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50mm

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 50mm f2 Loxia review product photos (6 of 6)ISO 2001-125 sec at f - 4.0

Composing portrait images with a 50mm lens not only has to do with the normal composition rules, but also with elements of a person’s body. For example, they always say that you should focus on the eyes, and the folks at Weekly Imogen seem to agree. Their first tip has to do with specific face placement. They state that the eyes should be in the upper third area of the image because of the natural way that it draws a viewer in and lets them explore the rest of the image.

Imogen also says that using natural frames helps. The rest of the video on the perfect composition of portrait images with a 50mm lens is after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 24mm f1.4 first impressions (2 of 5)ISO 1001-25 sec at f - 1.4

Very recently, we had the chance to play with the Sigma 24mm f1.4 lens that was recently announced. As the latest addition to the Art series of lenses, this is Sigma’s third full frame prime lens that is part of their Global Vision initiative. The lens has a minimum focusing distance of 9.8 inches. Additionally, the 24mm incorporates both “F” Low Dispersion (FLD) glass and Special Low Dispersion (SLD) glass, has an optical formula 15 elements in 11 groups which the company claims to help to minimize chromatic aberration of magnification especially in the edge of the image field, and has aspherical elements placed near the rear of the lens. Finally, the lens has manual focus override even when the autofocus is activated.

We played with a pre-production copy, and what we saw got us more excited than any other lens that we’ve seen so far.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma dp and 50mm f1.4 product images first impressions (12 of 12)ISO 64001-40 sec at f - 5.6

In the world of photography–be it that the craft is carried out professionally or leisurely–it has always been a matter of dispute whether a prime lens is preferred over a zoom lens, or the other way around. We here at The Phoblographer tend to think rather pragmatically about this: each has its own merits and downsides, and it clearly depends on what you’re up to. Let’s however for a moment assume that you lean towards using prime lenses–or you want to. After years of lens testing lenses, we think there are five essential focal lengths that every photographer should try at least once. These are the 24mm super wide-angle, the 35mm wide-angle, the 50mm normal, the 85mm short telephoto, and the 135mm telephoto.

Before you go on, we also want you to remember that no one is making a bad camera or lens.

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Chris GampatThe Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 V2 images (2 of 2)ISO 1001-60 sec at f - 1.4

“Use a 50mm lens! It’s got a normal perspective! It will see just like you see! Taking photos will never be easier! Look at all the glorious bokeh!”

No. Just no. No a thousand times and a million times over that. So long have I heard something preached over and over again to consumers and photographers in general just starting to get into the photography world and too long have I wanted to say that it is nothing else but absolute garbage.

I was just like many of you at one point or another: a photographer that was a total novice and looking to learn about anything while trying to discover myself as a photographer. And in many cases I used the 50mm focal length. It really started with my 5D Mk II and the 50mm f1.8 II–otherwise known to many shooters as the cheapest nifty fifty you can get your hands on. Yes, it’s sharp when stopped down. Yes, you can get beautiful bokeh. And even more so, you can make potential clients look good and deliver beautiful images with one.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art Lens Review images (1 of 13)ISO 4001-800 sec at f - 3.5

We’re curious about the age long debate for you guys. While every photographer is taught that 50mm lenses give you a more normal perspective closer to what the human eye sees, many photographers have made very valid arguments for the 35mm field of view.

So with that in mind we wonder: do you see the world in 35mm or 50mm?

We’d love to hear your thoughts though. Click the poll below and also let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Do you see the world in 35mm or 50mm?

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Rokinon Sigma 85mm f1.4 three way comparison (1 of 3)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 3.5

A while ago, we did a comparison of the Canon 50mm f1.4 vs the 85mm f1.8 (due to price points) when it comes to taking portraits. Weekly Imogen recently did their own filmed portrait comparison and asked their readers which one they preferred. After a long time of gathering comments and feedback, many of the readers loved the look of the 85mm lens more. However, as some commenters state, the crew used a cropped sensor camera body–which for Canon actually renders an 80mm field of view not the 75mm as stated due to the 1.6x crop factor.

What this actually means is that a 50mm lens will give the field of view of an 80mm lens and an 85mm lens will give around 136mm to the viewer with a cropped sensor camera. Still though, the lenses will still act like their actual focal lengths–which means that an 85mm will still render a less distorted image.

The comments and feedback are an interesting back and forth debate–though many still lean more towards the 85mm. The video is after the jump.

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