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aerochrome

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All images by Dan Zvereff. Used with permission

We first read about Dan Zvereff on Japan Camera Hunter, we were captivated by his images and his use of Kodak Aerochrome. The famous infrared film was designed for military applications and what it did was turn all greens into a shade of purple. But that’s just the short explanation, and we’ve got a more detailed and in depth analysis here.

Aerochrome was at the heart of Dan’s project called Introspective, where he travelled around the world for three months on a quest of self-discovery. Along the way he shot various landscapes and scenes in the Arctic, Europe, and Africa.

We talked to Dan a bit about the project and his incredible images.

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Richard Mosse has been getting loads of press lately since starting and working on his project in the Congo. He decided to use Kodak Aerochrome–which is an infrared film that renders greens to look red/purple/pink. Green is a color all over that area of the world and so the creative decision to use this film was an excellent and very original one.

So far, we’ve only heard about his still images, but Rich has also created a motion picture film shot on 16mm infrared film–basically the same Kodak Aerochrome. Sadly, the film is mostly gone now and the closest thing is the revived Lomography LomoChrome Purple.

There is a preview of the video after the jump.

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A while back, Lomography announced LomoChrome Purple. The first batch went out fast, and the second batch is now available for pre-order. It is available in 35mm and 120 formats. To refresh your memory, it is a film that is heavily based off of the old Kodak Aerochrome, which renders all greens as purples and pinks. This infrared film was also used for military applications, and lots more.

Still confused? We wrote a big guide about all this when it was first announced and it should help clear up the confusion. I was one of the first to pre-order a couple rolls of 120 film, and we will be sure to have a review on it as soon as we can get them shot and developed–let alone get me to a green spot. Lord knows there isn’t much in NYC.

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Photo by Richard Mosse

Today’s exciting announcement from Lomography about Lomochrome Purple is bound to get some people excited and others totally confused. First off, know that it is based off of Kodak Aerochrome–an old infrared film developed for government surveillance. Since it is infrared, that means that there are no real purple fields in the Congo.  So we’re here to answer a couple of big questions that you may have about the new film. Check out more information after the jump.

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I really don’t believe this happened, but Lomography managed to do something that was essentially lost for years. Kodak Aerochrome was an infrared film used by the government for surveillance. What it did was took greens and converted them to red and purple. That way, guerrilla fighters could easily be spotted and air raids could take down encampments with relative ease.

Today, Lomography is creating something relatively close: Lomochrome Purple. They’re guaranteeing delivery to be around July 2013. Things aren’t totally what they seem to be though: this is a color negative film–which means that it takes C-41 processing. Chrome films typically need E6 processing. They have more sample images on their website if you’re interested.

Correction: I was wrong. According to Kodak, it takes regular C-41 processing.

The film will be available in 120 and 35mm formats. And they’re not cheap: 120′s regular price is € 59.50 wc comes out to $80.59 for a pack of five; but they have a special price of € 56.53 which is $76.57. 35mm film costs  € 49.50/$67.05 but the special price is $63.70.

We’re hunting around for more information, so stay tuned.

Update: Lomo got back to us with more information about the film. Georg Thaler, who leads the film development team had this to say, “After years of researching, thousands of tests and tons of failures, we finally found a way to shift colors of regular color negative films. This is why this film needs to be processed C 41. It’s basically a Color negative, so E6 is not the right choice for this film.”

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