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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I have a saying and a standard that I try to live by, which my mentor taught me. It goes: “The best images deliver the details and don’t force your viewers to search for them.”

They find a way to reach out of the screen or print and grab at someone. Want some great examples? If we really had to list them, we’d say compelling food photography, close and intimate street photography, shocking images in the news, etc. These photos find a way to tell a complete story in a single photo. But this doesn’t always mean that you need to overthink your process. It’s sometimes just as simple as getting a different angle.

For the sake of being vain, let’s analyze something that everyone does: food photography that you post onto your social media pages. After the jump, you’ll be able to see two images that I shot; and one is clearly more detail oriented. Sure, they’re both quick snapshots, but one image clearly tells a lot more than the other.

So with that said, you should keep in mind that absolutely no subject is boring–you just haven’t found the right angle that will inspire people or elicit an emotion. And as a photographer and artist, it’s your job to do that.

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2011 pinhole

Photo by Matt Bigwood

All images by their respective owners. Originally featured in our initial blog posts with permission.

Pinhole cameras: they’re such an incredible thing of mystery. They can be large, small, unconventional, or totally fair-looking. Something that they all share in common is the fact that they’re bound to shoot a very long exposure and the image will usually look incredible with the right creative knowledge.

We’ve featured lots of cool pinhole work here on the site, but a couple of cameras really stand out at us. Here they are.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 50mm f2.8 touit extra photos (8 of 14)ISO 2001-1000 sec at f - 2.8

Here in the NorthEast of the USA, spring is in the air. With spring comes lots of new opportunities to go out there and take photos of everything around you, but in particular, spring is an excellent time for you to go out there and shoot photos with film. Why shoot film? Because film photography forces you to sit there and get everything perfectly right in the camera before you press the shutter. You’ll make decisions that you never thought of before like how highlights are affecting the scene, how dark the shadows are, and what the colors will look like. It will also force you to do things like spot metering and figuring out the right exposure that you want–not what the camera is telling you.

Here are some great reasons to get out there and shoot film this Spring.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 15mm f1.7 review product photos (2 of 6)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 3.5

Street photographers generally need a few things when they go shooting. First and foremost, their camera bag (or bag of any sort) needs to be low profile and not attract any attention to them. In fact, they need to blend in as much as they possibly can. But they also need quick access to their gear and they need to be able to move quickly. While moving quickly can depend on the photographer’s specific speed, they no doubt will be able to move master if they have less weight on them. So with that in mind, a photographer needs a small, lightweight bag that won’t make them want to bring too much with them.

If this sounds like you, we’ve compiled a list of low profile camera bags that you’ll want to take a look at.

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julius motal the phoblographer rni presets lightroom-5

When I reached 100 followers on Instagram, I thought I had arrived. Instagram was largely new to me, and a confusing place at first, too, because there were, and are, no metrics, unlike Flickr where I had put my photography up until that point. Instagram was the place to be, and if I could get enough traction, my worth as a photographer would be solidified in hearts and numbers. There were folks with followers in the tens and hundreds of thousands, some even in the millions. Wouldn’t that be nice? A massive following the thought wasn’t, and it took a while for me to shake it. [click to continue…]

marius+vieth

Editor’s Note: this is a syndicated blog post from Marius Vieth. It and the images in the post are being republished with permission.

GAS, also known as Gear Acquisition Syndrome, is very common among photographers. It simply means that you just can’t get enough new lenses, equipment and upgrade your cam as soon as possible in order to have more options and – according to the seemingly prevalent opinion – become better. But have you ever thought about the opposite side of this imaginary disease – the Gear Avoidance Syndrome? A syndrome that might even be good for you and your photography. And your wallet.

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