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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Tap and Dye Horween CXL Camera Strap product images (4 of 8)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 2.8

It’s very easy to think that a new camera or a new lens is the answer to a photographic impasse. I have, on many occasions, scrolled through seemingly endless eBay listings of cameras I can’t afford, but they hold an allure because they’re new to me and ostensibly better than what I have. Yet, a new camera won’t make me or anyone a better photographer. Will it up the image quality on a technical level? Most probably, but it won’t up the photograph’s emotional resonance. The camera is the first step towards making photographs, but once a creative block sets in, a new (or used) camera or lens won’t do anything but make a hole in your bank account. There are things besides gear that can rejuvenate you.

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Taking a photo with a tablet

A colleague of mine recently asked a question about wedding photography after talking about his experience of shooting his first one. He ended it very stressed out and eventually complained about so many folks holding up iPads and phones to take a photo during the ceremony and in some instances getting in the way of his photo-taking opportunity. While yes, it’s unfortunate that it ruined his shot I believe that event shooting and wedding shooting has changed to the point where we as photographers should instead be embracing this instead of trying to fight it.

Let’s be honest here, no one in the crowd taking a photo with their phone, tablet or even a little DSLR is your competition. Absolutely no one is going to shoot a photo and then charge the bride and groom for it. Yes, they’re getting in the way. Yes, it’s annoying. But instead of fretting over how a single image of yours is now ruined, turn it into something else immediately. If you’re at the back of the hall and you suddenly see cameras, phones and tablets go up you shouldn’t try to fight it. Embrace it and shoot that instance because at the end of the day your job is to be a documentarian.

If you’re at a wedding, and trying to snap a photo of the cake or a specific moment and someone’s flash is getting in the way and messing up your exposures, then that’s one thing. You can easily and politely ask them to stop for around 30 seconds so that you can take photos that the happy couple will remember and cherish later on in life. But if someone is simply just taking a photo, then that shouldn’t really bother you or prevent you from doing your job.

Of course, you can always ensure that this doesn’t happen to begin with by getting more creative with your angles and positioning as well as having a second shooter if that option is available to you in your budget. Furthermore, I don’t think that we can really stop people from taking pictures at this stage of the game. Everyone has a phone on them or a tablet and everyone loves taking photos all the time even though it’s not anywhere in the same realm or reason as to why you’re doing it. At certain times, telling folks to stop taking photos isn’t a bad idea–but again only at certain times.

Otherwise, it’s time that we embrace it rather than fight it.

julius motal the phoblographer graduates silhouette

I certainly didn’t get into this racket for the money, and while I haven’t been in it very long, I’ve had time to look at the kinds of success that photographers have enjoyed. They seem to exist along a spectrum. At one end, there’s truly beautiful work and post-mortem recognition. At the other, there’s immense wealth with photographs that leave most scratching their heads (read: Peter Lik). Money helps. It’s good to know that I can afford rent and the occasional night out, but I’m not looking for millions down the line.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Tokina 70-200mm f4 Pro first impressions samples (6 of 8)ISO 1001-1000 sec at f - 4.0

When any photographer starts out, they have a vast journey ahead of them. Photography has so many different paths and intertwining roads that it can be tough to navigate on the path to either becoming a professional, semi-professional, or hobbyist. It takes refinement and what you’ll find is that you’re going to shed skin in order to keep growing and changing like an animal sheds an exoskeleton.

Here’s some advice that we have for the folks who are on the journey to finding their own photographic style.

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julius motal the phoblographer panasonic lx100 product image-5

One of the things that we often get asked is what the best camera is for each system if you just want the most bang for your buck. So what determines this? For the most part, it has to do with the feature set since not a single camera these days can take a bad picture. However, that also needs to be weighed accordingly with the price.

We’ve gone through our reviews to find which camera gives you the most bang for your buck.

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Editor’s Note: This blog post was originally published by Marius Vieth. It is being syndicated here with permission.

This is the story of how I wrestled with death twice to live for photography. Before I wrote this article, I told a couple of people about it since it means so much to me. Although some didn’t understand how I could talk so openly about this topic, I decided that it’s my duty to generate awareness and help others even if it means that I’m revealing my biggest weakness in front of the world.

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