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All images by Chuck Miller. Used with permission.

Chuck Miller is a writer and photographer from Albany, N.Y. that’s been experimenting with film and digital photography for a long time. Some of his award-winning pictures involve cramming two rolls of 35mm film into a medium-format camera and exposing them simultaneously; modifying a camera to recreate the old horse racing “photo finish” exposures; and trying to resurrect Kodachrome color film by shooting pictures with color filters and composing the images from black-and-white sections.

However, he’s also very well versed in the use of Kodak Aerochrome–an infrared film first developed for military recon that essentially took greens in a scene and turned them purple. Other photographers likes Daniel Zvereff have done a great job with the film. Indeed, it was beautiful for artistic reasons until its discontinuation. But Chuck shot some incredible photos with the film, and we had the chance to talk to him about the experience.

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Image by Dan Zvereff. Used in our previous interview with him.

For all the lovers of the analog world out there, you should know that a recent Change.org petition to revive one of the greatest films that the world has seen: Kodak Aerochrome. Shooting Film first caught wind of the story and states that UK based Jasmin G is calling on Kodak Alaris and the Lomography company to revive the film. Lomography tried to do a variant called Lomochrome Purple, but it totally isn’t the same thing. While Lomochrome puts an emphasis on purple colors, Aerochrome put it on a pinkish purplish red.

How do they do this? For starters, Aerochrome was an infrared film originally developed for surveillance reasons. Years ago, the US would fly planes over the Congo and other regions with dense vegetation to find guerilla troops. When developed, the film would render the greens into a color like what you see in the image above that leads this story. However, later on the commercial world started to use it for art projects. Dan Zvereff and Richard Mosse are two famous photographers that come to mind at first. We have a full introduction to the film at this link–which also explains how it works.

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All images by Dan Zvereff. Used with permission

We first read about Dan Zvereff on Japan Camera Hunter, we were captivated by his images and his use of Kodak Aerochrome. The famous infrared film was designed for military applications and what it did was turn all greens into a shade of purple. But that’s just the short explanation, and we’ve got a more detailed and in depth analysis here.

Aerochrome was at the heart of Dan’s project called Introspective, where he travelled around the world for three months on a quest of self-discovery. Along the way he shot various landscapes and scenes in the Arctic, Europe, and Africa.

We talked to Dan a bit about the project and his incredible images.

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Richard Mosse has been getting loads of press lately since starting and working on his project in the Congo. He decided to use Kodak Aerochrome–which is an infrared film that renders greens to look red/purple/pink. Green is a color all over that area of the world and so the creative decision to use this film was an excellent and very original one.

So far, we’ve only heard about his still images, but Rich has also created a motion picture film shot on 16mm infrared film–basically the same Kodak Aerochrome. Sadly, the film is mostly gone now and the closest thing is the revived Lomography LomoChrome Purple.

There is a preview of the video after the jump.

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A while back, Lomography announced LomoChrome Purple. The first batch went out fast, and the second batch is now available for pre-order. It is available in 35mm and 120 formats. To refresh your memory, it is a film that is heavily based off of the old Kodak Aerochrome, which renders all greens as purples and pinks. This infrared film was also used for military applications, and lots more.

Still confused? We wrote a big guide about all this when it was first announced and it should help clear up the confusion. I was one of the first to pre-order a couple rolls of 120 film, and we will be sure to have a review on it as soon as we can get them shot and developed–let alone get me to a green spot. Lord knows there isn’t much in NYC.

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Photo by Richard Mosse

Today’s exciting announcement from Lomography about Lomochrome Purple is bound to get some people excited and others totally confused. First off, know that it is based off of Kodak Aerochrome–an old infrared film developed for government surveillance. Since it is infrared, that means that there are no real purple fields in the Congo.  So we’re here to answer a couple of big questions that you may have about the new film. Check out more information after the jump.

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