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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Adobe Lightroom Mobile for Android product images (3 of 3)ISO 4001-30 sec at f - 5.0

Adobe released Lightroom Mobile for tablets then phones last year, and it was only a matter of time until the popular image editing software came to Android devices. Earlier today, the company announced Adobe Lightroom Mobile for Android–something that was in the works for a very long time. Since then, Android has evolved to become what is arguably the most advanced platform for image taking due to manual controls and RAW DNG output capabilities with certain devices.

While the app in no way is terrible, it surely hasn’t made any major advancements. In fact, many of the big mobile editors are still ahead.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Adobe Lightroom Mobile for Android product images (2 of 3)ISO 4001-30 sec at f - 5.0

While iOS devices have had Adobe Lightroom mobile for a little while now, Android users can finally rejoice in the fact that the app can be used on their phones. Like all previous versions, Adobe Lightroom works by syncing collections–which then generate smart previews on your mobile device that are based on RAW DNG files for you to edit. Unfortunately, Adobe Lightroom Mobile doesn’t allow you to edit RAW DNG files put out by certain Android phones.

The app runs on Jellybean, KitKat or Lollipop and requires at least 1GB of RAM, a Quad Core CPU with 1.7 GHz and 8GB of internal storage. If you want Adobe Lightroom, you’ll need to at minimum sign up for the Creative Cloud plan targeted at photographers for $9.99/month.

Otherwise, no real new changes have come to the platform yet. Stay tuned for our review.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer CES 2014 MeFOTO phone adapter (10 of 10)ISO 8001-60 sec at f - 6.3

Since RAW DNG access was unlocked on the Nexus 5 via Camera FV-5, we’ve been playing a bit with it. What we didn’t expect were some incredibly versatile RAW DNG files with very good highlight recovery and pretty good shadow/black level recovery. After bringing the DNG files into Adobe Lightroom 5, we were able to see what the camera’s small sensor is capable of doing.

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Android App Camera FV-5 was the first app on the market to allow for manual control over the camera (providing you have Android 5.0 and later) and today it received a major update. The app now has full control over the shutter from 1/8000 to 0.08 of a second in addition to full ISO control, manual focusing control, and DNG RAW capture.

The app is the first that allows Android users to shoot RAW DNG files straight from the sensor. This puts Android ahead of iOS–which beat Android to the cake when it came to manual control over your images.

Earlier on this month, we shared how we used the Manual camera app with the Triggertrap flash adapter to have flash output in your image. Essentially, you need to shoot at a slow enough shutter. Neither Android nor iOS devices allow for triggering of flashes just yet.

For what it’s worth still, we’re not sure how many folks will want to shoot DNG files with their Android phones considering the fairly crummy lens in comparison to dedicated cameras, but it’s a cool concept for sure.

For download in the Google Play store for free or for a small fee. These features may only be available on the Nexus 5 and 6 at the moment, but we’re not 100% sure on that one.

Hat tip to Adam for sending us the tip!

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer EyeFi Mobi Cloud intro (1 of 1)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

We were already pretty satisfied with EyeFi Cloud and their hardware solutions, but today the company is announcing some upgrades to the platform. For starters, anyone can now use it–and this moves comes from the trend that they’ve seen with people using all manners of devices to shoot and store their images. Indeed, the app was a great solution to store them to begin with because it automatically pulled images from both the phone/tablet and your camera. But it was previously only available to Mobi customers. Now, Pro users can use it.

By having the app on your devices, you can now organize everything in one spot. However, it will only store JPEGs–sorry RAW shooters.

But there are also a couple of new enhancements that were made. You can now make adjustments to your images, crop, rotate, organize into folders (which you were able to do before) and even view the EXIF data.

The app’s latest update is available today on iOS, Android and Kindle. Annual memberships are available for $49.99/year and include support for unlimited photo syncing and storage.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Western Digital My Passport Wireless review images (1 of 7)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 6.3

Every photographer would love their own personal storage cloud. And in a way, Western Digital is giving that to photographers. The latest entry to their My Passport line is the My Passport Wireless, which is a step below their My Cloud drives. The advantage of the Cloud option is that you can access your images from anywhere as long as the drive is on. But with the My Passport Wireless drive, photographers get a different experience.

Hypothetical situation: you’re with a client, showing them some examples of work that you’ve done for engagement shoots. But they want to see more and you only have around two loaded onto your iPad. Simply boot up your Western Digital My Passport and access any of them that you’d like.

For photographers, security is important–and having your own hybrid of a server, cloud, and hard drive in one is more or less a godsend.

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