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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sigma vs Rokinon 35mm f1.4 comparison lead image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.8

Rokinon recently announced their AF chipped version of their 35mm f1.4 lens for Canon EF mount cameras. For this segment of the market, it’s about time. The new lens doesn’t sport an aperture ring and instead works perfectly with Canon’s DSLRs in a way very much like Zeiss does.

With the new chipped version of the lens, we decided to see how it holds up against the Sigma 35mm f1.4–the current king of the 35mm lenses in our book.

Editor’s Note: we’re not sanctioning this test to be the end all be all of all tests. It’s informal as per the way that the site’s philosophy works with our in the field real world reviews do.

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Review: Nikon D810

by Chris Gampat on 08/17/2014

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

The Nikon D810 is the latest flagship DSLR from Nikon without a vertical grip attached. Coming in two years after the D800 and D800E; it is seen as the replacement for both cameras. For the most part, Nikon has given users some very minor upgrades in the same way that Canon didn’t offer too much change from the 5D Mk II to the Mk III. Most notably with the D810 is the modest bump in megapixels with no AA filter, the D4s’ autofocusing system, better high ISO output, and something that Nikon users have been asking for for a very long time: small RAW mode. Indeed, with this camera it is now possible to not fill up your computer’s hard drive after a single professional shooting session.

The Nikon D810 is a heck of a lot of camera that we don’t think that everyone needs at all. And those that would make the best use of it are those that make a living from selling their images. But for many of those people, the upgrade may not be enough.

For others: the Nikon D810 may be the camera that makes you drop your current system and switch over immediately.

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Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Yongnuo YN600EX-RT Product Image 1

Yongnuo has announced a new Speedlite YN600EX-RT for Canon strobists. The radio-controlled flashgun comes with a variable electronic zoom head that shifts between 20 and 200mm, plus it can be tuned for high-speed sync up to 1/8000 second.

Once paired with a the YN-E3-RT radio the flash can also be set up to fire with E-TTL mode and manual power control. The best thing about Yongnuo flashes is users can ride on Canon’s official radio transmission protocol whilst being a cheaper alternative to Canon own Speedlite, the 600EX-RT. Just keep in mind the YN600EX-RT is not compatible with Yongnuo’s 2.4GHz triggering systems, including the RF-603 and YN-622.

Yongnuo has yet to release a price for the Speedlite YN600EX-RT but it should arrive this October. Until then check past the jump for more images and specs on this flashgun.

Via Lighting Rumors

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Essentials the Location Shooter (10 of 10)ISO 2001-80 sec

I have a confession to make: I wanted all the gear years ago. My entry point was the Canon 5D Mk II many, many moons ago. I wanted loads of L glass and I wanted to qualify for Canon Professional Services. Back then, you needed two pro level cameras, at least three of the lenses on their recommended list, and had to prove that you’re a working professional. It was going to be awesome. So I went on a quest. I started with a Canon 50mm f1.8–the nifty 50 that everyone gets first. After this I scored the 24-105mm f4 L. Next was the old 80-200mm f2.8 L. Then moved onto a 50mm f1.4. Then the 7D. Then a 35mm f1.4 L. Then an 85mm f1.8. Then flashes came into play. And triggers. And light modifiers. Before I knew it, my camera bag was getting really full and I needed another one.

But then other companies started to develop some amazing technology and I wanted a smaller camera. The Olympus EP2 became my next purchase after getting and using a bunch of Canon L glass and primes. It was small, could take great photos in the right situations, and felt great in the hands. But then the EP3 came out–and it was perhaps the fastest focusing camera in the world. And a spiral happened.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Cub and Company Shooter Strap Review images (6 of 8)ISO 8001-30 sec at f - 4.0

Editor’s Note: This is an OP-Ed. On the other hand, you can call it a rant. In fact, call it a rant.

Five years as an Editor in Chief, two years as a wedding photographer, a half a year at Magnum Photos, and two years as a working photojournalist taught me something: there is such a thing as a very bad photographer. Give them expensive gear, all the lights in the world and more and you’ll begin to see that if you don’t have the vision, creativity, and the know-how when it comes to working with a scene and creating something then there is a strong chance that you’re going to be creating useless garbage.

Trust us, we should know.

This year, the site is turning five years old–and we’ve been reviewing cameras since day one. The technology has become better and better and back then folks used to say that something is a good camera or a bad camera. To a certain point, this is still expressed in forums, in conversations amongst friends, and by people that have nothing better to do with their lives than be trolls. But I’m going to tell you the complete God’s honest truth right now about the world.

Are you ready?

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Fujifilm hybrid af pixes

In a similar move to what Canon has done with Hybrid AF on their 70D sensors, Fujifilm has put in a patent for Hybrid AF pixels according to Fuji Rumors. Essentially, what it’s doing is embedding special pixels that offer both phase detection and light gathering abilities onto the sensor to work in conjunction with the contrast detection focusing while also not jeopardizing image quality. Of course, the light transmission won’t be at 100% according to the patent due to the pixels functioning to do two jobs.

On other systems, the sensors have pixels just for phase detection–at least that’s what Egami is hinting at. Of course, when this hits the market we only expect it to do a marginally better job in its first iteration. In future iterations, it will most likely become much better as algorithms improve.

Indeed, when this does finally come to the consumer market, it will be awesome for street photographers, wedding photographers and event shooters. And it’ll be very exciting to see what happens when this comes out.