10 Great Budget Lens Options For Street Photography

Street photography is a popular past time for photographers of all shapes and sizes thanks to it being something you can just grab your camera and go do for a few hours. Many photographers have obviously taken in beyond hobby status and turned it into successful careers, but for most, street photography is more about the artistic release being creative in an environment you have absolutely zero control over.

So with that in mind, many photographers are taking up street photography as a hobby when they aren’t out shooting portraits or weddings. You may be one of them, and you may be wondering about some good budget lens options for street photography. Well if that is the case then you are in luck, because today we have some great budget lens options for you.  Continue reading…

70mm IMAX Film vs 120 Film: What’s the Difference?

When it comes to a lot of photography, 35mm has been the standard for many years. In cinema, Super 35mm has been–and it’s around the size of APS-C digital. But what about larger formats? In photography, we’ve got 120 film and in cinema there’s IMAX. IMAX is considered large format in cinema and arguably it’s really beautiful. IMAX film is rated to be around 70mm in size; visually it’s really 65mm and 5mm are used for audio.

But how does it compare to 120 film?

Continue reading…

Baron Walton: I Really Love Shooting Album Covers

All images by Baron Walton. Used with permission.

Photographer Baron Walton is a truly creative type of photographer and he partially attributes this to being extroverted. “I develop a concept that I pitch to the artist/client,” says Baron in an email to the Phoblographer where he continues to state his work being concept driven. “It’s a form of visual communication that tells you something about the artist – even if you are not aware of them, you will understand something about their style.” We’ve all heard stories about how difficult it is to photograph artists on tour; but Baron has learned how to make the most of it.

Here’s his story!

Continue reading…

Review: Fujifilm Instax SQUARE SQ10 (Instax Square Format)

The Fujifilm Instax SQUARE SQ10 is quite an interesting, if not at times frustrating, camera that packs a whole lot of fun into an oddly shaped body that you’ll either not totally understand or fall head over heels for. The camera is Fujifilm’s latest addition to their Instax lineup of films and cameras serving as an in-between point for Instax Mini and Instax Wide. The Instax lineup of cameras have always been incredibly strong sellers amongst young women (many of my great, personal friends use Instax cameras and film). Part of the great selling point is the small size of the prints which are easy to carry and fun to share. But another part is the “cutesy” form factor. They sell so well in fact, that if you were to consider the sales of Fujifilm Instax vs the the rest of the digital and analog camera industry, Instax film far outsells anything in digital.

While the Fujifilm Instax SQUARE SQ10 isn’t exactly what I personally want, it’s going to be a hit with a lot of folks.

Continue reading…

Why Small Film Cameras Are The Ultimate Every Day Camera

This addiction of mine began a few years ago and continues into today; it helped spur a movement. Remember a few years ago how Fujifilm came onto the scene with cameras that had retro aesthetics, looked gorgeous and actually functioned well while doing it nowhere as expensive as Leica? Then Olympus hopped on board. Then Sony, and the train kept taking off. It got its fundamental start with film cameras and that whole movement. The idea of using a proper dial of some sort and retro-grade ergonomics has continued to enamor photographers everywhere–but no matter what camera manufacturers have done, I think that I can make a very valid argument that they’ve all come very close and done a fantastic job. However nothing fits into your hand or functions just right like some sort of small film camera.

Continue reading…

Useful Photography #177: Have a Portrait Subject Lean Forward from the Hips to Make a Chin Look Better

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

Photographer Peter Hurley and many others tell portrait photographers to instruct their subjects to stick their chin out. When someone sticks their chin out, they elongate the area under their chin and therefore make their jaw line look better when it comes to taking a portrait. So in order to take it one step further without making your subject visually uncomfortable, you can also tell them to bring their chin down just a tad. But then what do you after that?

Here’s a tip: when the chin can’t be moved any more and you’re shooting a relatively tight portrait, have your subject lean forward from the hips. It’s important to not do this from the back–have them keep their back straight because otherwise this can throw off stuff like shoulder and the chest. So instead, make it also like the equivalent of bending down a bit from the hips; but instead just bringing the body forward a tad.

What this effectively does is brings the chin and neck down even more. These photos of Byron from Sony Mirrorless Pro show this off perfectly. You can check them out after the jump.

Continue reading…

5 Best Cameras With WiFi For Instagrammers

As much as some of us in the industry would like to forget, many people these days are getting into photography specifically to get better at posting images to their Instagram and social media accounts. One step these people can take is by ditching their phone camera all together and upgrading to a dedicated camera kit. But it should be one with great WiFi or connectivity to make transferring from the camera to phone (to post to IG) as easy and painless as possible.

Today we wanted to list a few of the best cameras on the market right now in terms of connectivity, to make posting to social media that much easier for you. But beyond that, since we are looking at this specifically from the angle of an amateur or semi-pro who is using this camera mainly for Instagram and social media projects we will base our recommendations around the needs of that sort of user.  Continue reading…

First Impressions: Sony 12-24mm f4 G FE (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

The Sony 12-24mm f4 G FE is designed to compete with the options from Sigma, Canon, etc. So why would Sony design a lens like this, you wonder? I wondered the same, exact thing–and then I saw it and held it in person. The Sony 12-24mm f4 G FE is incredibly small and for the first time, I’m very glad to say that Sony has made a zoom lens that doesn’t make me cringe in terms of size in relation to a mirrorless camera. It’s also go weather sealing built in though Sony says that it isn’t to the spec of the G Master series.

Continue reading…