Troyce Hoffman: Hypnotic Photos of the American West on Kodak Tri-X

All images by Troyce Hoffman. Used with permission.

“While Europe has thousands of years worth of ancient cities and temples, America has its great canyons, mountains, forests, and deserts; these are our great wonders,” says northern California based Photographer Troyce Hoffman. “They are the great equalizer in our country; they belong to both rich and poor serving as a vast communal backyard.” Troyce’s images are mostly shot in the public lands of the American West and he has worked to capture images of the American West using Kodak Tri-x for a while now.

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Mike Ioannidis: From Observer to Analog Film Photo Creator (NSFW)

All images by Mike Ioannidis. Used with permission.

Photographer Mike Ioannidis is a 26 year old mechanical engineer that loves bike riding, climbing and analog photography. He lives in Athens, Greece.  “…photography has played a vital role in my life!” Mike tells us about the last seven years. “Although it doesn’t pay my bills, it serves a greater purpose!” For Mike, photography is a form of self expression. He gets a chance to express emotions, feelings and capture what he sees, in the unique way.

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William Kerr’s Beautiful Kodak Tri-X Food Photography

All images and words by William Kerr. Used with permission.

We’ve received well over 1,000 submissions for our analog photography zine; and while you all know that the best of the best (no more than 20) photographers are getting into the zine there are a number of photographers that still have very good work surely worthy of being profiled on our website. One of those photographers is William Kerr–who loves food photography and Kodak Tri-X in the 6×7 format. Crazy, right? You’d typically see food in color, but William does it in shades of light, blacks, whites, and shadows.

I genuinely think that you’re about to fall in love with his submission.

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7 Pinhole Photographers to Inspire You for World Pinhole Day

Lead photo by Kenneth Leishman. All images used with permission in our interviews.

Pinhole photography: it’s arguably one of the oldest forms of photography and the art that’s been available. These days, it’s used in digital variations but by far many of the best pinhole photographers these days shoot film. So in celebration of the upcoming World Pinhole Day this year, we’ve rounded up a number of our favorite pinhole photographers we’ve interviewed.

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Katy Maclachlan: My Mom’s Canon AE-1 and Kodak Portra 400

All images by Katy Maclachlan. Used with permission.

In our continued features of analog photographers, we now get brought to photographer Katy Maclachlan. Her submission is one of the many that I genuinely feel is more than well suited to be featured on our website, but still not quite there for our upcoming analog zine. More importantly though, Katy’s work has soul. It has personality; and overall it’s still pretty darn beautiful.

Besides, she’s also got a pretty heartwarming story to go with it.

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NY Diary: The City in Glorious, Raw, Gritty Black and White

All images by Federico Chiesa. Used with Creative Commons Permission.

When you think about a lot of the more famous photos of NYC, it’s easy to bring to mind the grit that you’ve known about it. That’s what Federico Chiesa seems to be conveying in his series, NY Diary. While toting along his Leica M9 and a Voigtlander 25mm lens, he documented a lot of happenings in the city while on a trip here.

Many of his images convey the emotions of people and are a play on various factors within a scene. These factors and elements are only brought together better using black and white.

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Rainer Wengel’s Photos of the Aurora Borealis on Film Will Captivate You

All images by Rainer Wengel. Used with Creative Commons Permission.

Of course, one of the best things for landscape photographers to capture is the Aurora Borealis–but capturing it on film the way Rainer Wengel did is a whole nother different level of magic. While this seems really simple to a lot of photographers, take into consideration that Rainer didn’t do this on 35mm film. Instead, it’s on 6×9 and 6×17 medium format as well as in a 6×17 format using a large format camera. What this requires is a proper tripod, exposure settings, processing, etc.

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