These Are the Winners of the World Press Photo 2016 Awards

Migrants crossing the border from Serbia into Hungary. World Press Photo Winning Image from Australian photographer Warren Richardson

Migrants crossing the border from Serbia into Hungary.
World Press Photo Winning Image from Australian photographer Warren Richardson

Today, the winners of the  World Press Photo Awards are being announced. The winner is Warren Richardson who is a freelance photographer, currently based in Budapest, Hungary. He explained how the picture was made:

“I camped with the refugees for five days on the border. A group of about 200 people arrived, and they moved under the trees along the fence line. They sent women and children, then fathers and elderly men first. I must have been with this crew for about five hours and we played cat and mouse with the police the whole night. I was exhausted by the time I took the picture. It was around three o’clock in the morning and you can’t use a flash while the police are trying to find these people, because I would just give them away. So I had to use the moonlight alone.”

More of the winners are after the jump.

© Zohreh Saberi - Into the Light

© Zohreh Saberi – Into the Light

© Zhang Lei - Haze in China

Любительский хоккей в российской глубинке Болельщик высказывает претензии игрокам любительского ХК "Ветлуга" в перерыве матча против команды посёлка Тоншаево, город Ветлуга Нижегородской области

Любительский хоккей в российской глубинке
Болельщик высказывает претензии игрокам любительского ХК “Ветлуга” в перерыве матча против команды посёлка Тоншаево, город Ветлуга Нижегородской области

Любительский хоккей в российской глубинке Матч между юниорскими любительскими командами города Ветлуга и посёлка Шаранга, город Ветлуга Нижегородской области

Любительский хоккей в российской глубинке
Матч между юниорскими любительскими командами города Ветлуга и посёлка Шаранга, город Ветлуга Нижегородской области

Любительский хоккей в российской глубинке Матч между юниорскими любительскими командами города Ветлуга и посёлка Шаранга, город Ветлуга Нижегородской области

Любительский хоккей в российской глубинке
Матч между юниорскими любительскими командами города Ветлуга и посёлка Шаранга, город Ветлуга Нижегородской области

Любительский хоккей в российской глубинке Подготовка стадиона любительского ХК "Ветлуга" к матчам, город Ветлуга Нижегородской области

Любительский хоккей в российской глубинке
Подготовка стадиона любительского ХК “Ветлуга” к матчам, город Ветлуга Нижегородской области

"Rescue" of a five month old male baby orangutan from captivity in Sungai Besar village by the BKSDA (Department of Wildlife and Nature Conservation) staff and wildlife veteranarian Dr. Ayu from International Animal Rescue.

“Rescue” of a five month old male baby orangutan from captivity in Sungai Besar village by the BKSDA (Department of Wildlife and Nature Conservation) staff and wildlife veteranarian Dr. Ayu from International Animal Rescue.

Unflanged male orangutan in a strip of remaining forest along the edge of the Mangkutup River, seen through the smoke of forest fires. Forest away from the river has burned. Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii Central Kalimantan Province, Indonesia Island of Borneo

Unflanged male orangutan in a strip of remaining forest along the edge of the Mangkutup River, seen through the smoke of forest fires. Forest away from the river has burned.
Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii
Central Kalimantan Province, Indonesia
Island of Borneo

DCIM101GOPROG0051611.

DCIM101GOPROG0051611.

Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii) Batang Toru Population Unidentified unflanged adult male making threatening display towards, Togus, the resident adult flanged male Batang Toru Forest Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Project North Sumatran Province Indonesia

Sumatran Orangutan
(Pongo abelii)
Batang Toru Population
Unidentified unflanged adult male making threatening display towards, Togus, the resident adult flanged male
Batang Toru Forest
Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Project
North Sumatran Province
Indonesia

© Tara Todras-Whitehill - Ebola Survivors Football Club 04

Bandu Turay, second to top row, fourth from right, watches her son Erison, not pictured, play soccer as others cheer for the Ebola Survivor's Soccer Club, on a field near their house, in the city of Kenema, 190 miles east of the capital Freetown, Sierra Leone, Tuesday, April 21, 2015. Last year, 38 members of Erison's family died from the deadly Ebola virus, which has killed over 11,000 across West Africa. Erison founded the Ebola Survivor's Soccer Club as a support network for survivors and a means to battle negative stigmas in the community. (Photo Credit/Tara Todras-Whitehill for the New York Times)

Bandu Turay, second to top row, fourth from right, watches her son Erison, not pictured, play soccer as others cheer for the Ebola Survivor’s Soccer Club, on a field near their house, in the city of Kenema, 190 miles east of the capital Freetown, Sierra Leone, Tuesday, April 21, 2015. Last year, 38 members of Erison’s family died from the deadly Ebola virus, which has killed over 11,000 across West Africa. Erison founded the Ebola Survivor’s Soccer Club as a support network for survivors and a means to battle negative stigmas in the community. (Photo Credit/Tara Todras-Whitehill for the New York Times)

© Tara Todras-Whitehill - Ebola Survivors Football Club 02

Erison Turay, walks to the soccer pitch to practice with the Ebola Survivor's Soccer Club, near his house, in the city of Kenema, 190 miles east of the capital Freetown, Sierra Leone, Tuesday, April 21, 2015. Last year, 38 members of Erison's family died from the deadly Ebola virus, which has killed over 11,000 across West Africa. Erison founded the Ebola Survivor's Soccer Club as a support network for survivors and a means to battle negative stigmas in the community. (Photo Credit/Tara Todras-Whitehill for the New York Times)

Erison Turay, walks to the soccer pitch to practice with the Ebola Survivor’s Soccer Club, near his house, in the city of Kenema, 190 miles east of the capital Freetown, Sierra Leone, Tuesday, April 21, 2015. Last year, 38 members of Erison’s family died from the deadly Ebola virus, which has killed over 11,000 across West Africa. Erison founded the Ebola Survivor’s Soccer Club as a support network for survivors and a means to battle negative stigmas in the community. (Photo Credit/Tara Todras-Whitehill for the New York Times)

Colima Volcano in Mexico shows a powerful night explosion with lightning, ballystics and some incandescent rockfalls. Photo taken on dec. 13 at 22:24 hours, 12.5 km away from the crater near a lagoon named Carrizalillos on Comala municipality in the state of Colima. Colima Volcano had a period of enormous activity on july of 2015, at least 700 inhabitants were evacuated from their settlements. The volcano mantains activity with 3 to 6 explosions by day. Lightning on Colima Volcano explosions became common on last months. This particular lightning is more than 600 meters long, so the big light made clear some details of the south portion of volcano. It's an 8 seconds shot, time enough to catch the explosion and the lightning. Photo: Sergio Velasco

Colima Volcano in Mexico shows a powerful night explosion with lightning, ballystics and some incandescent rockfalls. Photo taken on dec. 13 at 22:24 hours, 12.5 km away from the crater near a lagoon named Carrizalillos on Comala municipality in the state of Colima.
Colima Volcano had a period of enormous activity on july of 2015, at least 700 inhabitants were evacuated from their settlements. The volcano mantains activity with 3 to 6 explosions by day.
Lightning on Colima Volcano explosions became common on last months. This particular lightning is more than 600 meters long, so the big light made clear some details of the south portion of volcano. It’s an 8 seconds shot, time enough to catch the explosion and the lightning.
Photo: Sergio Velasco

8 - Migrants walked atop a dike as Slovenian riot police escorted them to a registration camp outside Dobova. War, drought and more are driving millions of people from their homelands.

8 – Migrants walked atop a dike as Slovenian riot police escorted them to a registration camp outside Dobova. War, drought and more are driving millions of people from their homelands.

7 - A Slovenian police officer on horseback escorted migrants after they crossed from Croatia.

7 – A Slovenian police officer on horseback escorted migrants after they crossed from Croatia.

3 – Migrants struggled to climb onto a train headed to Zagreb, the Croatian capital.

3 – Migrants struggled to climb onto a train headed to Zagreb, the Croatian capital.

1 - Migrants and refugees arrived by boat in November near the village of Skala on the Greek island of Lesbos. Under Europe’s system of open internal borders, the island’s thinly patrolled, easily accessible coastline, within sight of the Turkish coast, might as well be the frontier of France or Germany or Sweden.

1 – Migrants and refugees arrived by boat in November near the village of Skala on the Greek island of Lesbos. Under Europe’s system of open internal borders, the island’s thinly patrolled, easily accessible coastline, within sight of the Turkish coast, might as well be the frontier of France or Germany or Sweden.

February 2015 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Cops patrolling the streets of Vila Aliança, a favela near Complexo do Alemao. After a militar police cop kill the mototaxi driver Diego da Costa Algavez (22) in the streets of the favela, several cars and high caliber armed cops invaded the streets in alert of a possible confrontation with the gangs and from the population.

February 2015 – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Cops patrolling the streets of Vila Aliança, a favela near Complexo do Alemao. After a militar police cop kill the mototaxi driver Diego da Costa Algavez (22) in the streets of the favela, several cars and high caliber armed cops invaded the streets in alert of a possible confrontation with the gangs and from the population.

February 2015 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Papo Reto collective members taking pictures and recording videos of the Special Police Forces (BOPE) tank-car patrolling in the streets of Vila Aliança, a favela near Complexo do Alemao. After a militar police cop kill a mototaxi driver in the streets of the favela, several cars and high caliber armed cops invaded the streets in alert of a possible confrontation with the gangs and from the population.

February 2015 – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Papo Reto collective members taking pictures and recording videos of the Special Police Forces (BOPE) tank-car patrolling in the streets of Vila Aliança, a favela near Complexo do Alemao. After a militar police cop kill a mototaxi driver in the streets of the favela, several cars and high caliber armed cops invaded the streets in alert of a possible confrontation with the gangs and from the population.

February 2015 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Raul, the leader of Papo Reto collective, just receive an image of the mototaxi driver Diego da Costa Algavez (22), who was shoot to died by a cop in a near favela. They received a message at the collective WhatsApp and inmeditely their shared on their social media, including Facebook, Instragram and Facebook, to alert the local population and be aware that it will be dangerous to walk around that area and also the keep the community well informed. Inmediately they change their path and go straight to the place where a driver died.

February 2015 – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Raul, the leader of Papo Reto collective, just receive an image of the mototaxi driver Diego da Costa Algavez (22), who was shoot to died by a cop in a near favela. They received a message at the collective WhatsApp and inmeditely their shared on their social media, including Facebook, Instragram and Facebook, to alert the local population and be aware that it will be dangerous to walk around that area and also the keep the community well informed. Inmediately they change their path and go straight to the place where a driver died.

February 2015 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Papo Reto collective members at Complexo do Alemao with a cableway station and cab in their back.

February 2015 – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Papo Reto collective members at Complexo do Alemao with a cableway station and cab in their back.

Emily rubbed sleep out of her eyes while feeding Reid, as Kate held Eddie during a late night feeding. The two shared the responsibilities of late night feedings, but because Emily generally produced more breast milk than Kate, she often had to feed both babies while Kate pumped her milk.

Emily rubbed sleep out of her eyes while feeding Reid, as Kate held Eddie during a late night feeding. The two shared the responsibilities of late night feedings, but because Emily generally produced more breast milk than Kate, she often had to feed both babies while Kate pumped her milk.

Emily held Reid up to meet his new little brother. Reid and Eddie were born only four days apart, despite being due three weeks apart. Both babies had the same donor, making them biological half-brothers. “Oh my God,” Kate said, “we’re…like…a family suddenly!”

Emily held Reid up to meet his new little brother. Reid and Eddie were born only four days apart, despite being due three weeks apart. Both babies had the same donor, making them biological half-brothers. “Oh my God,” Kate said, “we’re…like…a family suddenly!”

Emily watched as the nurses worked to get Eddie to wake up and cry. The baby didn't cry immediately after being born, as his umbilical cord was tight and he was born "in distress." "It was one of the scariest moments of my life," Emily said later.

Emily watched as the nurses worked to get Eddie to wake up and cry. The baby didn’t cry immediately after being born, as his umbilical cord was tight and he was born “in distress.” “It was one of the scariest moments of my life,” Emily said later.

Kate often kept Emily company while she took baths. Late in the pregnancy, particularly once Emily was overdue, she said that baths were one of the easiest ways to relax her body. Kate, who became pregnant three weeks later than Emily, showed less, and the two would often compare their baby bumps and talk to each other’s bellies.

Kate often kept Emily company while she took baths. Late in the pregnancy, particularly once Emily was overdue, she said that baths were one of the easiest ways to relax her body. Kate, who became pregnant three weeks later than Emily, showed less, and the two would often compare their baby bumps and talk to each other’s bellies.

A view of the Syrian town of Douma in the eastern Ghouta region, a rebel stronghold east of the capital Damascus, following air strikes on December 13, 2015. At least 28 civilians were killed in heavy bombardment of the besieged Syrian rebel stronghold, including near a school, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. AFP PHOTO / SAMEER AL-DOUMY

A view of the Syrian town of Douma in the eastern Ghouta region, a rebel stronghold east of the capital Damascus, following air strikes on December 13, 2015. At least 28 civilians were killed in heavy bombardment of the besieged Syrian rebel stronghold, including near a school, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. AFP PHOTO / SAMEER AL-DOUMY

A wounded man walks out of a dust cloud following reported airstrikes in the town of Hamouria in the eastern Ghouta region, a rebel stronghold east of the Syrian capital Damascus, on December 9, 2015. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported at least 11 civilians, including four children, were killed in strikes on the town of Hamouria, but said it was unclear if they were carried out by Russian or regime aircraft. AFP PHOTO / SAMEER AL-DOUMY

A wounded man walks out of a dust cloud following reported airstrikes in the town of Hamouria in the eastern Ghouta region, a rebel stronghold east of the Syrian capital Damascus, on December 9, 2015. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported at least 11 civilians, including four children, were killed in strikes on the town of Hamouria, but said it was unclear if they were carried out by Russian or regime aircraft. AFP PHOTO / SAMEER AL-DOUMY

Syrians evacuate an injured boy from rubble following a reported air strike on a rebel-held town of Douma, northeast of the capital Damascus on June 16, 2015. Nearly every day, Syria's air force drops barrel bombs -- containers packed with crude explosives and shrapnel -- on areas wrested from government control by rebels. AFP PHOTO / SAMEER AL-DOUMY

Syrians evacuate an injured boy from rubble following a reported air strike on a rebel-held town of Douma, northeast of the capital Damascus on June 16, 2015. Nearly every day, Syria’s air force drops barrel bombs — containers packed with crude explosives and shrapnel — on areas wrested from government control by rebels. AFP PHOTO / SAMEER AL-DOUMY

Smoke billows from a building early on October 30, 2015, following reported shelling by Syrian government forces in the rebel-controlled area of Douma, east of Damascus. AFP PHOTO / SAMEER AL-DOUMY

Smoke billows from a building early on October 30, 2015, following reported shelling by Syrian government forces in the rebel-controlled area of Douma, east of Damascus. AFP PHOTO / SAMEER AL-DOUMY

Sunbather oblivious to the ominous shelf cloud approaching - on Bondi beach. A massive “cloud tsunami” looms over Sydney in a spectacular weather event seen only a few times a year. The enormous shelf cloud rolled in from the sea, turning the sky almost black and bringing violent thunderstorms in its wake.

Sunbather oblivious to the ominous shelf cloud approaching – on Bondi beach. A massive “cloud tsunami” looms over Sydney in a spectacular weather event seen only a few times a year.
The enormous shelf cloud rolled in from the sea, turning the sky almost black and bringing violent thunderstorms in its wake.

Rescuers carry an injured person to a medical tent moments after a wall of rock, snow and debris slammed into Everest Base Camp on April 25, 2015 killing at least 22 people. The avalanche was triggered by a powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people in the country. Rescue helicopters managed to reach the site about 18 hours after the avalanche as bad weather, aftershocks and fears of further avalanches rattled survivors. At the time of the disaster, the 5,364-meter-high Base Camp was teeming with hundreds of climbers and supporting teams who use the base to prepare their ascent to the peak of Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth.

Rescuers carry an injured person to a medical tent moments after a wall of rock, snow and debris slammed into Everest Base Camp on April 25, 2015 killing at least 22 people. The avalanche was triggered by a powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people in the country. Rescue helicopters managed to reach the site about 18 hours after the avalanche as bad weather, aftershocks and fears of further avalanches rattled survivors. At the time of the disaster, the 5,364-meter-high Base Camp was teeming with hundreds of climbers and supporting teams who use the base to prepare their ascent to the peak of Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth.

A man who suffered head trauma is bundled in a sleeping bag used as a makeshift stretcher as he was being taken by rescuers to a medical tent moments after a wall of rock, snow and debris slammed on Everest base camp on April 25, 2015 killing at least 22 people. The avalanche was triggered by a powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people in the country. Rescue helicopters managed to reach the site about 18 hours after the avalanche as bad weather, aftershocks and fears of further avalanches rattled survivors. At the time of the disaster, the 5,364-meter-high Base Camp was teeming with hundreds of climbers and supporting teams who use the base to prepare their ascent to the peak of Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth.

A man who suffered head trauma is bundled in a sleeping bag used as a makeshift stretcher as he was being taken by rescuers to a medical tent moments after a wall of rock, snow and debris slammed on Everest base camp on April 25, 2015 killing at least 22 people. The avalanche was triggered by a powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people in the country. Rescue helicopters managed to reach the site about 18 hours after the avalanche as bad weather, aftershocks and fears of further avalanches rattled survivors. At the time of the disaster, the 5,364-meter-high Base Camp was teeming with hundreds of climbers and supporting teams who use the base to prepare their ascent to the peak of Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth.

Trekking guide Pasang Sherpa searches for survivors among flattened tents moments after a wall of rock, snow and debris slammed on Everest base camp on April 25, 2015 killing at least 22 people. The avalanche was triggered by a powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people in the country. Rescue helicopters managed to reach the site about 18 hours after the avalanche as bad weather, aftershocks and fears of further avalanches rattled survivors. At the time of the disaster, the 5,364-meter-high Base Camp was teeming with hundreds of climbers and supporting teams who use the base to prepare their ascent to the peak of Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth.

Trekking guide Pasang Sherpa searches for survivors among flattened tents moments after a wall of rock, snow and debris slammed on Everest base camp on April 25, 2015 killing at least 22 people. The avalanche was triggered by a powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people in the country. Rescue helicopters managed to reach the site about 18 hours after the avalanche as bad weather, aftershocks and fears of further avalanches rattled survivors. At the time of the disaster, the 5,364-meter-high Base Camp was teeming with hundreds of climbers and supporting teams who use the base to prepare their ascent to the peak of Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth.

A wall of rock, snow and debris roars toward Everest Base Camp in Nepal before slamming into to the southern part of the camp at midday on April 25, 2015, killing at least 22 people. The avalanche was triggered by a powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people in the country. Rescue helicopters managed to reach the site about 18 hours after the avalanche as bad weather, aftershocks and fears of further avalanches rattled survivors. At the time of the disaster, the 5,364-meter-high Base Camp was teeming with hundreds of climbers and supporting teams who use the base to prepare their ascent to the peak of Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth.

A wall of rock, snow and debris roars toward Everest Base Camp in Nepal before slamming into to the southern part of the camp at midday on April 25, 2015, killing at least 22 people. The avalanche was triggered by a powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people in the country. Rescue helicopters managed to reach the site about 18 hours after the avalanche as bad weather, aftershocks and fears of further avalanches rattled survivors. At the time of the disaster, the 5,364-meter-high Base Camp was teeming with hundreds of climbers and supporting teams who use the base to prepare their ascent to the peak of Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth.

Krigen och osäkerheten, framförallt i mellanöstern tvingar alltfler på flykt mot säkerheten i Europa. Innan november var slut passerade antalet asylsökande som anlände 1 miljon. En fjärdedel av flyktingarna är Syrier. Samtidigt som skyddsbehoven ökar stängs alltfler dörrar. Sedan Turkiet fått 27 miljarder kronor av EU patrullerar den turkiska kustbevakningen allt oftare. I praktiken går den svenska gränsen här, i vattnet mellan Grekland och Turkiet. För att undvika upptäckt och att fängslas i Turkiet tar sig alltfler båtar över under skydd av mörkret. Frivilliga hjälparbetare möter de ofta nedkylda flyktingarna på den grekiska ön Lesbos

Krigen och osäkerheten, framförallt i mellanöstern tvingar alltfler på flykt mot säkerheten i Europa.
Innan november var slut passerade antalet asylsökande som anlände 1 miljon. En fjärdedel av flyktingarna är Syrier. Samtidigt som skyddsbehoven ökar stängs alltfler dörrar. Sedan Turkiet fått 27 miljarder kronor av EU patrullerar den turkiska kustbevakningen allt oftare. I praktiken går den svenska gränsen här, i vattnet mellan Grekland och Turkiet.
För att undvika upptäckt och att fängslas i Turkiet tar sig alltfler båtar över under skydd av mörkret. Frivilliga hjälparbetare möter de ofta nedkylda flyktingarna på den grekiska ön Lesbos

San Pedro Sula, Honduras He became the fourth victim on the same street that night. The rival 18th Street gang surprised their enemies MS13 and shot them dead. Police have no witnesses to the event and probably the murder will never be solved.

San Pedro Sula, Honduras
He became the fourth victim on the same street that night. The rival 18th Street gang surprised their enemies MS13 and shot them dead. Police have no witnesses to the event and probably the murder will never be solved.

The house needed to be packed up and cleared out if the Borowick kids were hoping to sell it and close the chapter. Thousands of photographs were uncovered from every corner of the home, reflecting a lifetime of memories that they will hold onto forever. Chappaqua, NY. February, 2015.

The house needed to be packed up and cleared out if the Borowick kids were hoping to sell it and close the chapter. Thousands of photographs were uncovered from every corner of the home, reflecting a lifetime of memories that they will hold onto forever. Chappaqua, NY. February, 2015.

During shiva, all eyes are on the Borowick kids, and the community bands together to provide love and support for these “adult orphans” as the rabbi puts it. Focus is also on Marion, center, Laurel’s 87-year-old mother, who has just lost her daughter. Chappaqua, NY. December 2014.

During shiva, all eyes are on the Borowick kids, and the community bands together to provide love and support for these “adult orphans” as the rabbi puts it. Focus is also on Marion, center, Laurel’s 87-year-old mother, who has just lost her daughter. Chappaqua, NY. December 2014.

Laurel struggles to breathe as her tumors steadily grow as she is no longer in treatment and has begun home hospice care. An oxygen machine is now a permanent fixture in the home. Chappaqua, NY. November 2014.

Laurel struggles to breathe as her tumors steadily grow as she is no longer in treatment and has begun home hospice care. An oxygen machine is now a permanent fixture in the home. Chappaqua, NY. November 2014.

This morning was different from all of the others. Laurel could barely get out of bed and was no longer speaking in anything but a low whisper. Matthew, her son, gave her a kiss on the forehead but there was little resopnse. Chappaqua, NY. December 2014.

This morning was different from all of the others. Laurel could barely get out of bed and was no longer speaking in anything but a low whisper. Matthew, her son, gave her a kiss on the forehead but there was little resopnse. Chappaqua, NY. December 2014.

Having cancer for so long has put death on the radar of both Howie and Laurel Borowick so its no surprise that they have begun to plan for their funerals. Anything they could do to make the process easier for their children they would try. Chappaqua, New York. March, 2013.

Having cancer for so long has put death on the radar of both Howie and Laurel Borowick so its no surprise that they have begun to plan for their funerals. Anything they could do to make the process easier for their children they would try. Chappaqua, New York. March, 2013.

Howie and Laurel Borowick sit next to the bathroom telephone as they hear the most recent news from their oncologist- good scans for both of them, and their respective tumors are shrinking. What if one got good news and one got bad? Do they celebrate for themselves and mourn for the other?Chappaqua, New York. March 2013.

Howie and Laurel Borowick sit next to the bathroom telephone as they hear the most recent news from their oncologist- good scans for both of them, and their respective tumors are shrinking. What if one got good news and one got bad? Do they celebrate for themselves and mourn for the other?Chappaqua, New York. March 2013.

Howie and Laurel Borowick embrace in the bedroom of their home. In their thirty-four year marriage, they never could have imagined being diagnosed with stage-4 cancer at the same time. Chappaqua, New York. March 2013.

Howie and Laurel Borowick embrace in the bedroom of their home. In their thirty-four year marriage, they never could have imagined being diagnosed with stage-4 cancer at the same time. Chappaqua, New York. March 2013.

Howie calls these “his and hers” chairs. He sits beside Laurel, his wife of thirty-four years, as they get their weekly chemotherapy treatments, side by side at Oncologist Dr. Barry Boyd’s office. Greenwich, Connecticut. January, 2013.

Howie calls these “his and hers” chairs. He sits beside Laurel, his wife of thirty-four years, as they get their weekly chemotherapy treatments, side by side at Oncologist Dr. Barry Boyd’s office. Greenwich, Connecticut. January, 2013.

Arzuma Tindano (28) leads an eight-member crew of miners at Djuga, an artisanal mine in north-eastern Burkina Faso. They all trust him. They believe in his strength and his judgment. His 'office' is a 20 meters deep, narrow, dangerous and claustrophobic pit. The air there is thick, hot and humid with constant dust atacking his longs. He is just about to go into his pit again to do his night shift after he finishes his cigarete. Working in the night is better, he says, because the air is a bit cooler.

Arzuma Tindano (28) leads an eight-member crew of miners at Djuga, an artisanal mine in north-eastern Burkina Faso. They all trust him. They believe in his strength and his judgment.
His ‘office’ is a 20 meters deep, narrow, dangerous and claustrophobic pit. The air there is thick, hot and humid with constant dust atacking his longs. He is just about to go into his pit again to do his night shift after he finishes his cigarete. Working in the night is better, he says, because the air is a bit cooler.

PRESEVO, SERBIA - OCTOBER 7, 2015: A child refugee is covered with raincoat while she waits in line to get registered in Presevo refugee registration camp. Most of the refugees who crossed Serbia try to continue their route towards Hungary, Croatia, Slovenia and other countries of the European Union.

PRESEVO, SERBIA – OCTOBER 7, 2015: A child refugee is covered with raincoat while she waits in line to get registered in Presevo refugee registration camp. Most of the refugees who crossed Serbia try to continue their route towards Hungary, Croatia, Slovenia and other countries of the European Union.

US Army veteran Wilma M. Herndon, watches TV in her room at the Mary Walker House for homeless women veterans in Coatesville, PA. She was married to another soldier who beat and sexually assaulted her. Wilma confided in her 1st Sergeant who did nothing to stop her abuser so she turned to drugs and drinking to feel better. Thus beginning her downward spiral to homelessness.

US Army veteran Wilma M. Herndon, watches TV in her room at the Mary Walker House for homeless women veterans in Coatesville, PA. She was married to another soldier who beat and sexually assaulted her. Wilma confided in her 1st Sergeant who did nothing to stop her abuser so she turned to drugs and drinking to feel better. Thus beginning her downward spiral to homelessness.

Debra Filter joined the US Army in 1978 and went through boot camp at Fort Ord, Georgia. In those days, the women trained just like the men did. Her drill sergeants were Viet Nam vets and "wanted to make sure all the recruits felt a piece of Viet Nam. A lot of it was a "Full Metal Jacket" experience," she says. Debra and several other women recruits were raped at the party they were forced to attend upon graduation. "We didn't realize it was for women and that a great many of us were going to be raped." "I wanted to make the military my career. Rape stopped my career, stopped any dreams I ever had." Her PTSD festered and Debra eventually left the military with an honorable discharge. Though educated with a Masters Degree, she has been homeless for 10 years and has battled the VA for benefits for 30 years. She left Las Vegas when the VA pulled her benefits. Debra thinks it was in retaliation for her homeless activism. She says the teardrop tattoo under her eye is a symbol of how the VA tried to kill her. She has been in and out of shelters in LA and now has a housing voucher for a studio apartment in Korea-town in Los Angeles, CA.

Debra Filter joined the US Army in 1978 and went through boot camp at Fort Ord, Georgia. In those days, the women trained just like the men did. Her drill sergeants were Viet Nam vets and “wanted to make sure all the recruits felt a piece of Viet Nam. A lot of it was a “Full Metal Jacket” experience,” she says. Debra and several other women recruits were raped at the party they were forced to attend upon graduation. “We didn’t realize it was for women and that a great many of us were going to be raped.” “I wanted to make the military my career. Rape stopped my career, stopped any dreams I ever had.” Her PTSD festered and Debra eventually left the military with an honorable discharge. Though educated with a Masters Degree, she has been homeless for 10 years and has battled the VA for benefits for 30 years. She left Las Vegas when the VA pulled her benefits. Debra thinks it was in retaliation for her homeless activism. She says the teardrop tattoo under her eye is a symbol of how the VA tried to kill her. She has been in and out of shelters in LA and now has a housing voucher for a studio apartment in Korea-town in Los Angeles, CA.

Homeless veteran Darlene Matthews has been living in her car for over two years while she waits for a housing voucher from the VA. She joined the US Army in 1976 and was sent to Fort McLellan, Alabama. "I was going to join this all women's army and there would be no sexual problems but I joined and there were sexual problems." She was beyond horrified when she discovered that it wasn't a safe place and instead full of "illegal punishments and all this sexual stuff. The whole atmosphere was abusive." Her life spiraled down after she got out of the military and found herself very depressed. She joined the military to escape a chaotic abusive home life and was forced back into it when she was discharged. She has been fighting with the VA for benefits including housing vouchers but has been living in her car in the parking lot of a mortuary next to a graveyard. "It's like being in a fun house and every door gets slammed in your face every time you try to leave. I feel like giving up sometimes, and nobody would care."

Homeless veteran Darlene Matthews has been living in her car for over two years while she waits for a housing voucher from the VA. She joined the US Army in 1976 and was sent to Fort McLellan, Alabama. “I was going to join this all women’s army and there would be no sexual problems but I joined and there were sexual problems.” She was beyond horrified when she discovered that it wasn’t a safe place and instead full of “illegal punishments and all this sexual stuff. The whole atmosphere was abusive.” Her life spiraled down after she got out of the military and found herself very depressed. She joined the military to escape a chaotic abusive home life and was forced back into it when she was discharged. She has been fighting with the VA for benefits including housing vouchers but has been living in her car in the parking lot of a mortuary next to a graveyard. “It’s like being in a fun house and every door gets slammed in your face every time you try to leave. I feel like giving up sometimes, and nobody would care.”

Gary Noling holds his daughter Carrie's journal on the anniversary of her suicide in Alliance, Ohio. Carrie Goodwin suffered severe retaliation after reporting her rape to her US Marine commanders. Five days after she was went home with a bad conduct discharge, she drank herself to death. "it destroyed my family. When Carrie died i lost all three of my kids and my grandkids. I lost two thirds of me. Two thirds of me is in that box of ashes." He did not know she had been raped until after her death.

Gary Noling holds his daughter Carrie’s journal on the anniversary of her suicide in Alliance, Ohio. Carrie Goodwin suffered severe retaliation after reporting her rape to her US Marine commanders. Five days after she was went home with a bad conduct discharge, she drank herself to death. “it destroyed my family. When Carrie died i lost all three of my kids and my grandkids. I lost two thirds of me. Two thirds of me is in that box of ashes.” He did not know she had been raped until after her death.

Under cover of darkness, US Navy sailor Melissa Bania, holds a banner inscribed with the story of her rape before hanging it on the footbridge across from Naval Station San Diego. Military Sexual Trauma survivors gathered in San Diego to bring attention to the epidemic of rape in America’s military.

Under cover of darkness, US Navy sailor Melissa Bania, holds a banner inscribed with the story of her rape before hanging it on the footbridge across from Naval Station San Diego. Military Sexual Trauma survivors gathered in San Diego to bring attention to the epidemic of rape in America’s military.

Elisha Morrow and Tiffany Berkland were sexually harassed by the same company commander when they were in basic training after joining the Coast Guard. Elisha thought about faking a suicide attempt to get away from him; "he haunts your person by day and your dreams at night."They did not report the harassment for fear of being kicked out but came forward when they met a third victim. When their case went to trial, they met a fourth young woman who had been raped recently by the same company commander. Berkland and Morrow are guilt ridden for not coming forward sooner. They sit in their hotel room after attending the Truth and Justice Summit on MST in Washington, D.C.

Elisha Morrow and Tiffany Berkland were sexually harassed by the same company commander when they were in basic training after joining the Coast Guard. Elisha thought about faking a suicide attempt to get away from him; “he haunts your person by day and your dreams at night.”They did not report the harassment for fear of being kicked out but came forward when they met a third victim. When their case went to trial, they met a fourth young woman who had been raped recently by the same company commander. Berkland and Morrow are guilt ridden for not coming forward sooner. They sit in their hotel room after attending the Truth and Justice Summit on MST in Washington, D.C.

Connie Sue Foss went to sleep after a Christmas party at her National Guard unit. When she awoke, she was tied down and a fellow guardsman had his hands around her throat as he raped her. “Don’t bother screaming, there’s only me in the building,” he said. She retreats into her own thoughts while her daughter hovers near the bathroom door of their apartment in Spring Hill, Florida.

Connie Sue Foss went to sleep after a Christmas party at her National Guard unit. When she awoke, she was tied down and a fellow guardsman had his hands around her throat as he raped her. “Don’t bother screaming, there’s only me in the building,” he said. She retreats into her own thoughts while her daughter hovers near the bathroom door of their apartment in Spring Hill, Florida.

US Army Spc. Natasha Schuette, 21, was pressured not to report being assaulted by her drill sergeant during basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. Though she was hazed by her assailant’s fellow drill instructors, she refused to back down and Staff Sgt. Louis Corral is now serving four years in prison for assaulting her and four other female trainees. The US Army rewarded Natasha for her courage to report her assault and the Sexual Harassment/ Assault Response & Prevention office distributed a training video featuring her story. She is now stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

US Army Spc. Natasha Schuette, 21, was pressured not to report being assaulted by her drill sergeant during basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. Though she was hazed by her assailant’s fellow drill instructors, she refused to back down and Staff Sgt. Louis Corral is now serving four years in prison for assaulting her and four other female trainees. The US Army rewarded Natasha for her courage to report her assault and the Sexual Harassment/ Assault Response & Prevention office distributed a training video featuring her story. She is now stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Children that used to be talibes cool off at SOS Talibe Center in Bafata, Guinea-Bissau, June 8, 2015. The Center received 45 cases of talibes returning from Senegal in 2014, some of them ran away from the daaras but others were handed over by the marabouts to the authorities when some of them were brought to the courts.

Children that used to be talibes cool off at SOS Talibe Center in Bafata, Guinea-Bissau, June 8, 2015. The Center received 45 cases of talibes returning from Senegal in 2014, some of them ran away from the daaras but others were handed over by the marabouts to the authorities when some of them were brought to the courts.

Talibes sleep together inside a daara in Saint Louis, north of Senegal, May 21, 2015. The daara with over 30 children has no clean water and barely no electricity. Children sleep on the concrete floor without any protection.

Talibes sleep together inside a daara in Saint Louis, north of Senegal, May 21, 2015. The daara with over 30 children has no clean water and barely no electricity. Children sleep on the concrete floor without any protection.

Runaway talibes stand on the bank of Senegal river, in Saint Louis city, north of Senegal, May 20, 2015. Saint Louis is known as Talibe city. A city with small proportions compared to Dakar but with a large number of Talibes. Due to that many of them choose the streets instead of Daaras.

Runaway talibes stand on the bank of Senegal river, in Saint Louis city, north of Senegal, May 20, 2015. Saint Louis is known as Talibe city. A city with small proportions compared to Dakar but with a large number of Talibes. Due to that many of them choose the streets instead of Daaras.

Abdoulaye, 15, imprisoned in one room of a daara in the Diamaguene area, city of Thies, Senegal, May 18, 2015. The rooms have windows with security bars to keep the talibes from running away.

Abdoulaye, 15, imprisoned in one room of a daara in the Diamaguene area, city of Thies, Senegal, May 18, 2015. The rooms have windows with security bars to keep the talibes from running away.

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"Recently, I just realised that I was not guilty. This is nobody's fault. I'm working on it, and everything is much better. I understand that all the worst is over, and now I'm trying to reestablish contact with my parents. They thought that I grew up very strong and independent. But it is not so. Now it’s like I just came back to life and I'm a child again. It’s interesting for me to touch, feel, play, go on a picnic. I just learned how to ride a bike this year."

“Recently, I just realised that I was not guilty. This is nobody’s fault. I’m working on it, and everything is much better. I understand that all the worst is over, and now I’m trying to reestablish contact with my parents. They thought that I grew up very strong and independent. But it is not so.
Now it’s like I just came back to life and I’m a child again. It’s interesting for me to touch, feel, play, go on a picnic. I just learned how to ride a bike this year.”

"Symptoms became strong when I was 19 years old. I had a very strong heart beat and it accelerated. A normal rhythm is 60-70 beats per minute. Mine was beating at 120-130 and this caused a very strong tremor in my hands. I was studying to be an architect at the Architectural Department and I realised that the tremors were preventing me from working, preventing me from completing my course. I could not understand the reason. It was very scary because architecture requires special attention, special care, and I could not understand why I was producing bad work. That was something very frightening for me. It was terrible."

“Symptoms became strong when I was 19 years old. I had a very strong heart beat and it accelerated. A normal rhythm is 60-70 beats per minute. Mine was beating at 120-130 and this caused a very strong tremor in my hands. I was studying to be an architect at the Architectural Department and I realised that the tremors were preventing me from working, preventing me from completing my course. I could not understand the reason. It was very scary because architecture requires special attention, special care, and I could not understand why I was producing bad work. That was something very frightening for me. It was terrible.”

"I was born just 5 months after the day of the explosion. I was a very sickly child and I remember feeling like something was wrong, not growing like a normal child. When I was born I was quickly admitted into the intensive care unit. I had cramps and I was very weak. Half of my childhood, I spent in hospital without receiving a diagnosis. I was treated for bronchitis, then pneumonia, and then neuroses."

“I was born just 5 months after the day of the explosion. I was a very sickly child and I remember feeling like something was wrong, not growing like a normal child. When I was born I was quickly admitted into the intensive care unit. I had cramps and I was very weak. Half of my childhood, I spent in hospital without receiving a diagnosis. I was treated for bronchitis, then pneumonia, and then neuroses.”

"My mother said that it was a typically quiet day, warm and windy. She and my father opened the window and they felt completely safe on the day of the explosion, the 26th of April 1986."

“My mother said that it was a typically quiet day, warm and windy. She and my father opened the window and they felt completely safe on the day of the explosion, the 26th of April 1986.”

Malmö FF- PSG på Malmö stadion

Malmö FF- PSG på Malmö stadion

Lamon Reccord, left, scolds a police sergeant during a police violence protest and march at State and Randolph streets Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago. (John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune)

Lamon Reccord, left, scolds a police sergeant during a police violence protest and march at State and Randolph streets Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago.
(John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune)

Ron Baker (31) shoots over Nick Zeisloft (2) as Hanner Mosquera-Perea (12) and Rashard Kelly (0) battle for position under basket at the NCAA 2015 Mens Basketball Tournament game with Wichita State vs. Indiana at the CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Nebraska, USA on March 20th of 2015. Greg Nelson executed this photograph without posing any of the subjects.

Ron Baker (31) shoots over Nick Zeisloft (2) as Hanner Mosquera-Perea (12) and Rashard Kelly (0) battle for position under basket at the NCAA 2015 Mens Basketball Tournament game with Wichita State vs. Indiana at the CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Nebraska, USA on March 20th of 2015. Greg Nelson executed this photograph without posing any of the subjects.

Eritrean migrants - the vast majority of the migrants rescued the day before off the Libyan coast in the Mediterranean Sea - gather on the deck of the M.S.F. (Médecins Sans Frontières - Doctors Without Borders) search and rescue ship Bourbon Argos to attend the service celebrated by one of the three priests on board the ship. The Argos is crossing the Mediterranean Sea towards Italy. 3 September 2015. In 2015 the ever-increasing number of migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy vessels towards Europe led to an unprecedented crisis. Nearly 120 thousand people have reached Italy in the first 8 months of the year. While the European governments struggled to deal with the influx, the death toll in the Mediterranean reached record numbers. Early in May the international medical relief organization Médecins Sans Frontières (M.S.F.) joined in the search and rescue operations led in the Mediterranean Sea and launched three ships at different stages: the Phoenix (run by the Migrant Offshore Aid Station), the Bourbon Argos and Dignity.

Eritrean migrants – the vast majority of the migrants rescued the day before off the Libyan coast in the Mediterranean Sea – gather on the deck of the M.S.F. (Médecins Sans Frontières – Doctors Without Borders) search and rescue ship Bourbon Argos to attend the service celebrated by one of the three priests on board the ship. The Argos is crossing the Mediterranean Sea towards Italy. 3 September 2015.
In 2015 the ever-increasing number of migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy vessels towards Europe led to an unprecedented crisis. Nearly 120 thousand people have reached Italy in the first 8 months of the year. While the European governments struggled to deal with the influx, the death toll in the Mediterranean reached record numbers.
Early in May the international medical relief organization Médecins Sans Frontières (M.S.F.) joined in the search and rescue operations led in the Mediterranean Sea and launched three ships at different stages: the Phoenix (run by the Migrant Offshore Aid Station), the Bourbon Argos and Dignity.

After spending two days and two nights sailing on the Mediterranean Sea on the deck of the M.S.F. (Médecins Sans Frontières - Doctors Without Borders) search and rescue ship Bourbon Argos, rescued migrants - still wrapped in their emergency blankets - catch sight of the Italian coast for the first time soon after dawn. 23 August 2015 In 2015 the ever-increasing number of migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy vessels towards Europe led to an unprecedented crisis. Nearly 120 thousand people have reached Italy in the first 8 months of the year. While the European governments struggled to deal with the influx, the death toll in the Mediterranean reached record numbers. Early in May the international medical relief organization Médecins Sans Frontières (M.S.F.) joined in the search and rescue operations led in the Mediterranean Sea and launched three ships at different stages: the Phoenix (run by the Migrant Offshore Aid Station), the Bourbon Argos and Dignity.

After spending two days and two nights sailing on the Mediterranean Sea on the deck of the M.S.F. (Médecins Sans Frontières – Doctors Without Borders) search and rescue ship Bourbon Argos, rescued migrants – still wrapped in their emergency blankets – catch sight of the Italian coast for the first time soon after dawn. 23 August 2015
In 2015 the ever-increasing number of migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy vessels towards Europe led to an unprecedented crisis. Nearly 120 thousand people have reached Italy in the first 8 months of the year. While the European governments struggled to deal with the influx, the death toll in the Mediterranean reached record numbers.
Early in May the international medical relief organization Médecins Sans Frontières (M.S.F.) joined in the search and rescue operations led in the Mediterranean Sea and launched three ships at different stages: the Phoenix (run by the Migrant Offshore Aid Station), the Bourbon Argos and Dignity.

Some of the 95 migrants on board a sinking rubber dinghy frantically climb on board a rigid-hulled inflatable boat (RIB) launched to their rescue by the M.S.F. (Médecins Sans Frontières - Doctors Without Borders) Bourbon Argos search and rescue ship patrolling the Mediterranean Sea. 21 August 2015. In 2015 the ever-increasing number of migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy vessels towards Europe led to an unprecedented crisis. Nearly 120 thousand people have reached Italy in the first 8 months of the year. While the European governments struggled to deal with the influx, the death toll in the Mediterranean reached record numbers. Early in May the international medical relief organization Médecins Sans Frontières (M.S.F.) joined in the search and rescue operations led in the Mediterranean Sea and launched three ships at different stages: the Phoenix (run by the Migrant Offshore Aid Station), the Bourbon Argos and Dignity.

Some of the 95 migrants on board a sinking rubber dinghy frantically climb on board a rigid-hulled inflatable boat (RIB) launched to their rescue by the M.S.F. (Médecins Sans Frontières – Doctors Without Borders) Bourbon Argos search and rescue ship patrolling the Mediterranean Sea. 21 August 2015.
In 2015 the ever-increasing number of migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy vessels towards Europe led to an unprecedented crisis. Nearly 120 thousand people have reached Italy in the first 8 months of the year. While the European governments struggled to deal with the influx, the death toll in the Mediterranean reached record numbers.
Early in May the international medical relief organization Médecins Sans Frontières (M.S.F.) joined in the search and rescue operations led in the Mediterranean Sea and launched three ships at different stages: the Phoenix (run by the Migrant Offshore Aid Station), the Bourbon Argos and Dignity.

An overcrowded rubber dinghy sailed from the Libyan coast is apprached by the M.S.F. (Médecins Sans Frontières - Doctors Without Borders) search and rescue ship Bourbon Argos in the Mediterranean Sea, in international waters. The migrants on board the dinghy in distress have issued an emergency call and are waiting to be rescued. On the horizon, an offshore oil platform just off the Libyan coast. 26 August 2015. In 2015 the ever-increasing number of migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy vessels towards Europe led to an unprecedented crisis. Nearly 120 thousand people have reached Italy in the first 8 months of the year. While the European governments struggled to deal with the influx, the death toll in the Mediterranean reached record numbers. Early in May the international medical relief organization Médecins Sans Frontières (M.S.F.) joined in the search and rescue operations led in the Mediterranean Sea and launched three ships at different stages: the Phoenix (run by the Migrant Offshore Aid Station), the Bourbon Argos and Dignity.

An overcrowded rubber dinghy sailed from the Libyan coast is apprached by the M.S.F. (Médecins Sans Frontières – Doctors Without Borders) search and rescue ship Bourbon Argos in the Mediterranean Sea, in international waters. The migrants on board the dinghy in distress have issued an emergency call and are waiting to be rescued. On the horizon, an offshore oil platform just off the Libyan coast. 26 August 2015.
In 2015 the ever-increasing number of migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea on unseaworthy vessels towards Europe led to an unprecedented crisis. Nearly 120 thousand people have reached Italy in the first 8 months of the year. While the European governments struggled to deal with the influx, the death toll in the Mediterranean reached record numbers.
Early in May the international medical relief organization Médecins Sans Frontières (M.S.F.) joined in the search and rescue operations led in the Mediterranean Sea and launched three ships at different stages: the Phoenix (run by the Migrant Offshore Aid Station), the Bourbon Argos and Dignity.

In this Wednesday, April 4, 2012 photo, a North Korean soldier, working as a guide, walks through a forest that is said to be a former camp site where the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung overnight while leading a battle against the Japanese at the foot of Mount Paektu, North Korea.

In this Wednesday, April 4, 2012 photo, a North Korean soldier, working as a guide, walks through a forest that is said to be a former camp site where the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung overnight while leading a battle against the Japanese at the foot of Mount Paektu, North Korea.

A North Korean man checks his bicycle next to a painted exclamation point on a propaganda billboard on Wednesday April 24, 2013 in Kaesong, North Korea, north of the demilitarized zone which separates the two Koreas.

A North Korean man checks his bicycle next to a painted exclamation point on a propaganda billboard on Wednesday April 24, 2013 in Kaesong, North Korea, north of the demilitarized zone which separates the two Koreas.

In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo, North Korean men stand next to a field which was damaged by July flooding in Songchon County, North Korea.

In this Aug. 13, 2012 file photo, North Korean men stand next to a field which was damaged by July flooding in Songchon County, North Korea.

North Korean children perform at the Pyongyang Kyongsang Kindergarten. Photo by David Guttenfelder

North Korean children perform at the Pyongyang Kyongsang Kindergarten.
Photo by David Guttenfelder

A North Korean woman sits next to models of military weapons at a festival for the "Kimilsungia" and "Kimjongilia" flowers, named after the country's late leaders, in Pyongyang, North Korea, Wednesday, July 24, 2013. The exhibition was held to mark the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War on July 27.

A North Korean woman sits next to models of military weapons at a festival for the “Kimilsungia” and “Kimjongilia” flowers, named after the country’s late leaders, in Pyongyang, North Korea, Wednesday, July 24, 2013. The exhibition was held to mark the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War on July 27.

A camera in the wall, used to film inside an auditorium at the Mangyongdae Schoolchildren's Palace in Pyongyang, North Korea, records as children wait for a performance to begin Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008.

A camera in the wall, used to film inside an auditorium at the Mangyongdae Schoolchildren’s Palace in Pyongyang, North Korea, records as children wait for a performance to begin Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008.

Senior North Korean military members approach an area where new North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and other military and political leaders stand at Kumsusan Memorial Palace in Pyongyang before reviewing a parade of thousands of soldiers and commemorating the 70th birthday of the late Kim Jong Il on Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012.

Senior North Korean military members approach an area where new North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and other military and political leaders stand at Kumsusan Memorial Palace in Pyongyang before reviewing a parade of thousands of soldiers and commemorating the 70th birthday of the late Kim Jong Il on Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012.

At dusk, the skyline of central Pyongyang, North Korea.

At dusk, the skyline of central Pyongyang, North Korea.

A camera in the wall, used to film inside an auditorium at the Mangyongdae Schoolchildren's Palace in Pyongyang, North Korea, records as children wait for a performance to begin Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008.

A camera in the wall, used to film inside an auditorium at the Mangyongdae Schoolchildren’s Palace in Pyongyang, North Korea, records as children wait for a performance to begin Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2008.

Senior North Korean military members approach an area where new North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and other military and political leaders stand at Kumsusan Memorial Palace in Pyongyang before reviewing a parade of thousands of soldiers and commemorating the 70th birthday of the late Kim Jong Il on Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012.

Senior North Korean military members approach an area where new North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and other military and political leaders stand at Kumsusan Memorial Palace in Pyongyang before reviewing a parade of thousands of soldiers and commemorating the 70th birthday of the late Kim Jong Il on Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012.

At dusk, the skyline of central Pyongyang, North Korea.

At dusk, the skyline of central Pyongyang, North Korea.

© Dario Mitidieri - Lost Family Portraits

A 'Maya' girl sits on an altar during the traditional celebration of 'Las Mayas' on a street in Madrid, Spain, on Sunday, May 11, 2014. The festivity of 'Las Mayas' comes from pagan rites and dates from at least the medieval age, appearing in ancient documents. It takes place every year in the beginning of May and celebrates the arrival of the spring. A girl between 7 and 11years is chosen as 'Maya' and should sit still, serious, and quiet for a couple of hours in an altar on the street decorated with flowers and plants, afterwards they walk to the church with their family where they attend a ceremony. Not more than four, or five girls are chosen as a Maya each year.

A ‘Maya’ girl sits on an altar during the traditional celebration of ‘Las Mayas’ on a street in Madrid, Spain, on Sunday, May 11, 2014. The festivity of ‘Las Mayas’ comes from pagan rites and dates from at least the medieval age, appearing in ancient documents. It takes place every year in the beginning of May and celebrates the arrival of the spring. A girl between 7 and 11years is chosen as ‘Maya’ and should sit still, serious, and quiet for a couple of hours in an altar on the street decorated with flowers and plants, afterwards they walk to the church with their family where they attend a ceremony. Not more than four, or five girls are chosen as a Maya each year.

A 'Maya' girl sits in an altar during the traditional celebration of 'Las Mayas' on the streets of the small village of Colmenar Viejo, near Madrid, Spain on Saturday, May 2, 2015. The festivity of 'Las Mayas' comes from pagan rites and dates from at least the medieval age, appearing in ancient documents. It takes place every year in the beginning of May and celebrates the arrival of the spring. A girl between 7 and 11years is chosen as 'Maya' and should sit still, serious, and quiet for a couple of hours in an altar on the street decorated with flowers and plants, afterwards they walk to the church with their family where they attend a ceremony. Not more than four, or five girls are chosen as a Maya each year.

A ‘Maya’ girl sits in an altar during the traditional celebration of ‘Las Mayas’ on the streets of the small village of Colmenar Viejo, near Madrid, Spain on Saturday, May 2, 2015. The festivity of ‘Las Mayas’ comes from pagan rites and dates from at least the medieval age, appearing in ancient documents. It takes place every year in the beginning of May and celebrates the arrival of the spring. A girl between 7 and 11years is chosen as ‘Maya’ and should sit still, serious, and quiet for a couple of hours in an altar on the street decorated with flowers and plants, afterwards they walk to the church with their family where they attend a ceremony. Not more than four, or five girls are chosen as a Maya each year.

A 'Maya' girl sits in an altar during the traditional celebration of 'Las Mayas' on the streets in Colmenar Viejo, near Madrid, Spain, Friday, May 2, 2014. The festivity of 'Las Mayas' comes from pagan rites and dates from at least the medieval age, appearing in ancient documents. It takes place every year in the beginning of May and celebrates the arrival of the spring. A girl between 7 and 11years is chosen as 'Maya' and should sit still, serious, and quiet for a couple of hours in an altar on the street decorated with flowers and plants, afterwards they walk to the church with their family where they attend a ceremony. Not more than four, or five girls are chosen as a Maya each year.

A ‘Maya’ girl sits in an altar during the traditional celebration of ‘Las Mayas’ on the streets in Colmenar Viejo, near Madrid, Spain, Friday, May 2, 2014. The festivity of ‘Las Mayas’ comes from pagan rites and dates from at least the medieval age, appearing in ancient documents. It takes place every year in the beginning of May and celebrates the arrival of the spring. A girl between 7 and 11years is chosen as ‘Maya’ and should sit still, serious, and quiet for a couple of hours in an altar on the street decorated with flowers and plants, afterwards they walk to the church with their family where they attend a ceremony. Not more than four, or five girls are chosen as a Maya each year.

A 'Maya' girl sits in an altar during the traditional celebration of 'Las Mayas' on the streets of the small village of Colmenar Viejo, near Madrid, Spain Saturday, May 2, 2015. The festivity of 'Las Mayas' comes from pagan rites and dates from at least the medieval age, appearing in ancient documents. It takes place every year in the beginning of May and celebrates the arrival of the spring. A girl between 7 and 11years is chosen as 'Maya' and should sit still, serious, and quiet for a couple of hours in an altar on the street decorated with flowers and plants, afterwards they walk to the church with their family where they attend a ceremony. Not more than four, or five girls are chosen as a Maya each year.

A ‘Maya’ girl sits in an altar during the traditional celebration of ‘Las Mayas’ on the streets of the small village of Colmenar Viejo, near Madrid, Spain Saturday, May 2, 2015. The festivity of ‘Las Mayas’ comes from pagan rites and dates from at least the medieval age, appearing in ancient documents. It takes place every year in the beginning of May and celebrates the arrival of the spring. A girl between 7 and 11years is chosen as ‘Maya’ and should sit still, serious, and quiet for a couple of hours in an altar on the street decorated with flowers and plants, afterwards they walk to the church with their family where they attend a ceremony. Not more than four, or five girls are chosen as a Maya each year.

8—Kathmandu, Nepal, Tuesday, April 28, 2015: Flames rise from burning funeral pyres during the cremation of earthquake victims, at the Pashupatinath temple on the banks of Bagmati river on April 28, 2015 in Kathmandu, Nepal. On the 25th of April, just before noon local time, as farmers were out in fields and people at home or work, a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, killing over 8,000 people and injuring more than 21,000 according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Homes, buildings and temples in Kathmandu were destroyed in the 7.8 magnitude quake, which left over 2.8 million people homeless, but it was the mountainous districts away from the capital that were the hardest hit. Villagers pulled the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble by hand and the wails of grieving families echoed through the mountains, as mothers were left to bury their own children. Over the following weeks and months, villagers picked through ruins desperate to recover whatever personal possessions they could find and salvage any building materials that could be reused. Despite relief teams arriving from all over the world in the days after the quake hit, thousands of residents living in remote hillside villages were left to fend for themselves, as rescuers struggled to reach all those affected. Multiple aftershocks, widespread damage and fear kept tourists away from the country known for its searing Himalayan peaks, damaging a vital climbing and trekking industry and compounding the recovery effort in the face of a disaster from which the people of Nepal continue to battle to recover.

8—Kathmandu, Nepal, Tuesday, April 28, 2015:
Flames rise from burning funeral pyres during the cremation of earthquake victims, at the Pashupatinath temple on the banks of Bagmati river on April 28, 2015 in Kathmandu, Nepal. On the 25th of April, just before noon local time, as farmers were out in fields and people at home or work, a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, killing over 8,000 people and injuring more than 21,000 according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Homes, buildings and temples in Kathmandu were destroyed in the 7.8 magnitude quake, which left over 2.8 million people homeless, but it was the mountainous districts away from the capital that were the hardest hit. Villagers pulled the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble by hand and the wails of grieving families echoed through the mountains, as mothers were left to bury their own children. Over the following weeks and months, villagers picked through ruins desperate to recover whatever personal possessions they could find and salvage any building materials that could be reused. Despite relief teams arriving from all over the world in the days after the quake hit, thousands of residents living in remote hillside villages were left to fend for themselves, as rescuers struggled to reach all those affected. Multiple aftershocks, widespread damage and fear kept tourists away from the country known for its searing Himalayan peaks, damaging a vital climbing and trekking industry and compounding the recovery effort in the face of a disaster from which the people of Nepal continue to battle to recover.

5—Bhaktapur, Nepal. Wednesday, April 29, 2015: Residents forage through their destroyed homes, gathering salvageable belongings on April 29, 2015 in Bhaktapur, Nepal. On the 25th of April, just before noon local time, as farmers were out in fields and people at home or work, a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, killing over 8,000 people and injuring more than 21,000 according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Homes, buildings and temples in Kathmandu were destroyed in the 7.8 magnitude quake, which left over 2.8 million people homeless, but it was the mountainous districts away from the capital that were the hardest hit. Villagers pulled the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble by hand and the wails of grieving families echoed through the mountains, as mothers were left to bury their own children. Over the following weeks and months, villagers picked through ruins desperate to recover whatever personal possessions they could find and salvage any building materials that could be reused. Despite relief teams arriving from all over the world in the days after the quake hit, thousands of residents living in remote hillside villages were left to fend for themselves, as rescuers struggled to reach all those affected. Multiple aftershocks, widespread damage and fear kept tourists away from the country known for its searing Himalayan peaks, damaging a vital climbing and trekking industry and compounding the recovery effort in the face of a disaster from which the people of Nepal continue to battle to recover.

5—Bhaktapur, Nepal. Wednesday, April 29, 2015:
Residents forage through their destroyed homes, gathering salvageable belongings on April 29, 2015 in Bhaktapur, Nepal. On the 25th of April, just before noon local time, as farmers were out in fields and people at home or work, a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, killing over 8,000 people and injuring more than 21,000 according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Homes, buildings and temples in Kathmandu were destroyed in the 7.8 magnitude quake, which left over 2.8 million people homeless, but it was the mountainous districts away from the capital that were the hardest hit. Villagers pulled the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble by hand and the wails of grieving families echoed through the mountains, as mothers were left to bury their own children. Over the following weeks and months, villagers picked through ruins desperate to recover whatever personal possessions they could find and salvage any building materials that could be reused. Despite relief teams arriving from all over the world in the days after the quake hit, thousands of residents living in remote hillside villages were left to fend for themselves, as rescuers struggled to reach all those affected. Multiple aftershocks, widespread damage and fear kept tourists away from the country known for its searing Himalayan peaks, damaging a vital climbing and trekking industry and compounding the recovery effort in the face of a disaster from which the people of Nepal continue to battle to recover.

4—Gumda, Nepal. Friday, May 08, 2015: Bishnu Gurung (3L) weeps as the body of her daughter, Rejina Gurung, 3, (unseen), is recovered from the rubble of her earthquake destroyed home, on May 8, 2015 in the village of Gumda, Nepal. Neighbors discovered the body of the small girl in the collapsed entrance of the Gurung family home, ending a 13 day search for Rejina in the remote mountainous village of Gumda in Gorkha district. On the 25th of April, just before noon local time, as farmers were out in fields and people at home or work, a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, killing over 8,000 people and injuring more than 21,000 according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Homes, buildings and temples in Kathmandu were destroyed in the 7.8 magnitude quake, which left over 2.8 million people homeless, but it was the mountainous districts away from the capital that were the hardest hit. Villagers pulled the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble by hand and the wails of grieving families echoed through the mountains, as mothers were left to bury their own children. Over the following weeks and months, villagers picked through ruins desperate to recover whatever personal possessions they could find and salvage any building materials that could be reused. Despite relief teams arriving from all over the world in the days after the quake hit, thousands of residents living in remote hillside villages were left to fend for themselves, as rescuers struggled to reach all those affected. Multiple aftershocks, widespread damage and fear kept tourists away from the country known for its searing Himalayan peaks, damaging a vital climbing and trekking industry and compounding the recovery effort in the face of a disaster from which the people of Nepal continue to battle to recover.

4—Gumda, Nepal. Friday, May 08, 2015:
Bishnu Gurung (3L) weeps as the body of her daughter, Rejina Gurung, 3, (unseen), is recovered from the rubble of her earthquake destroyed home, on May 8, 2015 in the village of Gumda, Nepal. Neighbors discovered the body of the small girl in the collapsed entrance of the Gurung family home, ending a 13 day search for Rejina in the remote mountainous village of Gumda in Gorkha district. On the 25th of April, just before noon local time, as farmers were out in fields and people at home or work, a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, killing over 8,000 people and injuring more than 21,000 according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Homes, buildings and temples in Kathmandu were destroyed in the 7.8 magnitude quake, which left over 2.8 million people homeless, but it was the mountainous districts away from the capital that were the hardest hit. Villagers pulled the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble by hand and the wails of grieving families echoed through the mountains, as mothers were left to bury their own children. Over the following weeks and months, villagers picked through ruins desperate to recover whatever personal possessions they could find and salvage any building materials that could be reused. Despite relief teams arriving from all over the world in the days after the quake hit, thousands of residents living in remote hillside villages were left to fend for themselves, as rescuers struggled to reach all those affected. Multiple aftershocks, widespread damage and fear kept tourists away from the country known for its searing Himalayan peaks, damaging a vital climbing and trekking industry and compounding the recovery effort in the face of a disaster from which the people of Nepal continue to battle to recover.

3—Gumda, Nepal. Saturday, May 09, 2015: Nepalese villagers look on as they watch a helicopter picking up a medical team, dropping aid at the edge of a makeshift landing zone on May 9, 2015 in the village of Gumda, Nepal. On the 25th of April, just before noon local time, as farmers were out in fields and people at home or work, a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, killing over 8,000 people and injuring more than 21,000 according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Homes, buildings and temples in Kathmandu were destroyed in the 7.8 magnitude quake, which left over 2.8 million people homeless, but it was the mountainous districts away from the capital that were the hardest hit. Villagers pulled the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble by hand and the wails of grieving families echoed through the mountains, as mothers were left to bury their own children. Over the following weeks and months, villagers picked through ruins desperate to recover whatever personal possessions they could find and salvage any building materials that could be reused. Despite relief teams arriving from all over the world in the days after the quake hit, thousands of residents living in remote hillside villages were left to fend for themselves, as rescuers struggled to reach all those affected. Multiple aftershocks, widespread damage and fear kept tourists away from the country known for its searing Himalayan peaks, damaging a vital climbing and trekking industry and compounding the recovery effort in the face of a disaster from which the people of Nepal continue to battle to recover.

3—Gumda, Nepal. Saturday, May 09, 2015:
Nepalese villagers look on as they watch a helicopter picking up a medical team, dropping aid at the edge of a makeshift landing zone on May 9, 2015 in the village of Gumda, Nepal. On the 25th of April, just before noon local time, as farmers were out in fields and people at home or work, a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, killing over 8,000 people and injuring more than 21,000 according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Homes, buildings and temples in Kathmandu were destroyed in the 7.8 magnitude quake, which left over 2.8 million people homeless, but it was the mountainous districts away from the capital that were the hardest hit. Villagers pulled the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble by hand and the wails of grieving families echoed through the mountains, as mothers were left to bury their own children. Over the following weeks and months, villagers picked through ruins desperate to recover whatever personal possessions they could find and salvage any building materials that could be reused. Despite relief teams arriving from all over the world in the days after the quake hit, thousands of residents living in remote hillside villages were left to fend for themselves, as rescuers struggled to reach all those affected. Multiple aftershocks, widespread damage and fear kept tourists away from the country known for its searing Himalayan peaks, damaging a vital climbing and trekking industry and compounding the recovery effort in the face of a disaster from which the people of Nepal continue to battle to recover.

7. ANTARCTICA - NOVEMBER 28, 2015: The winter expedition crew of Russian research team and (R) Chilean scientist Dr Ernesto Molina, drink "Samagon" a home-made vodka, as they sit in a bedroom of the Bellingshausen Antarctica base on the 28th of November, 2015 near Villa Las Estrellas, in the Fildes Peninsula on King George Island, Antarctica. More than a century has passed since explorers raced to plant their flags at the bottom of the world. But today, an array of countries are rushing to assert greater influence in Antarctica. Russia built the continent’s first Orthodox church, pictured here, on a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese labourers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate 5 bases on Antarctica. And India’s futuristic new Bharathi base resembles a spaceship. The continent is supposed to be protected as a scientific preserve for decades to come, but many are looking toward the day those protective treaties expire — and exploring the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.

7. ANTARCTICA – NOVEMBER 28, 2015:
The winter expedition crew of Russian research team and (R) Chilean scientist Dr Ernesto Molina, drink “Samagon” a home-made vodka, as they sit in a bedroom of the Bellingshausen Antarctica base on the 28th of November, 2015 near Villa Las Estrellas, in the Fildes Peninsula on King George Island, Antarctica. More than a century has passed since explorers raced to plant their flags at the bottom of the world. But today, an array of countries are rushing to assert greater influence in Antarctica. Russia built the continent’s first Orthodox church, pictured here, on a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese labourers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate 5 bases on Antarctica. And India’s futuristic new Bharathi base resembles a spaceship. The continent is supposed to be protected as a scientific preserve for decades to come, but many are looking toward the day those protective treaties expire — and exploring the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.

6. ANTARCTICA - DECEMBER 07, 2015: A Member of a German research team from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, counts the number of penguin species and pairs as part of ongoing research on bird and penguin species in Antarctica, on 7th of December, 2015 on Ardley Island in the Fildes Peninsula on King George Island, Antarctica. Yardley Island has been designated an Antarctic Specially Protected Area (ASPA 150) because of the importance of its seabird and penguin colonies. More than a century has passed since explorers raced to plant their flags at the bottom of the world. But today, an array of countries are rushing to assert greater influence in Antarctica. Russia built the continent’s first Orthodox church, pictured here, on a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese labourers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate 5 bases on Antarctica. And India’s futuristic new Bharathi base resembles a spaceship. The continent is supposed to be protected as a scientific preserve for decades to come, but many are looking toward the day those protective treaties expire — and exploring the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.

6. ANTARCTICA – DECEMBER 07, 2015:
A Member of a German research team from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, counts the number of penguin species and pairs as part of ongoing research on bird and penguin species in Antarctica, on 7th of December, 2015 on Ardley Island in the Fildes Peninsula on King George Island, Antarctica. Yardley Island has been designated an Antarctic Specially Protected Area (ASPA 150) because of the importance of its seabird and penguin colonies. More than a century has passed since explorers raced to plant their flags at the bottom of the world. But today, an array of countries are rushing to assert greater influence in Antarctica. Russia built the continent’s first Orthodox church, pictured here, on a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese labourers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate 5 bases on Antarctica. And India’s futuristic new Bharathi base resembles a spaceship. The continent is supposed to be protected as a scientific preserve for decades to come, but many are looking toward the day those protective treaties expire — and exploring the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.

5. ANTARCTICA - DECEMBER 03, 2015: Priest, Father Benjam Maltzev looks on in the Bell room, after a vigil at the Russian Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity on the 3rd of December, 2015 at the Bellingshausen Russian Antarctic research base in the Fildes Peninsula on King George Island, Antarctica. More than a century has passed since explorers raced to plant their flags at the bottom of the world. But today, an array of countries are rushing to assert greater influence in Antarctica. Russia built the continent’s first Orthodox church, pictured here, on a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese labourers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate 5 bases on Antarctica. And India’s futuristic new Bharathi base resembles a spaceship. The continent is supposed to be protected as a scientific preserve for decades to come, but many are looking toward the day those protective treaties expire — and exploring the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.

5. ANTARCTICA – DECEMBER 03, 2015:
Priest, Father Benjam Maltzev looks on in the Bell room, after a vigil at the Russian Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity on the 3rd of December, 2015 at the Bellingshausen Russian Antarctic research base in the Fildes Peninsula on King George Island, Antarctica. More than a century has passed since explorers raced to plant their flags at the bottom of the world. But today, an array of countries are rushing to assert greater influence in Antarctica. Russia built the continent’s first Orthodox church, pictured here, on a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese labourers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate 5 bases on Antarctica. And India’s futuristic new Bharathi base resembles a spaceship. The continent is supposed to be protected as a scientific preserve for decades to come, but many are looking toward the day those protective treaties expire — and exploring the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.

3. ANTARCTICA - DECEMBER 02, 2015: Chilean scientist, Dr Ernesto Molina, supported by logisticians from the Chilean Antarctic Institute, are battered by waves on their way back to base after having taken sea-water samples on the 2nd of December, 2015 in the Fildes Peninsula on King George Island, Antarctica. Chilean scientist, Dr Ernesto Molina, supported by the Chilean Antarctic Institute, INACH, research focuses on climate changes' impact on marine ecosystems, focusing on Phytoplankton dynamics. More than a century has passed since explorers raced to plant their flags at the bottom of the world. But today, an array of countries are rushing to assert greater influence in Antarctica. Russia built the continent’s first Orthodox church, pictured here, on a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese labourers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate 5 bases on Antarctica. And India’s futuristic new Bharathi base resembles a spaceship. The continent is supposed to be protected as a scientific preserve for decades to come, but many are looking toward the day those protective treaties expire — and exploring the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.

3. ANTARCTICA – DECEMBER 02, 2015:
Chilean scientist, Dr Ernesto Molina, supported by logisticians from the Chilean Antarctic Institute, are battered by waves on their way back to base after having taken sea-water samples on the 2nd of December, 2015 in the Fildes Peninsula on King George Island, Antarctica. Chilean scientist, Dr Ernesto Molina, supported by the Chilean Antarctic Institute, INACH, research focuses on climate changes’ impact on marine ecosystems, focusing on Phytoplankton dynamics. More than a century has passed since explorers raced to plant their flags at the bottom of the world. But today, an array of countries are rushing to assert greater influence in Antarctica. Russia built the continent’s first Orthodox church, pictured here, on a glacier-filled island with fjords and elephant seals. Less than an hour away by snowmobile, Chinese labourers have updated the Great Wall Station, a linchpin in China’s plan to operate 5 bases on Antarctica. And India’s futuristic new Bharathi base resembles a spaceship. The continent is supposed to be protected as a scientific preserve for decades to come, but many are looking toward the day those protective treaties expire — and exploring the strategic and commercial opportunities that exist right now.

© Corentin Fohlen/ pour Stern et Paris Match/ Divergence. Paris, France. 11 janvier 2015. Manifestation a paris contre le terrorisme et en soutien aux victimes de l'attaque contre le journal Charlie Hebdo et l'epicerie casher.

© Corentin Fohlen/ pour Stern et Paris Match/ Divergence. Paris, France. 11 janvier 2015. Manifestation a paris contre le terrorisme et en soutien aux victimes de l’attaque contre le journal Charlie Hebdo et l’epicerie casher.

Furcifer balteatus, a juvenile in a recently burned landscape. Fires are often deadly for chameleons, because they can't move fast enough to escape them. The common practice of burning the landscape at the end of every dry season has affected many species of chameleons, and reduced their populations.

Furcifer balteatus, a juvenile in a recently burned landscape.
Fires are often deadly for chameleons, because they can’t move fast enough to escape them. The common practice of burning the landscape at the end of every dry season has affected many species of chameleons, and reduced their populations.

Brookesia decaryi male and female

Brookesia decaryi male and female

Furcifer ambrensis, female foraging for insects with extendable tongue.

Furcifer ambrensis, female foraging for insects with extendable tongue.

Panther chameleon, Furcifer pardalis, orange form from northern Madagascar, now very rare in the wild due to intense collecting for the pet trade. Two males fighting. Controlled conditions in a large voliere at Madagascar exotique.

Panther chameleon, Furcifer pardalis, orange form from northern Madagascar, now very rare in the wild due to intense collecting for the pet trade.
Two males fighting.
Controlled conditions in a large voliere at Madagascar exotique.

BEAVER CREEK,COLORADO,USA,08.FEB.15 - ALPINE SKIING - FIS Alpine World Ski Championships, Birds of Prey, Alpine combined, downhill, men. Image shows Ondrej Bank (CZE). Ondrej Bank (CZE) crashed during the downhill race of the alpine combined at the FIS World Champioships 2015 in Beaver Creek. Keywords: crash. Photo: GEPA pictures/ Christian Walgram

BEAVER CREEK,COLORADO,USA,08.FEB.15 – ALPINE SKIING – FIS Alpine World Ski Championships, Birds of Prey, Alpine combined, downhill, men. Image shows Ondrej Bank (CZE). Ondrej Bank (CZE) crashed during the downhill race of the alpine combined at the FIS World Champioships 2015 in Beaver Creek. Keywords: crash.
Photo: GEPA pictures/ Christian Walgram

© Christian Bobst - The Gris-gris Wrestlers of Senegal 04 © Christian Bobst - The Gris-gris Wrestlers of Senegal 03 © Christian Bobst - The Gris-gris Wrestlers of Senegal 02 © Christian Bobst - The Gris-gris Wrestlers of Senegal 01 © Chen Jie - Tianjin Explosion

Syrians fleeing the war wait to enter Turkey near the Turkish border crossing at Akcakale in Sanliurfa province on June 15, 2015. Turkey said it was taking measures to limit the flow of Syrian refugees onto its territory after an influx of thousands more over the last days due to fighting between Kurds and jihadists. Under an "open-door" policy, Turkey has taken in 1.8 million Syrian refugees since the conflict in Syria erupted in 2011. AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC / AFP / BULENT KILIC

Syrians fleeing the war wait to enter Turkey near the Turkish border crossing at Akcakale in Sanliurfa province on June 15, 2015. Turkey said it was taking measures to limit the flow of Syrian refugees onto its territory after an influx of thousands more over the last days due to fighting between Kurds and jihadists. Under an “open-door” policy, Turkey has taken in 1.8 million Syrian refugees since the conflict in Syria erupted in 2011. AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC / AFP / BULENT KILIC

Islamic State members ask people to go back to city center at the Turkish Akcakale crossing gate in Sanliurfa province, on June 13, 2015. Turkey said it was taking measures to limit the flow of Syrian refugees onto its territory after an influx of thousands more over the last days due to fighting between Kurds and jihadists. Under an "open-door" policy, Turkey has taken in 1.8 million Syrian refugees since the conflict in Syria erupted in 2011. AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC / AFP / BULENT KILIC

Islamic State members ask people to go back to city center at the Turkish Akcakale crossing gate in Sanliurfa province, on June 13, 2015. Turkey said it was taking measures to limit the flow of Syrian refugees onto its territory after an influx of thousands more over the last days due to fighting between Kurds and jihadists. Under an “open-door” policy, Turkey has taken in 1.8 million Syrian refugees since the conflict in Syria erupted in 2011. AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC / AFP / BULENT KILIC

Syrians fleeing the war rush through broken down border fences to enter Turkish territory illegally, near the Turkish border crossing at Akcakale in Sanliurfa province on June 14, 2015. Turkey said it was taking measures to limit the flow of Syrian refugees onto its territory after an influx of thousands more over the last days due to fighting between Kurds and jihadists. Under an "open-door" policy, Turkey has taken in 1.8 million Syrian refugees since the conflict in Syria erupted in 2011. AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC / AFP / BULENT KILIC

Syrians fleeing the war rush through broken down border fences to enter Turkish territory illegally, near the Turkish border crossing at Akcakale in Sanliurfa province on June 14, 2015. Turkey said it was taking measures to limit the flow of Syrian refugees onto its territory after an influx of thousands more over the last days due to fighting between Kurds and jihadists. Under an “open-door” policy, Turkey has taken in 1.8 million Syrian refugees since the conflict in Syria erupted in 2011. AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC / AFP / BULENT KILIC

A Syrian child fleeing the war is lifted over border fences to enter Turkish territory illegally, near the Turkish border crossing at Akcakale in Sanliurfa province on June 14, 2015. Turkey said it was taking measures to limit the flow of Syrian refugees onto its territory after an influx of thousands more over the last days due to fighting between Kurds and jihadists. Under an "open-door" policy, Turkey has taken in 1.8 million Syrian refugees since the conflict in Syria erupted in 2011. AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC / AFP / BULENT KILIC

A Syrian child fleeing the war is lifted over border fences to enter Turkish territory illegally, near the Turkish border crossing at Akcakale in Sanliurfa province on June 14, 2015. Turkey said it was taking measures to limit the flow of Syrian refugees onto its territory after an influx of thousands more over the last days due to fighting between Kurds and jihadists. Under an “open-door” policy, Turkey has taken in 1.8 million Syrian refugees since the conflict in Syria erupted in 2011. AFP PHOTO / BULENT KILIC / AFP / BULENT KILIC

LOME', TOGO, 29 JANUARY 2014: Containers with 4 tons of illegal ivory confiscated in January 2014 by the Togolese customs office from its new deep water port, Lome,' Togo. This ivory has been directly linked through DNA evidence to the elephant massacre that occured in Dzanga Bai, Central African Republic in 2013. That massacre was perpetrated by Seleka rebels who climbed the observation towers at the famous forest elephant gathering place in Dzanga Bai and gunned down the elephants with automatic weapons. The Seleka rebels would have used the proceeds from this ivory sale for some of the violence which has plagued C.A.R over much of 2013 and 2014. Togo has been viewed as a new opportunity by ivory smugglers with its new deep water port. Customs officers with new Container scanning technology have made the efforts of these smugglers more difficult.

LOME’, TOGO, 29 JANUARY 2014: Containers with 4 tons of illegal ivory confiscated in January 2014 by the Togolese customs office from its new deep water port, Lome,’ Togo. This ivory has been directly linked through DNA evidence to the elephant massacre that occured in Dzanga Bai, Central African Republic in 2013. That massacre was perpetrated by Seleka rebels who climbed the observation towers at the famous forest elephant gathering place in Dzanga Bai and gunned down the elephants with automatic weapons. The Seleka rebels would have used the proceeds from this ivory sale for some of the violence which has plagued C.A.R over much of 2013 and 2014. Togo has been viewed as a new opportunity by ivory smugglers with its new deep water port. Customs officers with new Container scanning technology have made the efforts of these smugglers more difficult.

MBOKI, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, 25 NOVEMBER 2014: Ugandan soldiers cross one of many rivers while on patrol against the Lord's Resistance Army close to the border of the DRC. The Ugandan contingent based in CAR are focused on the aprehension of the Lord's Resistance Army, LRA, the notorious rebel group led by Joseph Kony which has terrorized citizens of Uganda, C.A.R, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo for the last 4 decades. Soldiers are seen crossing a river, a technique they have perfected with ropes despite the fact that many of the men cannot swim. The LRA contingent they are hunting is coming from Garamba National Park where they have been hunting ivory, a task ordered by Joseph Kony and detailed in a commander’s diary that this Ugandan contingent captured in an ambush earlier in 2014. Defectors say that Joseph Kony, leader of the LRA, is increasingly reliant on ivory as a means of trade for weapons and supplies from their hosts the Sudanese Army.

MBOKI, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, 25 NOVEMBER 2014: Ugandan soldiers cross one of many rivers while on patrol against the Lord’s Resistance Army close to the border of the DRC. The Ugandan contingent based in CAR are focused on the aprehension of the Lord’s Resistance Army, LRA, the notorious rebel group led by Joseph Kony which has terrorized citizens of Uganda, C.A.R, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo for the last 4 decades. Soldiers are seen crossing a river, a technique they have perfected with ropes despite the fact that many of the men cannot swim. The LRA contingent they are hunting is coming from Garamba National Park where they have been hunting ivory, a task ordered by Joseph Kony and detailed in a commander’s diary that this Ugandan contingent captured in an ambush earlier in 2014. Defectors say that Joseph Kony, leader of the LRA, is increasingly reliant on ivory as a means of trade for weapons and supplies from their hosts the Sudanese Army.

NZARA, SOUTH SUDAN: Michael Oryem, 29, is a recently defected Lord's Resistance Army fighter who's former L.R.A group is involved in the poaching of Ivory in Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Garamba is a former base of operations for the LRA and a major source of financing for the notorious group. Oryem is seen with 2 of 6 ivory tusks that he hid and then led the Ugandan forces to inside the border region of the Central African Republic. He claims that the LRA killed many elephants in Garamba National Park in the DRC and that he was ordered by Joseph Kony, the LRA's notorious leader, to bring the ivory to him in Darfur, South Sudan. Ivory is now a real means of financing for the LRA, it is used for both food and weapons supplies and is traded to the Sudanese Army who transports it north to Khartoum. Oryem was abducted by the group when he was 9 and lived with them for over 17 years in the wild. He was made a commander in the group at the age of 12. The LRA is infamous for the killing and abduction of thousands of civilians across multiple countries. He defected and is now a recent new member of the Ugandan Army, UPDF, African Union force hunting the LRA.

NZARA, SOUTH SUDAN: Michael Oryem, 29, is a recently defected Lord’s Resistance Army fighter who’s former L.R.A group is involved in the poaching of Ivory in Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Garamba is a former base of operations for the LRA and a major source of financing for the notorious group. Oryem is seen with 2 of 6 ivory tusks that he hid and then led the Ugandan forces to inside the border region of the Central African Republic. He claims that the LRA killed many elephants in Garamba National Park in the DRC and that he was ordered by Joseph Kony, the LRA’s notorious leader, to bring the ivory to him in Darfur, South Sudan. Ivory is now a real means of financing for the LRA, it is used for both food and weapons supplies and is traded to the Sudanese Army who transports it north to Khartoum. Oryem was abducted by the group when he was 9 and lived with them for over 17 years in the wild. He was made a commander in the group at the age of 12. The LRA is infamous for the killing and abduction of thousands of civilians across multiple countries. He defected and is now a recent new member of the Ugandan Army, UPDF, African Union force hunting the LRA.

ZAKOUMA NATIONAL PARK, CHAD: Rangers from a horse patrol group exhibit their riding skills as they return to base at Zakouma National Park, Chad after weeks on elephant patrol. The horse patrols are the old guard of Zakouma's rangers and have seen a good deal of conflict in their time in the park. Zakouma lost nearly 75% of its elephants in the decade before 2011 due to raids by Janajaweed and Sudanese poachers, many of them from the Sudanese military. The president of Chad, Idris Deby, is a big supporter of the elephant of Zakouma and of its elephants. The herds here until recently used to be as large as 1000 animals all moving together, severe poaching over the last decade saw that number decimated and now only around 10% of the number remains. Since 2011 however there has been control over poaching and only 3 elephant have been poached in the last 2 years. The credit for that lies with these rangers and the new management of the park, including nomad groups who are a vital part of intelligence gathering for Zakouma.

ZAKOUMA NATIONAL PARK, CHAD: Rangers from a horse patrol group exhibit their riding skills as they return to base at Zakouma National Park, Chad after weeks on elephant patrol. The horse patrols are the old guard of Zakouma’s rangers and have seen a good deal of conflict in their time in the park. Zakouma lost nearly 75% of its elephants in the decade before 2011 due to raids by Janajaweed and Sudanese poachers, many of them from the Sudanese military. The president of Chad, Idris Deby, is a big supporter of the elephant of Zakouma and of its elephants. The herds here until recently used to be as large as 1000 animals all moving together, severe poaching over the last decade saw that number decimated and now only around 10% of the number remains. Since 2011 however there has been control over poaching and only 3 elephant have been poached in the last 2 years. The credit for that lies with these rangers and the new management of the park, including nomad groups who are a vital part of intelligence gathering for Zakouma.

© Anuar Patjane Floriuk - Whale Whisperers

Adam Abdel, age 7, was badly burned when a bomb, dropped on February 12 by a Sudanese government’s Antonov plane, landed next to his family’s home in Burgu, Central Darfur, Sudan, February 27, 2015.

Adam Abdel, age 7, was badly burned when a bomb, dropped on February 12 by a Sudanese government’s Antonov plane, landed next to his family’s home in Burgu, Central Darfur, Sudan, February 27, 2015.

-- AFP PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2015 -- A wounded Syrian girl looks on at a make shift hospital in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following shelling and air raids by Syrian government forces on August 22, 2015. At least 20 civilians and wounded or trapped 200 in Douma, a monitoring group said, just six days after regime air strikes killed more than 100 people and sparked international condemnation of one of the bloodiest government attacks in Syria's war. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY

— AFP PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2015 —
A wounded Syrian girl looks on at a make shift hospital in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following shelling and air raids by Syrian government forces on August 22, 2015. At least 20 civilians and wounded or trapped 200 in Douma, a monitoring group said, just six days after regime air strikes killed more than 100 people and sparked international condemnation of one of the bloodiest government attacks in Syria’s war. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY

A wounded Syrian girl hold on to a relative as she awaits treatment by doctors at a makeshift hospital in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes on the city on May 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY

A wounded Syrian girl hold on to a relative as she awaits treatment by doctors at a makeshift hospital in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes on the city on May 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY

A wounded Syrian girl cries at a make-shift hospital in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by regime forces, on August 12, 2015. At least 27 civilians were killed in Syrian government air strikes on the Eastern Ghouta region near Damascus according to a monitoring group. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY

A wounded Syrian girl cries at a make-shift hospital in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by regime forces, on August 12, 2015. At least 27 civilians were killed in Syrian government air strikes on the Eastern Ghouta region near Damascus according to a monitoring group. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY

-- AFP PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2015 -- A Syrian man carries the body of a child killed in a reported air strike by government forces in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, on November 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY === GRAPHIC CONTENT ===

— AFP PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2015 —
A Syrian man carries the body of a child killed in a reported air strike by government forces in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, on November 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / ABD DOUMANY === GRAPHIC CONTENT ===

3. Hasaka, Syria - August 1, 2015 A doctor rubs ointment on the burns of Jacob, 16, in front of a poster of Abdullah Ocalan, center, the jailed leader of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, at a YPG hospital compound on the outskirts of Hasaka. According to YPG fighters at the scene, Jacob is an ISIS fighter from Deir al-Zour and the only survivior from an ambush made by YPG fighters over a truck alleged to carry ISIS fighters on the outskirts of Hasaka. Six ISIS fighters died in the attack, 5 of them completely disfigured by the explosion.

3. Hasaka, Syria – August 1, 2015
A doctor rubs ointment on the burns of Jacob, 16, in front of a poster of Abdullah Ocalan, center, the jailed leader of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, at a YPG hospital compound on the outskirts of Hasaka. According to YPG fighters at the scene, Jacob is an ISIS fighter from Deir al-Zour and the only survivior from an ambush made by YPG fighters over a truck alleged to carry ISIS fighters on the outskirts of Hasaka. Six ISIS fighters died in the attack, 5 of them completely disfigured by the explosion.

1. Tapajós River, Itaituba, Pará State, Brazil, on February 10, 2015. Indigenous children jump into the water as they play around the Tapajós river, in the Munduruku tribal area called Sawré Muybu.

1. Tapajós River, Itaituba, Pará State, Brazil, on February 10, 2015.
Indigenous children jump into the water as they play around the Tapajós river, in the Munduruku tribal area called Sawré Muybu.