5 Cool New Features Found in the New Fujifilm X100F

The new Fujifilm X100F is here and brings with it a number of big upgrades from its predecessor. The Fujifilm X100 series of cameras have always been targeted at street and documentary photographers. They’re fantastic cameras that are both pretty and low profile in design. If you were to equate it to anything in the film world, it would be the Hexar AF. Since it’s inception, the camera has received a number of upgrades in image quality, autofocus, to the viewfinder, and in minor ways to the design.

Let’s take a look at some of the new things that make this camera so exciting.

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A Short Conversation with Florian “Doc” Kaps about Instant Film

Analog photography has made a comeback in big ways–with digital photography making things less personal and more fleeting there’s obviously a need and want for something that’s truly an original. Companies like The Impossible Project, Lomography, and others are doing well. And a new book by Florian “Doc” Kaps called Polaroid looks to give us the history and story of the medium.

Mr. Kaps and his team were adamant about preventing Polaroid’s extinction in 2008 with The Impossible Project, and in this book he collects over 250 Polaroids to tell the story of the medium. From Edwin Land’s development of instant film in the 1940s to its resurgence today, Doc explores Polaroid’s influence on visual culture through found portraits, anthropology, erotica, fashion, and fine art.

And more importantly: the inventor of the Polaroid was actually a woman.

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The Kingdom: On Black and White Film, and Finding a Home

We recently asked new Staff Contributor James Moreton to discuss his project The Kingdom, how he became interested in photography and why black and white film?

The Kingdom is a project based in the area of Northern Ireland where I now call home. Dalriada was an ancient Gaelic over-kingdom that stretched from the Glens of Antrim right up to Argyll and Lochaber in Scotland – at that time it was easier for people to cross the sea between Ireland and Scotland than to cross the hills over the land. For me personally, this project is a reaction to finally finding a place to call home; when I was 21 I had lived in 21 different places – so I am a bit of a nomad! When I moved here the landscape fascinated and intrigued me and I wanted to try and take a snapshot of my local community. I have a strong creative streak and desire to express myself, usually through photography, and this felt like a decent backbone to a series of pictures.

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After The Kit: 5 Killer Lens Upgrades for Canon

Canon is still the top dog in this industry and no doubt many of you received a new camera over the recent holiday season, quite possibly a Canon camera. Today, just as we have done with Fujifilm previously, we will be taking a look at some of our picks as the top lens upgrades to grow your Canon kit following whatever kit lens you got with your camera (likely the 18-55mm).

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The Effects of Exposure and Development Times on Wet Plate Collodion

Recently I have been seeing a lot of people having problems identifying the signs that their plates are either overdeveloped or overexposed, so I decided to do the following simple exercise that should make it easier for folks with a discerning eye to see if one of these troubles may be possibly plaguing them at the moment.

I might have mentioned before that when working with wet plate collodion it is possible to overexpose and underdevelop a plate and still achieve a tolerably good plate. It is also possible to SLIGHTLY underexpose and overdevelop, but only very slightly before serious ugliness sets in.

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After The Kit: 5 Killer Lens Upgrades For The Fujifilm X-Series

One of the biggest questions photographers get asked and that they ask themselves after purchasing a new camera kit is, “What’s next?” What lens should they add to their kit or upgrade to next? Well, today we start our new series looking at just that, with 5 killer upgrade options for photographers looking to go beyond the kit lens to improve their capabilities in the new year.

The first system we are looking at is the Fujifilm X-Series, so if any of you got a new X-T2 or X-Pro2 for the holidays, this will be a post you want to take a look at. Continue reading…

Screw the Rule of Thirds: “Composition” For Street Photographers

This is a syndicated blog post from La Noir Image. Subscribe for as little as $15/year for this and much more.

All images and post by Mason Resnick

“I’VE SEEN THIS PICTURE BEFORE.”

It may be cliché to say that rules are made to be broken, but it can be argued that the genre of street photography is the photographic discipline where breaking the rules will most likely allow you to see—and capture—more interesting photographs.

Traditional compositional rules come out of pre-photographic art forms. Leading lines, the rule of thirds, centered subjects and so on were developed over centuries by painters and others using two-dimensional forms in order to organize the content of their images and create a common visual language.

Visual artists—painters, photographers, cinematographers and the like—are taught these rules and mostly conform to them.

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