Five Pinhole Photography Tips for Beginners Experimenting With Long Exposures

In a few days from the publication of this piece, we celebrate World Pinhole Photography Day. Pinhole photography is very experimental, ethereal and really cool. More importantly, it’s just plain fun to do whenever you get a chance. Lots of photographers have done pinhole photography and many believe it to become absolutely addicting due to the slow and very different process from everything else out there.

For the photographer just getting into pinhole photography, check out these tips.

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Jordan Matter Shows You How to Create Portraits Right Outside Your Home

Lead image by Chris Gampat.

Shutterbug and photographer Jordan Matter are at it again with a new Portrait Tutorial video showcasing tips for photographers who are just starting out in portraiture. While some photographers simply don’t know how to work with people; other photographer are just challenged by finding better locations to begin with. But Jordan shows you how to make the most of something random and all around you.

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Ivan Tsupka’s Portrait Lighting Experiments with On-Camera Flash

All images by Ivan Tsupka. Used with permission.

We’ve previously featured the experimental portraits of Ivan Tsupka; and something I’ve always loved about Ivan’s work is his openness to be very experimental with the work and concepts. So recently, he pitched his Flashing Lights series to us and showed in an email a lot of what’s possible when working with models, a flashy dress, and moving lights.

Here’s what Ivan did in his own words.

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An Introduction to Understanding Portrait Photography in Medium Format

If you’re a photographer who has thought about getting into the medium format world, then congratulations: you’re ready to step up into the next level of creating better portraits. You see, medium format photography often forces photographers to think in a different way simply because the format is so much larger than traditional digital and film photography formats. Artistically speaking things can change. But more importantly, things change technically.

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Street Photography Tutorial: How Street Photographer Jonathan Higbee Works a Scene

Recently, we teamed up with photographer Jonathan Higbee for a free, one hour Facebook Live Street Photography Tutorial on how he works a scene when it comes to street photography. During the session, we answered questions live and Jon also talked about the way he specifically works vs what many other photographers do most of the time.

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Making the Most of the Fujifilm X Series System for Portraiture

Arguably, Fujifilm’s camera system is one that delivers images and an experience closest to old school film–which means it’s more than adequate for shooting portraits. In fact, it’s one of the most popular subject matters to shoot amongst the Fujifilm X series community of photographers. With a variety of lenses, film emulsion simulations, and cameras at your disposal, it’s incredibly simple to take a great portrait. What the system is surely missing though is a great third party flash solution.

In this post, we’re going to take a look at some of the best things about the system for portrait photographers.

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How to Create More Visually Interesting Street Photography

You’ve got the same fear so many others have had: being way too afraid to take photos of people candidly on the street. I mean, what if they get angry and blow up on you? The good news is that it’s not the end of the world and what you’ll realize is that moment is so small and fleeting it won’t really matter. Nor will it weigh heavily on your mind later on. Once you get over this though, know that you now have to go beyond just pressing the shutter. Weird, right? 😉

Here are a few tips on how you can go about creating more visually interesting street photography.

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The Beginner’s Guide to Shooting Photos With a Flash and Gels

If you’ve been a strobist for a while, you’ve probably considered working with gels in some way or another. Gels are little pieces of plastic that go onto the front of your camera flash or strobe and add some sort of extra color to the output. They’re used very creatively to give a bit more pizzaz to a photo. Lots of photographers use them once they learn to understand how they work–and many of them tend to use them with multiple flashes to get unique looks that can’t really be made any other way.

So if you want to work with gels, here’s how.

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