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Editor’s Note: This blog post was originally published over at Eric Kim’s blog. It is being syndicated with permission.

At Gulf Photo Plus, as a part of the “Street Photography Series” in November in Dubai, I gave a free talk on street photography yesterday (11/24/2014). The title of my presentation was: “10 Lessons Street Photography Has Taught Me About Life” in which I share some of my personal philosophies about street photography (and life).

Tonight at 7:00pm at Gulf Photo Plus is the opening exhibition for “STREET.” — an international street photography exhibition curated by me and the team at GPP. If you’re free, come join us! :)

You might also like to read my article, “26 Lessons Life Has Taught Me About Street Photography” and check out my free presentations on street photography on Slideshare.

See the slideshow after the jump.

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©Jesse Frohman

All images by Jesse Frohman. Used with permission.

The assignment was to photograph Kurt Cobain and Nirvana for the London Observer. Jesse Frohman had everything ready to go for an 11am shoot on location, when the call came in that he would have to photograph the band in the basement of the Omni Hotel, which wasn’t the agreed-upon location. Moreover, Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain was hours late for a five-hour shoot, and when he did arrive, he was high. This, however, didn’t hinder Frohman, an accomplished portrait photographer who had worked for Irving Penn, a legend in his own right. The shoot at the Omni Hotel led into Nirvana’s iconic Unplugged in New York concert with MTV. Now, more than 20 years after Cobain’s death, Jesse has compiled that shoot into a book, “Kurt Cobain: The Last Session.”

You can check out more of Jesse’s work on his website. But we talked to Mr. Frohman about the last iconic session nearly 20 years later.

Editor’s note: This interview has been edited and condensed.


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Over the years, I’ve been doing more and more portraiture in attempts to get better and to make people feel genuinely more confident about themselves. It takes time, understanding, and a lot of hard work. But when giving the images to my subjects, all that is ever heard is genuine love for the portraits not only from my subjects but their loved ones, friends, and colleagues. It’s wonderful.

And shooting film has taught me something even more important.

The tradition in portraiture is to always focus on the eyes. It’s said over and over again all the time. But to be honest, I think that it’s about time to break that rule in certain situations.


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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Unravelling the Mysteries of the Little Black Box book review images (1 of 5)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 3.2

It’s not very often that an innovative book for photographers makes a splash, but Unravelling the Mysteries of the Little Black Box is an eBook that will turn heads and make you excited about learning all of the intricacies of the art form. Even as a veteran photographer for many years, I found the content in this book from Shaun Hines to be absolutely wonderful.

So what makes the book so innovative? Unlike many other eBooks on the market, Mysteries of the Little Black Box has multiple interactive elements. You aren’t simply just flicking from left to right to read scenes. The book requires active involvement from the reader to get the most from it.

And if you’re going to recommend any book to a person still learning, hands down this is the one.

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All images by Chuck Baker. Used with permission.

Making your own cameras usually results in the creation of pinhole cameras, but photographer Chuck Baker recently created a large format 5×7″ camera after being inspired by a 20×24″ camera. He tells us that he wanted to create a smaller version and that the stuff that he collects from garage sales helped him to build a camera using an old film enlarger.

For the uninformed, 35mm film needed to use enlargers in order to print them at a larger size. These enlargers had lenses, bellows, etc. And in many cases they are indeed turned into cameras. But the story about this one from Mr. Baker really amazed us. His ingenuity inspired us–and his knack for tinkering helped him to create his own large format camera.

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Whether you think it’s hipster or not–let’s be frank, instant film cameras are cool. Who cares if they’re hipster? There are ways that you can make them seem much less so. But even if you have that stigma, the cameras are still capable of producing beautiful work that editors, models, and people in general love. Heck, an entire app was created to emulate the looks of these cameras!

Picking the right one though isn’t so simple. There are many options available both old and new–and you really just need to get the right one for you. That’s much easier said than done though.

Here’s our Guide to Instant Film Cameras and picking the right one for you.


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