web analytics

News

logo upscaled the phoblographer

The winners of our Leica, Fujifilm and Calumet contests have been decided. The two photo contests were two of the toughest that we’ve ever hosted with loads and loads of great street photography and landscape entries. But in the end, only a couple of folks are getting brand new cameras.

Did you win? Hit the jump to see for yourself.

[click to continue…]

flickr2

Flickr has apologized for selling creative commons images as wall art, turning a profit from images specifically labeled not for commercial use. As a penance Flickr has pulled down all the CC pictures from its wall art selection any sales it’s made with the photos will be refunded.

Bernardo Hernandez, head of Flickr at Yahoo, posted a blog post entitled “An Update on Flickr Wall Art,” humbly noting “we’re sorry we let some of you down.”

“[…] [M]any felt that including Creative Commons-licensed work in this service wasn’t within the spirit of the Commons and our sharing community,” Bernardo wrote. “We hear and understand your concerns, and we always want to ensure that we’re acting within the spirit with which the community has contributed.”

Flickr’s Creative Commons section has long been a special part site, which allows photographers to freely post and share their images for anyone to use with the only caveat that these photos cannot be sold for money. Oddly enough Flickr broke its own rule in November by adding a large portion of the CC collection Wall Art printing service. Soon after the Flickr community began complaining that the image-hosting site was selling photographers’ work without giving part of the profit to the original artists.

Still Flickr was technically within its own rights picking only images with a “non-commercial” restriction. In the same statement Bernardo outlined the Wall Art service will continue, but it will not tap into creative commons-licensed images unless photographers reach out to the Flickr curation team themselves. Jump past the break to

Via DIY Photography

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony NEX 7 product images (2 of 6)ISO 400

A new Sony A7000 seems ever more likely as another source has told Sony Alpha Rumors we will see a new high-end APS-C E-mount camera in 2015. There wasn’t any definite word on specs, but the camera will purportedly be step up from the current Sony A6000. Similarly an exact release date for this camera is still up in the air, however, the source claims the camera was practically finalized when they saw it.

A few months ago we heard the A7000 would be the end all, be all of Sony’s APS-C camera line equipped with a 1/8000 second shutter, weather sealing, and capable of 4K video. Essentially this will be a high-end compact mirrorless camera in every way the Sony A7 Mk II and Sony A7s are except with a smaller sensor. This could also mean that the new focusing improvements added to the a7 Mk II could come to this camera.

It was also rumored to come with a new 16-50mm f3.5-5.6 power-zoom lens. Supposedly this revised lens will be big step up in image quality from the current kit lens, which we’ve previously used much to our chagrin because of its softness and tendency to fringe at the mere sight of a high-contrast scene.

Leica-Submit-images

Hi everyone,

This is just a note to tell everyone that we’re going to announce the winners of our Leica and Fujifilm contests on Saturday. There are lots and lots of entries in both sections and it’s taking a while to make a decision.

We’re sorry for the inconvenience.

And just to let you know: the most popular image for each contest is not the winner.

Stay tuned!

tumblr_inline_nghw91Z21W1qm4rc3

Yesterday, Instagram announced the addition of five new filters to their app. It’s been a while since they introduced new ones, but these are a bit more contemporary than others. The new filters: slumber, crema, ludwig, aden and perpetua are available in the latest update to the app.

Instagram stated in their blog post that these filters were inspired by fashion and design–which probably means that you’re not going to be applying them to your coffee or kitten photos. Of course, you could always be Men’s Wear Dog.

The company also added a new manage button that lets you arrange the filters.

At the moment of publishing this article, they haven’t hit my Nexus 5 yet. But we’re sure that it will roll out to everyone soon.

Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Phase One A-series Product Images-8

Phase One has introduced an all-new line of A-series cameras working together with camera and lens maker, Alpa technology. The new A-series consists of three new camera bodies including the A250, A260, and A280.

The new cameras are based on ALPA’s 12TC mirrorless body. However, each camera is noticeably different from the other. The A280 for instance is a full-frame 645 resolution monster with an 80MP sensor. Meanwhile, the Phase One A260 is equipped with a still admirable 60MP full sensor and capable of hour-long exposures. Lastly, the A250 has a (you guessed it) 50MP medium format sensor plus the ability to stream Live View wireless to an iOS device.

Otherwise the three camera bodies come kitted with a 35mm Rodenstock Alpar lens. Users can also pick up two other available Alpa HR Alpagon lenses including an ultra-side 23 mm or the all around 70mm.

The cameras are available now with the Phase One A250 starting at $47,000, the A260 for $48,000, while the A280 rings up for whopping $55,000. Pricing for the optional Alpa HR Alpagon lenses comes to $9,070 for the 23mm f5.6 and $4,520 for the 70mm f5.6 lens.

See more product specs and images after the break