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One of the main characteristics in digital photography is that you can shoot more at no extra cost. With film, every frame is money spent, which can inspire more carefully thought-out compositions. If you’re footing the bill, that’s something to keep in mind. DSLRs, on the other hand, lend themselves to a certain laziness–a sort of haphazard shooting that can lead to large crop of bad photos, and when you’re sitting down to edit, you don’t want to trudge through the muck. This isn’t always the case, but it happens.

More importantly, whether you’re at a concert, a party, on assignment or anything else, you’ll want to use the film mentality while taking advantage of digital’s inherent capacity for multitudes. One of the worst feelings is when you realize during the editing session that there’s a shot you need that you didn’t get for whatever reason. It’s happened to me and many others, I’m sure.

Shooting more often entails having several different angles of the same scene. It means that you have more options to work with, some of which could possibly be repurposed for future projects, but it also means that you need to be just as judicious in your editing process. Don’t allow a photo through that doesn’t fit the bill entirely, but don’t delete it. You might be able to use it somewhere else.

Working with more photos can be overwhelming at times, but it’s easier to cut down than having to struggle to find the right one in a smaller batch. Exercise care in shooting means you’ll have an easier time editing because it feels far better to deal with a batch of good photos than a mixed bag.

When you shoot more, you also stand a greater chance of getting the perfect shot. Why settle for anything less?

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All images by Jeff Gusky. Used with permission.

If you stumbled upon a discovery of a lifetime, how would you react? How would you photograph it? That’s what we were curious about with photographer Jeff Gusky, who as we previously reported on discovered underground cities under surface inside the WWI trenches in France. They were intricate and made by various peoples: the French, Americans, Germans, etc.

Photographing these places was a major historical finding of great significance. We had the opportunity to talk to Jeff about the WWI Underground and what it was like to find all the artifacts.

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 Getting It Rite In Camera Is Important Now gservo-01946-20140708

Creating an image is similar to constructing a building. If you don’t get it right, you have to go back in and fix it. Some people like to say “I can fix it in post” and while this is true, it’s not always efficient. Sometimes if you take your time and get it right in the camera first you can shave hours off of your production time by taking a few extra minutes to get your exposure and composition correct. Sitting in front of your computer may not always be a choice depending on circumstances.

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IbarionexThePhoblographerDocumentaryPhotography01

Many associate the golden era of documentary photography with the heyday of picture magazines such as Life and Look magazine, but the practice of the photo story is still alive and well. Though such work may not find a home within the pages of most of today’s consumer magazines, there is still an interest in such bodies of work which can be frequently found online.

These photographers, many of whom I have had the opportunity to interview on my podcast, The Candid Frame, focus on more than just getting a nice-looking singular image. Instead, they show the power of a photo story where multiple images are used to convey facts, emotion and drama. These techniques can be used just as effectively by the rest of us whether we are focusing our lens on the lives of others or our own.

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IbarionexThePhoblographerPhotoStory01

There are times when an activity or event needs more than a single image to tell the whole story. A photo essay or photo story provides the means to reveal several facets of the narrative in visually interesting and dynamic ways.

You don’t have to be a photojournalist to practice these techniques. You can apply these simple principles when you are photographing a family event, sports or a social occasion.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon G1x product images (7 of 7)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

When walking around the streets of any big city, the best camera is always the one that you have on you. But lots of us here at the Phoblographer love point and shoots. These cameras are lightweight, better than a phone, small, and so low profile that no one will think that you look like a creep. But what we care about a whole lot more is the image quality–and many modern cameras perform more than well enough to please even the most snobbish of shooters.

Here are our picks for the best cameras for street photography.

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