL1 will only be available on European markets. That’s too bad, because let’s face it, who wouldn’t fancy a white Rebel! Owning one of these would surely make you stand out from the crowd of DSLR users. That is, until some Japanese bloke comes along with his multi-colored Pentax

Via Canon Watch

Canon_G1_X_II_DxO_comparison

DxOMark continues to rate the sensors in current camera models, and their latest victim was the Canon G1 X Mk II. The successor to the original G1 X again comes with a fixed lens and a sensor larger than the (Micro) Four Thirds format, but still smaller than the APS-C format. Sporting a resolution of 15 megapixels, one is bound to assume that it would outperform the Micro Four Thirds crowd at least by a small margin–but actually, the opposite seems to be the case.

With an overall score of 58 points, the PowerShot G1 X Mk II is ranked even lower than its predecessor, wich managed to score 60 points. Compared to current Micro Four Thirds models, however, the G1 X Mk II is way behind: the Olympus OM-D E-M10′s sensor has received 72 points in DxOMark’s test, and even the tiny Panasonic GM1 scores a solid 64 points. But here’s the most interesting part: even Canon’s own PowerShot S120 with its tiny 1/1.7″ sensor scores almost as high as the G1 X Mk II, though of course it doesn’t hold up when it comes to dynamic range and high ISO noise.

This isn’t the first time that we see Canon sensors receiving bad ratings by DxOMark, though. Just recently, their lab tested the EOS Rebel T5, and it, too, was rated way lower than its immediate competition. But despite the mediocre ratings, Canon DSLRs still enjoy a huge popularity especially on western markets, and even the EOS M mirrorless system is very popular over in Japan. When it comes to pure image quality, though, it seems that you’re better of with almost any other brand.

Canon EOS M2The Canon EOS M2 might have skipped out for a North American release, but new reports say we could see a completely new EOS M3 at Photokina. According to SLR Lounge, Canon is gearing up to launch a new mirrorless camera in the coming months. Supposedly Canon is working on two different models with one body aimed at the consumer market and then another version for the prosumer market.

This isn’t the first time we heard rumors of a split EOS M line. Previously, Canon’s next mirrorless bodies were reported to come with two versions as well with a higher-end model that would have been able to take more accessories such as an EVF. However, these rumors were quickly followed by the incrementally updated EOS M2, which fixed the original’s flaws with a faster AF system and added on Wi-Fi connectivity.

For now we don’t have very many specs on this supposed Canon EOS M3 other than making an assumption that it might include the Canon 70D’s dual-pixel AF system. Just yesterday, SLR Lounge also spotted a patent for a new 22-46mm F/3.5-5.6 EF-M mount lens.