Fido: Abraham Lincoln’s Dog Was the First Presidential Dog to be Photographed

Meet Fido: Abraham Lincoln’s beloved dog and the first Presidential dog to be photographed and still have surviving records. Mr. Lincoln loved his dog and, before he became President, he was said to bring the dog with him into town often. The dog would sometimes fetch parcels and even wait outside the barbershop when he got a haircut.

When he became President, Fido got scared by the festivities. You know, just the typical stuff that all of your four legged friends get worried about on the 4th of July and any other time there are fireworks. Because of this, Mr. Lincoln decided that he couldn’t take Fido to D.C. with him.

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Memory Lane: A Look at Notable Films Discontinued In The Last 4 Years

The Fujifilm announcement earlier today that they would be officially discontinuing their PRO NS 160 Sheet film in Japan is just another reminder of the limited time we have left with the films that we have all grown to love. In the last 4 years alone we have lost some of the most iconic and legendary films, likely never to be truly replaced. So let’s take a quick look down memory lane at some of the discontinued emulsions that helped shape our our past.

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The History of Photography in 5 Minutes

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The folks over at COOPH have a brand new short video on the history of photography. It details important moments like the beginnings of camera obscura, the pinhole, the daguerreotype, Kodak, etc. It also includes names that you probably haven’t heard of or even thought of.

This video is easily consumed during a quick break, and you can check it out after the jump.

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Remembrance: Four Years Since the Death of Kodak Ektachrome

When folks in the photography industry talk about Kodak, they most likely reference things like Portra, Tri-X, and who could forget Kodachrome. When Kodachrome was discontinued, the company officially recommended Ektachrome as an alternative. To most of us, it wasn’t the same. The entire process of how Kodachrome got its colors came in the processing as it was a black and white film otherwise. To others, Ektachrome was magic in the right situations.

Ektachrome was Kodak’s last actual chrome film; but in March of 2012, the company discontinued the film not too long after the end of Kodachrome. This March, Ektachrome (in its color variant, because there is also an Infrared version) will have been completely discontinued for four years–a big sign of the way that the times have changed. These days, Ektar is the recommended replacement; but that’s a negative film with super saturated colors. Admittedly, it’s a beautiful film that in fact looks very digital in its color rendition.

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Five Historic Moments Where Photography Became Easier for All

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Lomo'Instant Wide image scan studio light (1 of 1)

Complaints about photography being easier and for everyone have always been present throughout the art form’s history. There is a theory that as we use technology, we become the technology. What that means is that we start to rely on it much more than our predecessors did. Photography has evolved over the years as technology became better. Today, it’s arguably to a point where everyone is a photographer even though the notion that a professional photographer is still one who makes the majority of their income from creating images.

Here are five big defining moments where photography changed and adapted to the needs of consumers to the point where major disruption happened.

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The Canon AE-1: The SLR That Helped Make Photography Simple

“The surprisingly affordable Canon AE-1: so advanced it’s simple.” that was the slogan behind an American commercial featuring the now well known Canon AE-1 SLR camera. It was such a hit because of the features that it offered, the automatic program exposure, and the variety of lenses available offered at a very affordable price point. When it launched in 1976, it cost $250–which was 40% more affordable than cameras from other companies at the time according to “Canon Historical Sketch: 1937-2007“.

While the Canon AE-1 was quite the successful product, it’s development was at one point halted. In 1975, a net loss from problems related to Canon’s calculators resulted in a major slowdown of its release. Yes; for those of you who don’t know, Canon makes calculators.

In April of 2016, the Canon AE-1 will be turning 40 years old. In those 40 years, it’s had quite a history.

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Documentary Shows Images from War That The Media Doesn’t

Screenshot taken from the video

Screenshot taken from the video

It’s no real secret that the media doesn’t exactly show the public all images from war. But it’s also a known fact that those specific images can end up changing public opinion about conflicts that we enter. A documentary that came out in 2013 called “The War You Don’t See” tries to explore those images and the media’s role in telling the public about what happens in conflicts.

The documentary really hits home in today’s world where we read about the news involving all of the conflicts currently going on in the Middle East.

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Kodak Aerocolor IV Film is a Great Way to Burn Over $1,500

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No, the film above isn’t Kodak Aerochrome or Lomochrome Purple–instead, it’s something much different though we’ve understand why experienced shooters might believe it to be otherwise.. The image above is from Kodak Aerocolor IV negative film 2460 and it costs you quite a pretty penny depending on the configuration you get of it: we’re talking well over $1,500.

Aerocolor IV is an ISO 125 color aerial film that is designed for aerial photography; and that’s just what the Canadian government has used it for. For years though, Aerochrome III infrared (not Aerochrome III color) was designed to deliver similar looking results with turning greens into pinks/purples as you see above. However, Aerocolor IV is a color aerial film, not an infrared.

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